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forcesteeler
Oct 3, 2009, 05:29 PM
When do you think Apple will make a app store for OSX Applications?



codenamecueball
Oct 3, 2009, 05:33 PM
When do you think Apple will make a app store for OSX Applications?

Never.
Google serves a good purpose here... but its not a bad concept, i just doubt they would adopt it

celticpride678
Oct 3, 2009, 05:37 PM
Not officially by Apple, but here is one http://appbodega.com/

kainjow
Oct 3, 2009, 06:22 PM
If Apple ever makes an App Store for Mac OS X and forces that to be the only way to distribute your application, I will switch to Windows :)

iLoveDeveloping
Oct 3, 2009, 06:38 PM
Never is an option...?! They sell pretty dam well right now without an App store. Ever go into an Apple store??? There are Bookcases of OS X software. Selling something for a tiny portable device with small size programmes (most not more than 60mb) is VERY different than selling full package games and programmes from a desktop or macbook! You might be waiting some time!

Jeremy1026
Oct 3, 2009, 09:16 PM
But, if Apple did an app store for mac, forcesteeler could bitch about not getting paid quickly for mac sales also. :rolleyes:

larkost
Oct 3, 2009, 09:28 PM
I am also strongly opposed to an Apple run, or Apple-anointed, app store being the only source of Applications. But how about a middle road: what if Apple offered an app store that allowed a one-click purchase/download/install? A lot of people have problems installing even simple software (as in the whole Firefox install debate), and setting up an e-commerce site and setting copy protection can be a hassle for small developers. Having Apple come in and do it for some percentage of the cost might well be worth it for many people.

So a partial list of the benefits of such a sceme:

Easier install for users, might make an uninstall of these apps easy
Easier hosting of apps for developers and credit-card transactions (takes care of billing, hosting, returns, etc)
Provides catalog of applications for users, linked from Apple (many users don't know about MacUpdate/VersionTracker) - this includes some form of advertisement for the developer
Easy for users to know they are not getting a bad version of an app from an untrusted source
At least some minor approval process before listing of the apps insures some modicum of quality apps (but brings with it all the negatives of the approval process)


I am not completely sure I like this idea, and am strongly against it being the only way of getting apps, but I do see some attraction to the model as one avenue of getting apps.

GorillaPaws
Oct 4, 2009, 12:27 AM
I am also strongly opposed to an Apple run, or Apple-anointed, app store being the only source of Applications. But how about a middle road: what if Apple offered an app store that allowed a one-click purchase/download/install?

I second this. Certainly not as an exclusive means of distribution, but I agree that it would be nice as an option. Especially if they manage payment, licensing etc. I think it would be great exposure for indie developers, and would allow those who chose to participate to be able to focus more on their products and less on managing their distribution infrastructure.

GeneKam
Oct 4, 2009, 12:29 AM
Its going to be never. Software size (eg. 700 mb) is rediculous for servers. It simply wouldnt work. On top of that most companies need more then just apple advertising page. They have their site to display software in higher depth. ALSO, apple would be screwed on software, because dev would never pay money to apple to get their software hosted and sold when they can do it themselves for free.

PS: google or any other search engine will do same as app store minus categorizing it.

EDIT: If you look at some of the software, it is very big, a few gigs. It is mostly distributed via "hard" media. So as soon as the world goes all digital and drops all physical media, then it would be useful. Not any time soon though, new HVDare pretty good. 1TB storage, i hope they come out soon!

admanimal
Oct 4, 2009, 01:11 AM
The one and only potential benefit to developers that would make them choose App Store distribution over standard web distribution is exposure. Everything else about the App Store makes it a nightmare compared to standard channels.

HiRez
Oct 4, 2009, 01:25 AM
As an option is sounds like it'd be a good idea, especially for small developers.

There are probably a whole lot of issues with it though. For one example, volume licenses. I have no problem with Apple getting 30% of a single download for a single customer. But if someone orders 100 of them for their company, which I'm discounting, 30% on each one seems like too much when Apple really didn't do much extra for the additional licenses. Maybe a little extra bandwidth, that is if the customer didn't just do one download and distribute it themselves, but that's a lot less than 30% of the price of your product.

forcesteeler
Oct 4, 2009, 09:16 AM
But, if Apple did an app store for mac, forcesteeler could bitch about not getting paid quickly for mac sales also. :rolleyes:

Hell yeah!;)

temetrepo
Oct 4, 2009, 09:18 AM
i think there's a third party one named bodega :D

forcesteeler
Oct 4, 2009, 10:28 AM
Its going to be never. Software size (eg. 700 mb) is rediculous for servers.

I think Apple Itunes Servers can handle that. I mean aren't Movies especially HD Movies on the Itune store 2-6 GB each?

firewood
Oct 4, 2009, 02:34 PM
Might be an interesting idea for small developers who don't have any commercial web presence (fulfillment, advertising, etc.), and are distributing apps that aren't huge.

As a customer for small Mac utilities, I would prefer to just let Apple have my credit card and contact info, and not have to deal with paypal and etc. with a dozen small operations I've never heard of.

But the big software companies have better routes to potential customers.

thegoldenmackid
Oct 4, 2009, 02:35 PM
Brought up numerous times before. Cannot see it happening, no interest of the developers or Apple.

mongrol
Oct 4, 2009, 05:30 PM
When do you think Apple will make a app store for OSX Applications?

Hopefully never. An App Store for the Mac is one step closer to closing the platform and mandating all Apps through the store. We do not want a Mac App Store.

GorillaPaws
Oct 4, 2009, 05:49 PM
An App Store for the Mac is one step closer to closing the platform and mandating all Apps through the store.

Do you really think Apple thinks this strategy would be in it's best interest? I know Apple has control issues, but I would think they would be able to foresee the mass exodus from the platform that would result from implementing a closed platform strategy. Not only would you have developers leaving, but you would likely see millions of users leaving as well (I would be among them).

IBradMac
Oct 4, 2009, 05:54 PM
Search Google or here for apps.

Personally, finding apps to complete a task is all the more fun for me. To each their own.

rwilliams
Oct 4, 2009, 06:58 PM
Install an application called Bodega. It's basically an App Store for OS X.

Cloudane
Oct 4, 2009, 07:06 PM
It should never be the exclusive way of getting apps onto OS X. It'd kill the OS completely, and I'm sure Apple know that :)

But I do like the concept, and it wouldn't surprise me if it came into existence and became a popular distribution network. Apple have a habit of developing new hardware, letting it lead the way and then 'back-porting' some of the technology to their more long-standing products - or various techniques in between. I think we'll see a tablet running something in between the iPhone OS and the full desktop Mac OS X, with an app store of its own - and then they'll do a desktop one. But I definitely don't think it'll be forced.

mongrol
Oct 4, 2009, 10:55 PM
It should never be the exclusive way of getting apps onto OS X. It'd kill the OS completely, and I'm sure Apple know that :)

But I do like the concept, and it wouldn't surprise me if it came into existence and became a popular distribution network. Apple have a habit of developing new hardware, letting it lead the way and then 'back-porting' some of the technology to their more long-standing products - or various techniques in between. I think we'll see a tablet running something in between the iPhone OS and the full desktop Mac OS X, with an app store of its own - and then they'll do a desktop one. But I definitely don't think it'll be forced.

If they implement it gradually in stages then I'm sure they could do it. The tablet is going to be App Store only for definite. After that they release a Netbook style machine somewhere between the Tablet and the Macbook. Same deal, closed App Store. It's acceptable and one step closer. Slowly more consumer orientated Laptops are phased out to be replaced by new models that too, follow the closed App store strategy.

Before you realise because it's happening over years rather than big bang the entire platform is closed off. Customers will remain, some will leave but Apple won't care as the returns are too great for them to ignore.

A closed Mac App Store is a no brainer for apple and it WILL happen.

GorillaPaws
Oct 5, 2009, 02:05 AM
If they implement it gradually in stages then I'm sure they could do it. The tablet is going to be App Store only for definite. After that they release a Netbook style machine somewhere between the Tablet and the Macbook. Same deal, closed App Store. It's acceptable and one step closer. Slowly more consumer orientated Laptops are phased out to be replaced by new models that too, follow the closed App store strategy.

Before you realise because it's happening over years rather than big bang the entire platform is closed off. Customers will remain, some will leave but Apple won't care as the returns are too great for them to ignore.

A closed Mac App Store is a no brainer for apple and it WILL happen.

I do agree that this is how Apple would most likely implement a lockdown of OSX if they wanted to go in that direction.

I strongly disagree that Apple thinks this would be in their best interest. The loss in hardware sales from disgruntled users, the decrease in available 3rd party software from disgruntled developers and the all-around bad press/vibe this would generate in the computing world would be an unmitigated disaster. The stock price would plummet.

Apple may not always make the best decisions, but it's not run by morons. The vast majority of its profit is generated through hardware sales, and even a 30% cut of all 3rd party software would pale in comparison to the losses from the subsequent reductions in hardware sales (especially when you factor in the costs of running the approval department and the other overhead).

Also, consider what Adobe, Autodesk, Microsoft etc. would do if OSX went completely closed. I don't see them accepting a 30% bite into their revenues, so they would either have to jack up prices to maintain profits, or (more likely) pack-up and leave. Assuming they did stick around and raised prices to compensate, Macs would gain the reputation of having an "Apple Tax" where all 3rd-party software was ~30% more expensive than the same products on other platforms. This would certainly hurt the overall market-share, and ultimately Apple's bottom line. I'd like to think that Steve, the board and the other higher-ups are smart enough to have considered this.

forcesteeler
Oct 5, 2009, 07:58 AM
I like the idea of centralizing software

Darkroom
Oct 5, 2009, 08:19 AM
apple currently has the Downloads (http://www.apple.com/ca/downloads/) section on their site. i've been actually anticipating them to push for mac software by integrating their downloads site to an iTunes app store for mac. of course it wouldn't be as streamlined as the iPhone App Store, since apple doesn't actually host the software from the Downloads section on their server, nor do they sell the software themselves. contrary to recent rumors, if their upcoming tablet computer does end up having snow leopard installed (or some variation), i could definitely see an app store for mac software being built into iTunes that's reflective of their Downloads section.

whooleytoo
Oct 5, 2009, 09:39 AM
As a developer with a small company, I think it would be a great idea. Obviously, as long as it's an option and not the sole method of OSX app delivery.

The convenience of the centralised store, allied to the buzz it would generate in Mac software sales, would be massive boons for both user & developer, IMO.

Cloudane
Oct 5, 2009, 11:20 AM
I strongly disagree that Apple thinks this would be in their best interest. The loss in hardware sales from disgruntled users, the decrease in available 3rd party software from disgruntled developers and the all-around bad press/vibe this would generate in the computing world would be an unmitigated disaster. The stock price would plummet.

I agree with this assessment.

Users might not be so much of a problem - we all know by now that we do things the way Apple tell us to :p

But it could be a deal breaker for likes of Adobe, and I'm sure Apple are well aware that they've annoyed them enough already (http://www.tuaw.com/2008/04/03/apple-adobe-and-64-bit-photoshop/) and can't afford to lose them.

kainjow
Oct 5, 2009, 11:36 AM
The problem is it doesn't give you any freedom. I like being able to make a build, put it up on my server, and send people the URL without any kind of delay. You can't do that with the app store concept.

whooleytoo
Oct 5, 2009, 11:40 AM
The problem is it doesn't give you any freedom. I like being able to make a build, put it up on my server, and send people the URL without any kind of delay. You can't do that with the app store concept.

Only if the App Store is your sole distribution model. If Apple offered the App Store as an option, you'd still be free to offer your software for download through your site as well.

forcesteeler
Oct 6, 2009, 03:34 PM
If we have a OSX App store. Everyone will have more exposure and make more money.

mongrol
Oct 6, 2009, 05:16 PM
I agree with this assessment.

Users might not be so much of a problem - we all know by now that we do things the way Apple tell us to :p

But it could be a deal breaker for likes of Adobe, and I'm sure Apple are well aware that they've annoyed them enough already (http://www.tuaw.com/2008/04/03/apple-adobe-and-64-bit-photoshop/) and can't afford to lose them.

All consumer devices will be closed platform through the App Store. The XServer management tools will be expanded to include an Enterprise Level App management toolset just like it exists today for Corporate iPhones.

Let's face it, Apple will lose some power users and open platform purists through this strategy but the vast majority of Mac owners are ordinary iTunes users. They would welcome an App Store for mac completely oblivious to the implications for developers. Developers as well may say they'll leave the platform, but as the iPhone proves, other developers will flood in filling the gap and hoping the game the system.

Cloudane
Oct 6, 2009, 06:38 PM
I think they would *maybe* do that for the lower end Macs - things like the cheapest of the MacBook. But I doubt it really, too much of an outcry - IMHO anyway :)

forcesteeler
Oct 11, 2009, 01:16 PM
All consumer devices will be closed platform through the App Store. The XServer management tools will be expanded to include an Enterprise Level App management toolset just like it exists today for Corporate iPhones.

Let's face it, Apple will lose some power users and open platform purists through this strategy but the vast majority of Mac owners are ordinary iTunes users. They would welcome an App Store for mac completely oblivious to the implications for developers. Developers as well may say they'll leave the platform, but as the iPhone proves, other developers will flood in filling the gap and hoping the game the system.

It will Spar development. Digital Distrubtion is the Future.

chown33
Oct 11, 2009, 01:42 PM
It will Spar development. Digital Distrubtion is the Future.

Digital Distribution is the Present.

You can already submit your app for listing on Apple's Downloads web page.

http://www.apple.com/downloads/

The link for submitting apps is near the bottom of the page, labeled "Submit Downloads".

This area of the Apple site has been around for years. Much longer than the App Store, in fact. If it hasn't spurred development, or been a fabulous way to get your app "discovered", you should ask yourself why not.

BadWolf13
Mar 5, 2010, 02:05 PM
Partially opposed to a mac app store. I like the idea that it offers cheap/free advertising for the beginner app developers. But I think Apple already does that on their website, allowing posting of Apps based on their catagories. What I really don't want to see is Apple having to approve every application you install on your mac, like they do with the iPhone. I severely dislike that thought, but I also don't see it as being likely, given the very open nature of the Unix base that OSX is built on.

The problem is it doesn't give you any freedom. I like being able to make a build, put it up on my server, and send people the URL without any kind of delay. You can't do that with the app store concept.

That's very good kainjow, but not everyone has a server to put it up on. That's why having an OPTIONAL app store would help the small/new developers to make some business and thus allow them to grow into an operation that can afford a server.

Cromulent
Mar 5, 2010, 02:51 PM
That's very good kainjow, but not everyone has a server to put it up on. That's why having an OPTIONAL app store would help the small/new developers to make some business and thus allow them to grow into an operation that can afford a server.

The problem is that although it may start out as optional customers may well decide to only buy from the app store which forces developers hands somewhat.

Frankly though the cost of a dedicated server nowadays is pretty low starting at about 35 a month for a self managed one with non-premium bandwidth and a shared commit. Any serious developer and especially one selling their work better have a server to host their apps for security and flexibilty more than anything else.

BadWolf13
Mar 5, 2010, 03:02 PM
Frankly though the cost of a dedicated server nowadays is pretty low starting at about 35 a month for a self managed one with non-premium bandwidth and a shared commit. Any serious developer and especially one selling their work better have a server to host their apps for security and flexibilty more than anything else.

But that's just the server itself, doesn't include the cost of hiring someone to create and maintain the site. Most app developers are programmers, not graphic designers. I've seen some of the websites that small developers keep, and they are really unprofessional, and that just drives customers away.

Cromulent
Mar 5, 2010, 03:19 PM
But that's just the server itself, doesn't include the cost of hiring someone to create and maintain the site. Most app developers are programmers, not graphic designers. I've seen some of the websites that small developers keep, and they are really unprofessional, and that just drives customers away.

It's not that expensive. You can just do some custom modding of Wordpress to add a few extra features and then pay a designer to make it look pretty. If you shop around you'd probably be able to find someone to do it for you for a very reasonable price.

GorillaPaws
Mar 5, 2010, 03:22 PM
But that's just the server itself, doesn't include the cost of hiring someone to create and maintain the site. Most app developers are programmers, not graphic designers. I've seen some of the websites that small developers keep, and they are really unprofessional, and that just drives customers away.

Even if you're selling exclusively on the hypothetical mac app store, you're still going to need a professional looking website. The real boon in my mind is not having to setup and manage the payment-processing infrastructure, deal with international variations in tax rules (VAT for example), and all of the other headaches that go along with that. Also there have been issues with some of the existing payment processors freezing accounts which can become a real nightmare for an indie developer.

I would also hope that Apple would offer some type of serial license scheme as an option. I can see a lot of good things about this, but I realize that Apple could also make some decisions that could be pretty devastating.

As I've said earlier in the thread, as long as it's not the ONLY means of distribution, I'm all for it.

forcesteeler
Oct 20, 2010, 04:06 PM
my wish has come true

Cromulent
Oct 20, 2010, 04:14 PM
my wish has come true

Well, I'll be interested to see how it pans out. I'll be especially interested to see what (if any) restrictions are in place on the Mac app store. It would be somewhat stupid to limit apps to just Objective-C, C and C++ on the Mac app store when Mac OS X comes with Java, Python and Ruby built in and it is fairly easy to integrate any number of other languages into your programs.

kainjow
Oct 20, 2010, 05:26 PM
Looks like App Store is continuing Apple's new theme started with iTunes 10 of putting the close/etc widgets in a weird new location. Notice the window doesn't even have a title bar?

http://www.apple.com/mac/app-store/

Will be interesting to see if this becomes a new window style, similar to the metal style.

One thing I think I'd like is not having to bundle Sparkle in every app I distribute. Auto-updates built-in to the system will be nice.

jared_kipe
Oct 20, 2010, 07:17 PM
Well, I'll be interested to see how it pans out. I'll be especially interested to see what (if any) restrictions are in place on the Mac app store. It would be somewhat stupid to limit apps to just Objective-C, C and C++ on the Mac app store when Mac OS X comes with Java, Python and Ruby built in and it is fairly easy to integrate any number of other languages into your programs.

As already stated on developer.apple.com Your app will be rejected if it uses optional software including JAVA or Rosetta.

Cromulent
Oct 21, 2010, 03:07 AM
As already stated on developer.apple.com Your app will be rejected if it uses optional software including JAVA or Rosetta.

Where did you get a list of the specifics for Mac OS X App Store distribution?

Sydde
Oct 21, 2010, 03:16 AM
Notice the window doesn't even have a title bar?

http://www.apple.com/mac/app-store/

Nor a toolbar button. Either a new Lion style option, or a work in progress, subject to change.

MorphingDragon
Oct 21, 2010, 03:20 AM
Nor a toolbar button. Either a new Lion style option, or a work in progress, subject to change.

I think Apple is just experimenting with different UI styles.

steviem
Oct 21, 2010, 07:52 AM
Never.
Google serves a good purpose here... but its not a bad concept, i just doubt they would adopt it

I love quoting shortsighted responses....

Although, on the other hand, look at this: http://developer.apple.com/programs/mac/software.html

$99 and you get access to prerelease Apple Software. Why the need for ADC?

robbieduncan
Oct 21, 2010, 08:00 AM
I love quoting shortsighted responses....

Although, on the other hand, look at this: http://developer.apple.com/programs/mac/software.html

$99 and you get access to prerelease Apple Software. Why the need for ADC?

There is no ADC anymore. The Mac Developer Program replaced it earlier this year.

Cromulent
Oct 21, 2010, 08:01 AM
I love quoting shortsighted responses....


Short sighted, maybe. But then this announcement by Apple could have significant ramifications on the Mac developer community.

jeznav
Oct 21, 2010, 08:29 AM
As an indie game developer, I like the idea. Actually I was wishing for this to happen just like how Steam games are distributed.

Although I can host the binaries on a web server, there is very little amount of chance of getting discovered in the oceans of the internet. So I have to advertise as best as I can submitting links to download sites which barely makes sales unlike the AppStore model where your software goes to the user directly.

Jessica Lares
Oct 21, 2010, 08:43 AM
I personally think it's going to be easier to be accepted in the Mac App Store than in the iTunes App Store. I posted a blog post (http://www.jessicalares.com/dear-future-os-x-developers-taking-advantage-of-the-mac-app-store/) about it yesterday. :P.

While OS X and iOS are built almost the same graphically/same developing tool/etc, they have two different audiences and usages. I think a lot of new developers will be hit with those kind of rejection letters once they try and adapt stuff like Angry Birds/Tap Tap Revenge to OS X. It just doesn't work.

Maybe we have just indeed lost a lot of freedom, but I think we're headed in a good direction. Especially as more and more people start moving to the Mac system, we need to keep hacking as minimal as possible. With so many old packages of software floating around out there still and new users not aware of PowerPC, it needs to be made simpler for them to find the software they need.

whooleytoo
Oct 21, 2010, 09:54 AM
I think the Mac App store, could be huge for the Mac.

It'll be great for promoting small indie Mac apps.
It'll bring a lot of activity and hype back into Mac software.
It could bring a lot of 'micro transactions' into the Mac market. Does a shareware developer want to get a few hundred paid users via their own website, or perhaps tens of thousands (at a cheaper price) through the Mac App Store.

It all depends on if the Apple Hype (or should that be iPe) takes off.

Hamshrew
Oct 21, 2010, 09:58 AM
A few toolkits exist out there to make cross-platform development easier. I'm not talking about Java, but about things like Qt's C++ framework, which makes it pretty easy to make an app and compile it for Windows and Mac, and both look and feel like a native application. What I can't seem to find out(without paying $100) is if an app written in Qt and C++ would be allowed in the App Store. Does it need to be statically linked, or is a .app package with the necessary DLLs good enough? Is it even allowed? I don't see the point of paying for a developer's license only to find out that I can't. They really need to post more information about this.

robbieduncan
Oct 21, 2010, 10:08 AM
A few toolkits exist out there to make cross-platform development easier. I'm not talking about Java, but about things like Qt's C++ framework, which makes it pretty easy to make an app and compile it for Windows and Mac, and both look and feel like a native application. What I can't seem to find out(without paying $100) is if an app written in Qt and C++ would be allowed in the App Store. Does it need to be statically linked, or is a .app package with the necessary DLLs good enough? Is it even allowed? I don't see the point of paying for a developer's license only to find out that I can't. They really need to post more information about this.

1) Don't kid yourself. It doesn't feel like a native app. It feels 90-95% like a native app and then you hit a jarring inconsistency

2) The entire pre-release approval guidelines are public: http://www.cultofmac.com/apples-mac-app-store-approval-guidelines/65022

So reading the link from 2) you might be able to get away with using something like QT as long as you don't need the libraries to be outside the application bundle (embedded frameworks should be OK). But note you must (see condition 6.1, 6.3) fully comply with the HIG and use system provided buttons/controls. If QT is using some sort of image-based skin instead of the real controls it might not be allowed.

Hamshrew
Oct 21, 2010, 10:13 AM
1) Don't kid yourself. It doesn't feel like a native app. It feels 90-95% like a native app and then you hit a jarring inconsistency

2) The entire pre-release approval guidelines are public: http://www.cultofmac.com/apples-mac-app-store-approval-guidelines/65022

So reading the link from 2) you might be able to get away with using something like QT as long as you don't need the libraries to be outside the application bundle (embedded frameworks should be OK). But note you must (see condition 6.1, 6.3) fully comply with the HIG and use system provided buttons/controls. If QT is using some sort of image-based skin instead of the real controls it might not be allowed.

Thanks, that link in point 2 is exactly what I was looking for. I'll have to read carefully about the HIG stuff, but I don't think 6.3 is a problem. Qt uses the native widgets of the system it's on, that's one of its touted advantages.

Cromulent
Oct 21, 2010, 11:11 AM
that's one of its touted advantages.

Let us hope reality and marketing speak coincide :).

kainjow
Oct 21, 2010, 11:44 AM
After reading the guidelines, almost every product I work on will not be allowed in, and these are major products.

Apple is really forcing the self-contained app idea now, devs can't get away with installing random crap onto your machine (although for certain things this is a requirement, hence several apps not being allowed in).

I've got an open-source game I've been tinkering with on and off for a while now. If the App Store was free I'd be 100% in on using it as another distribution source, but at $99? This will just force devs to start integrating iAds into their freeware apps (when they become available). Don't think anyone wants that on their desktop.

jared_kipe
Oct 21, 2010, 11:52 AM
My biggest disappointment is that they didn't offer a way to port iOS apps directly to MacOS via some kind of resolution independence and packaging x86 code in with the arm code.

Jessica Lares
Oct 21, 2010, 12:40 PM
My biggest disappointment is that they didn't offer a way to port iOS apps directly to MacOS via some kind of resolution independence and packaging x86 code in with the arm code.

NO, NO, NO, please no. If Lion was truly multi-touch, YES, but it's not. It'd be like using Android on a PC in a sense that everything's HUGE.

briloronmacrumo
Oct 21, 2010, 12:41 PM
As an indie developer with registration protection on my apps, I'm interested in:

1. Since apps cannot be copy protected on the new Mac App store, how will Apple protect apps from being copied to multiple Macs?

Anyone know?

Brian S.

Also, while all my code is CF, CG and written in C ( compiled with gcc or clang ), the UI is carbon nibs. I've yet to read Apple guidance on whether the Mac app store will reject based on carbon nibs.

Smileyboy
Oct 21, 2010, 12:51 PM
Doe this mean no side loading of apps?

jared_kipe
Oct 21, 2010, 12:51 PM
NO, NO, NO, please no. If Lion was truly multi-touch, YES, but it's not. It'd be like using Android on a PC in a sense that everything's HUGE.

Not every developer ties their user interface in heavily with multi touch. In fact my apps are very usable in the simulator just with mouse and apple's scrollwheel integration (for scrolling down tableviews). You can even pinch gesture holding down option not that I'd ever want to force people to do that.

Why would everything be huge, if the app supports any size UI let the user resize the window. If the app supports iPad size, make the window the same size as an ipad (ala the simulator), and if not just make the window the same size as an iOS 4 simulator either size.

Jessica Lares
Oct 21, 2010, 01:53 PM
I don't know, I find that it would look a bit weird. It's something that would work on Dashboard, but not as a standalone application.

jared_kipe
Oct 21, 2010, 02:06 PM
I don't know, I find that it would look a bit weird. It's something that would work on Dashboard, but not as a standalone application.

It would be something the developers could opt in for, meaning they would write their software around the paradigm of running on both MacOSX and iOS (provided apple gave us the ability to do that)