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MacBytes
Jun 24, 2004, 09:15 AM
Category: Apple Software
Link: iChat AV @ 35,000 Feet (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20040624101508)
Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)

Approved by Mudbug

Laslo Panaflex
Jun 24, 2004, 09:22 AM
Tres Cool. Having internet on a flight like that could really make it more bareable as well.

Mudbug
Jun 24, 2004, 09:23 AM
Tres Cool. Having internet on a flight like that could really make it more bareable as well.

no doubt - that would definitely help melt away the miles for a travelling parent on their way to visit their kids, or jetting off for business for a week. I've been playing with my new iSight this week and having a blast with it. I get to see my kids on summer vacation quite a bit, even though I'm stuck at work. Granted, it's not on a plane, but it's still very cool.

road dog
Jun 24, 2004, 09:51 AM
that is so dorky... now i know why pc users think mac users are weird.

AlfieJ
Jun 24, 2004, 10:17 AM
777's only have one engine under each wing. That picture shows two. :confused:

Maybe it's a 747. :)

RHutch
Jun 24, 2004, 10:22 AM
that is so dorky... now i know why pc users think mac users are weird.

Being productive with your computer is something that PC users have a hard time fathoming. :rolleyes:

Photorun
Jun 24, 2004, 10:32 AM
Being productive with your computer is something that PC users have a hard time fathoming. :rolleyes:

You mean rebooting every day, sometimes twice a day as often is the case around the college I work at, isn't productive?

(my uptime on my G5 at work is three weeks, at home two weeks, and the only reason I've rebooted at all was because I ran the software update>security update and it requires a restart :) Oh, and my reboot is about 1/3 the time it takes for a peecee to boot)

Mr. Anderson
Jun 24, 2004, 10:38 AM
Very cool, but not all that useful. You don't really have much privacy, jets are a bit noisy and what would the person next to you think?

D

swingerofbirch
Jun 24, 2004, 10:43 AM
I have iChatted on an airplane before sans Internet connection which is rather cool. This was before iSight came out. But anyhow, if you have two mac users on the airplane just go to rendesvouz and you can chat without Internet connection. It was fun (me and my sister chatting, we were not seated near each other). Just need an airport card in each laptop....

Qunchuy
Jun 24, 2004, 11:05 AM
...if you have two mac users on the airplane just go to rendesvouz and you can chat without Internet connection...Just need an airport card in each laptop....
...and the permission of the pilot in command. Wireless networking on an airliner isn't something you should use without asking first. Not because it's necessarily dangerous, but because it's against the rules, and because you can get in serious trouble for operating an unauthorized transmitter.

Gizmotoy
Jun 24, 2004, 11:18 AM
...and the permission of the pilot in command. Wireless networking on an airliner isn't something you should use without asking first. Not because it's necessarily dangerous, but because it's against the rules, and because you can get in serious trouble for operating an unauthorized transmitter.

If its against the rules how do they offer a wireless internet service on planes at all?

MCCFR
Jun 24, 2004, 11:22 AM
And just to take it a bit further, I've recreated the sig as Airplane/Flight Number/Departing-Arriving which looks kinda cool.

nsb3000
Jun 24, 2004, 12:51 PM
777's only have one engine under each wing. That picture shows two. :confused:

Maybe it's a 747. :)

Although there is frequently quite a bit of variation within Model numbers on Jumbo-jets, it appears you are right. A quick peak at Boeing's website shows 777's with only two engines...

ALoLA
Jun 24, 2004, 01:30 PM
On a somewhat related note, has anyone seen that Centrino commercial where that couple has a laptop in some ancient colliseum with some puny camera supposedly broadcasting their experience wirelessly to their friends/family? First, is there such a camera? Second, is there such a program with that kind of frame rate? Third, can they get that kind of bandwidth sitting at least 50 feet from even the outer walls of this ancient building? And lastly, is the building equipped with Wi-Fi, or are they using some kind of satellite hookup? Or did I miss the illegible disclaimer that may have flashed briefly on the screen?

By the way, I thoroughly enjoy using my iSight. :)

Mudbug
Jun 24, 2004, 02:04 PM
On a somewhat related note, has anyone seen that Centrino commercial where that couple has a laptop in some ancient colliseum with some puny camera supposedly broadcasting their experience wirelessly to their friends/family? First, is there such a camera? Second, is there such a program with that kind of frame rate? Third, can they get that kind of bandwidth sitting at least 50 feet from even the outer walls of this ancient building? And lastly, is the building equipped with Wi-Fi, or are they using some kind of satellite hookup? Or did I miss the illegible disclaimer that may have flashed briefly on the screen?

By the way, I thoroughly enjoy using my iSight. :)

No, you're not crazy (well, not because of this anyway... ;)). Ancient ruins are usually not the best place to pick up wifi signals, I'd imagine. I'm sure they're relying on something like artistic license to try to get their point across, but it's stupid really. There is no magical wifi signal from space that allows you to wireless get online anywhere you feel like it. And even if they're using a satellite feed, there's nothing special about a centrino chip in that regard that you can't do with any other laptop with a satellite modem or cellular modem card.

there's already a thread going on about this here

It's an advertising lie used to move product, plain and simple. For example - my boss was caught by it hook line & sinker when he took his powerbook (and yes, I know it doesn't have a centrino, so no correcting me) on vacation with him last spring - he tried to access the internet from the beach, and couldn't understand why it didn't work. "It works in the office - why not there?" he said... the amount that I explained this to him had no bearing on the outcome, I assure you. I'm sure he'll try it again somewhere else, but probably not bring it up with me the next time.

Chip NoVaMac
Jun 24, 2004, 02:37 PM
this is interesting given the news about Logan Airport doing wi-fi. For me $8 for a days use of "high-speed" internet from point-to-point would be worth the cost...

musicpyrite
Jun 24, 2004, 02:50 PM
777's only have one engine under each wing. That picture shows two. :confused:

Maybe it's a 747. :)

Looks to me more like an Airbus 340 (http://news.bbc.co.uk/olmedia/330000/images/_332787_airbus340_300.jpg).

jsw
Jun 24, 2004, 03:43 PM
If its against the rules how do they offer a wireless internet service on planes at all?

The service isn't, AFAIK, wireless within the plane. I think you connect to an Ethernet port.

jsw
Jun 24, 2004, 03:54 PM
that is so dorky... now i know why pc users think mac users are weird.

Yeah, the little chat window pic with the "Sales should be up significantly this quarter" doesn't seem contrived, does it?

And I'm sure I'm just being an idiot, but doesn't that second engine (the farthest one) look like it's pointed in the wrong direction - or at least a different direction than the other one? I'm not sure it's actually an engine. Perhaps Apple did a bad job Photoshopping this fake account. ;) If it isn't an engine, what is it?

Chip NoVaMac
Jun 24, 2004, 04:13 PM
...and the permission of the pilot in command. Wireless networking on an airliner isn't something you should use without asking first. Not because it's necessarily dangerous, but because it's against the rules, and because you can get in serious trouble for operating an unauthorized transmitter.

Some of the "rules" were put in place in order for the airline to make $20 to $40 off their cell phone service.

Chip NoVaMac
Jun 24, 2004, 04:19 PM
Yeah, the little chat window pic with the "Sales should be up significantly this quarter" doesn't seem contrived, does it?

And I'm sure I'm just being an idiot, but doesn't that second engine (the farthest one) look like it's pointed in the wrong direction - or at least a different direction than the other one? I'm not sure it's actually an engine. Perhaps Apple did a bad job Photoshopping this fake account. ;) If it isn't an engine, what is it?

My you may be right! Lets get a special prosecutor in on this right away! just kidding, couldn't resist. :D

It does look like the second engine was added.

warcraftmaster
Jun 25, 2004, 01:12 AM
Category: Apple Software
Link: iChat AV @ 35,000 Feet (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20040624101508)
Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)

Approved by Mudbug
how do i get that airplane thing
how do i use this (Hint: AppleScript + Unicode dingbat 2708.)

AlfieJ
Jun 25, 2004, 09:01 AM
Looks to me more like an Airbus 340 (http://news.bbc.co.uk/olmedia/330000/images/_332787_airbus340_300.jpg).
You were right--Apple's updated the page. It no longer says the plane was a 777, it now says it was an Airbus.

Gizmotoy
Jun 25, 2004, 02:45 PM
The service isn't, AFAIK, wireless within the plane. I think you connect to an Ethernet port.

I suppose that could be. It says on the site that the system is wireless, but I suppose they could just mean the plane doesn't have a cord hanging off the back of it ;)