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MacBytes
Aug 31, 2009, 01:37 PM
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Category: Apple Hardware
Link: Bandwidth hogs iPhone and other smartphones (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20090831143750)
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Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)
Approved by Mudbug

severe
Aug 31, 2009, 02:43 PM
I don't care if AT&T buckles under the strain of a taxed network. I pay a premium for unlimited usage that is simply not being offered.

"Independent telecom analyst Chetan Sharma estimates that the typical wireless subscriber consumes 120 megabytes each month; typical iPhone owners use four times that."

I've used no discretion and have consumed an average of <300 megabytes per month for two years, yet I'm still limited to what applications can be used on AT&T's unlimited network and I'm charged the same as those that may be abusing this network.

"3G networks were not designed effectively for this kind of usage" -AT&T's CTO.

If they're not ready for primetime, they should charge accordingly or get off the bus.

"In private meetings, AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson has said that the most active 5% or so of data users are causing problems for the other 95%. AT&T is working on a revamped data plan whereby light data users would pay less, and heavy users would pay a premium rate — or leave."

2+ years later and we finally just hear that they are working on it. How 'bout the nearly $1k I've had to put into this so-called unlimited data plan for my less than 300MB of bandwidth per month? What's that good for?

Rodimus Prime
Sep 1, 2009, 01:30 PM
You have a lot of learn about the system. If you look at the internet backbone most of what they are using has been in placed for over a decade. Hell most of our internate is handled by old copper phone lines and cable TV lines. That is OLD OLD stuff. And now we are straining that system but it was in place a long long time.

Now lets look at the cell system. The entire system has to be built from the ground up in the past 20 years. New towers take YEARS to be put up. I live in a suburb of Houston and in parts of town the cell service is crap across the board. It is not AT&T fault but the cities own laws. They do not want towers in side the city so they telecomes fight with the city for a while. Most of the towers take cover the city are on the edges of town. I live on an edge and it only been in the past year that cell service here got good and I can pull full bars. Normally it has been 2-3 bars is all I could get and a very flacky 3G.

They are fighting to get the towers up but still takes years to get one approved and set up.

Hell once it is approved by a city to build a new one it takes months just to get it built and then several more months to get all the everything fined tuned. It is a very long process and it is being out paced by demand. 4G will help them keep a lead by boosting a current system but it still has to be installed and set up.

Peace
Sep 1, 2009, 01:31 PM
And AT&T didn't realize this would happen ?

HELLO ?

ibosie
Sep 1, 2009, 02:42 PM
In the UK, O2 are already struggling to provide a network that can sustain demand. For the past 2 months I have been regularly unable to receive or make calls, SMS/MMS are severely delayed and the internet barely works despite living and working in HSDPA areas. O2's mobile broadband product is displaying the same symptoms which, according to customer services, is simply the result of too many users trying to connect in central London. It's not just London suffering either, the problem seems to be nation wide. I think Apple need to unravel the single carrier agreement sooner rather than later to help spread the load over more than just one network. WiFi hotspots offer little benefit to solving the problem - they're too often slower than 3G itself, or they just don't work.

severe
Sep 1, 2009, 03:03 PM
You have a lot of learn about the system. If you look at the internet backbone most of what they are using has been in placed for over a decade. Hell most of our internate is handled by old copper phone lines and cable TV lines. That is OLD OLD stuff. And now we are straining that system but it was in place a long long time.

Now lets look at the cell system. The entire system has to be built from the ground up in the past 20 years. New towers take YEARS to be put up. I live in a suburb of Houston and in parts of town the cell service is crap across the board. It is not AT&T fault but the cities own laws. They do not want towers in side the city so they telecomes fight with the city for a while. Most of the towers take cover the city are on the edges of town. I live on an edge and it only been in the past year that cell service here got good and I can pull full bars. Normally it has been 2-3 bars is all I could get and a very flacky 3G.

They are fighting to get the towers up but still takes years to get one approved and set up.

Hell once it is approved by a city to build a new one it takes months just to get it built and then several more months to get all the everything fined tuned. It is a very long process and it is being out paced by demand. 4G will help them keep a lead by boosting a current system but it still has to be installed and set up.

What are you yapping about? I don't need to learn a damn thing. Are you basing that comment on my "2+ years later and we finally just hear that they are working on it" statement? How's 'bout addressing my concerns.

I've stated the facts. AT&T are simply not holding up their end of the deal. I thought I made myself clear. I'm paying for a service they are not providing. Some call it bait and switch.

Allow me to pose a few questions:


How much bandwidth are you using?
How much are you paying for?
Are you able to use said bandwidth
indiscriminately?
Are their any limitations as to what applications
can use that bandwidth?
Were you made aware of these limitations?
before signing a one or two year contract?
Were you aware that limitations would only be for iPhone owners and not other AT&T subscribers? (Extra Credit: Would you have even believed that if you were told? :eek:)


And finally, what do AT&T's woes have to do with me?

Rodimus Prime
Sep 1, 2009, 03:04 PM
In the UK, O2 are already struggling to provide a network that can sustain demand. For the past 2 months I have been regularly unable to receive or make calls, SMS/MMS are severely delayed and the internet barely works despite living and working in HSDPA areas. O2's mobile broadband product is displaying the same symptoms which, according to customer services, is simply the result of too many users trying to connect in central London. It's not just London suffering either, the problem seems to be nation wide. I think Apple need to unravel the single carrier agreement sooner rather than later to help spread the load over more than just one network. WiFi hotspots offer little benefit to solving the problem - they're too often slower than 3G itself, or they just don't work.

all that will do is cause the same problem for everyone. Remember they rent towers from eat other. Other GSM careers could be use the exact same towers so same problem.

The cell network just is not able to keep up with demand. Data useage per user is growing exponentially. It is easy for a carrier to project new users in any given area but it is very diffucult for them to of projected the data explotion that hit everyone.

Remember the plans for the towers and upgrades have to be done YEARS in advance and because it was all laid out years ago no one projected the sudden surge in network demand.

Remember technology is very hard to project out more than a few months a head and when you expand that to 5 years it becomes near impossible 5 years ago it was not dreamed of that cells would have become mini computers like this and demand so much data.

severe
Sep 1, 2009, 03:07 PM
I think Apple need to unravel the single carrier agreement sooner rather than later to help spread the load over more than just one network. WiFi hotspots offer little benefit to solving the problem - they're too often slower than 3G itself, or they just don't work.

Me too.

Rodimus Prime
Sep 1, 2009, 03:12 PM
What are you yapping about? I don't need to learn a damn thing. Are you basing that comment on my "2+ years later and we finally just hear that they are working on it" statement? How's 'bout addressing my concerns.

I've stated the facts. AT&T are simply not holding up their end of the deal. I thought I made myself clear. I'm paying for a service they are not providing. Some call it bait and switch.

Allow me to pose a few questions:


How much bandwidth are you using?
How much are you paying for?
Are you able to use said bandwidth
indiscriminately?
Are their any limitations as to what applications
can use that bandwidth?
Were you made aware of these limitations?
before signing a one or two year contract?
Were you aware that these limitations would only be for iPhone owners and not other AT&T subscribers? (Extra Credit: Would you have even believed that if you were told? :eek:)


And finally, what do AT&T's woes have to do with me?

Yes you do. You need to see projections on how these towers are put up across the board and tell me 5 years ago could you of for seen this demand.

iPhone users use 4 times as much data as everyone else again not projected during launch and now 2 years later just starting to deal with it. Sounds about right for the amount of time it takes to get approval for things. City and state governments are very slow and issuing permits like that. I would say with in 6 months of iPhone launch AT&T started the ground work to get approval for more towers which like I said the time is measured in years not weeks or months so 2 years seems right.

AT&T woes have to do with you is just showing you what all the careers will be struggling with and starting to struggle with.

On top of all that the iPhone uses more network connection than other smart phones so again over taxes the system. The system world wide is not able to keep up with demand. I also pointed out just for internet on our home computers we are starting to max out bandwithe and they know they will struggle to keep up with demand. Cell phones just happen to not of been as far along when these limits popped up.

In this it is all about projection and the iPhone was on the first edge of smart phone revolution and as such a huge data demand explosion.

As for my data usage I do own an iPhone but a dumb phone for the next week or so then I am upgrading to a smartphone (not an iPhone) but my data usage on my dumb phone is 300-400 megs a month but I am streaming video over it all the time so it has some nasty demands. I know I tax the system and when I go smart it will only get worse. But I would still be under a gig a month.

cwt1nospam
Sep 1, 2009, 03:32 PM
Why are you guys arguing about towers? From the article it seems clear that the issue is the backbone, not the towers. Of course, I'm sure AT&T could use a few more towers too.

Rodimus Prime
Sep 1, 2009, 04:07 PM
Why are you guys arguing about towers? From the article it seems clear that the issue is the backbone, not the towers. Of course, I'm sure AT&T could use a few more towers too.


Towers are part of the backbone of the system.

But same issues over all. The system is over taxed everything I pointed out applies there as well.

cwt1nospam
Sep 1, 2009, 10:37 PM
There are wires between towers. I don't know the specs, but I doubt they'd want to waste bandwidth sending data from tower to tower over the air.

Rodimus Prime
Sep 1, 2009, 11:23 PM
There are wires between towers. I don't know the specs, but I doubt they'd want to waste bandwidth sending data from tower to tower over the air.

Well you need to remember sending information over the air is just not fast enough for the towers. Most of the power and limited bandwithe of the tower is dedicated to phones. Going over the air would cut the effectiviness of each tower in 1/2. Also do not forgot each tower needs a power lined to any how so laying ground work for a cable it not that bad since it can go in at the same time.