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View Full Version : Which book to buy or should I buy another?




Zombie Acorn
Oct 7, 2009, 04:59 PM
Currently I have Kochan's Objective-C 2.0, I haven't started in yet (except for the introductory chapter) as I am still waiting for my macbook to arrive and I sold my mac mini a while ago. I also have a book "Cocoa programming for mac os x" and "Beginning development for the iphone".

I am wondering if I should also get a book on C, I noticed Kochan has one out, and there is another one that seems to be very popular by Kernighan (C Programming Language).

Any recs on whether I should pick up another book? I don't know how in depth Kochan goes into C in his objective-c book so I am just curious how anyone who started out with the book felt. I have a pretty firm grasp on object oriented concepts, but C++ is the lowest I have went in programming languages with most of my time being spent on C#.



skochan
Oct 7, 2009, 09:45 PM
If you have a background in C# and C++, you shouldn't need a book on C. In any case, why don't you start with my book, which doesn't assume any background at all with C. There's a chapter later in the book on the underlying C language features. When you get to that point you can decide if you want to supplement your knowledge with a dedicated C text.

Anyway, since I wrote the Objective-C book, my opinion is obviously biased, so hopefully others will chime in. :-)

Best of luck,

Steve Kochan
P.S. Be sure to join the forum for the book at classroomM.com/objective-c.

Zombie Acorn
Oct 7, 2009, 10:15 PM
If you have a background in C# and C++, you shouldn't need a book on C. In any case, why don't you start with my book, which doesn't assume any background at all with C. There's a chapter later in the book on the underlying C language features. When you get to that point you can decide if you want to supplement your knowledge with a dedicated C text.

Anyway, since I wrote the Objective-C book, my opinion is obviously biased, so hopefully others will chime in. :-)

Best of luck,

Steve Kochan
P.S. Be sure to joint the forum for the book at classroomM.com/objective-c.

Wow, never expected to get an answer from the author himself :D. I have heard good things about your objective-c book so I am sure I will not be disappointed. Thanks for taking the time to reply to an objective-c newb such as myself, much appreciated.

mdeh
Oct 7, 2009, 11:08 PM
Currently I have Kochan's Objective-C 2.0, I haven't started in yet (except for the introductory chapter) as I am still waiting for my macbook to arrive and I sold my mac mini a while ago. I also have a book "Cocoa programming for mac os x" and "Beginning development for the iphone".



Steve Kochan's book is **great** as both an introduction/refresher to C as well as to Objective-C ( which is merely a superset of C). Not only that , it introduces you to the Foundation Framework. I would start with that....it will be a pleasure reading it and learning from it...but then I am biased, as I really liked his book. Make sure to go to his website, where just about any queries you have about the chapters will be answered. Lastly, the author ( as you have alreadly seen) is a real gentleman, always willing to explain things you do not fully understand.

Zombie Acorn
Oct 8, 2009, 03:35 AM
Steve Kochan's book is **great** as both an introduction/refresher to C as well as to Objective-C ( which is merely a superset of C). Not only that , it introduces you to the Foundation Framework. I would start with that....it will be a pleasure reading it and learning from it...but then I am biased, as I really liked his book. Make sure to go to his website, where just about any queries you have about the chapters will be answered. Lastly, the author ( as you have alreadly seen) is a real gentleman, always willing to explain things you do not fully understand.

great, sounds like I am set then, thanks.

MorphingDragon
Oct 8, 2009, 04:39 AM
I'd recommend getting the Steven Kochan book and the Aaron Hillegass Book. SK gives a nice sow introduction but AH goes into further detail of Cocoa than SK.

chrono1081
Oct 8, 2009, 06:03 AM
+1 for the Kochan book.

I used to program in C but I would suggest not worrying about C unless you really want to. Most programming is object oriented now-days (for a good reason) and learning structured programming, then moving to object oriented can be confusing if your new to programming.

The Kochan book may be a hair tricky at first if youve never programmed because it starts with classes. Just work through it though and if you dont understand something dont stay hung up on it. A lot of concepts will click when you see them applied elsewhere.