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View Full Version : 12 Steps to Improving Your Mac's Performance


MacBytes
Jul 22, 2004, 08:03 PM
Category: Tips and How To\'s
Link: 12 Steps to Improving Your Mac\'s Performance (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20040722210358)
Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)

Approved by Mudbug

broken_keyboard
Jul 22, 2004, 08:30 PM
What awful advice. I was hoping for something a bit more substantial.

bbarnhart
Jul 22, 2004, 09:44 PM
This article was full of benign advise. How does having spam or a lot of e-mail for that matter make your computer slow? Not allowing a hard drive to become "full" is good advise. Mac OS X automatically de-fragments your HD and will stop if the drive becomes full. Running repair disk permissions is also good advise. Everything else was just filler or common sense.

Earendil
Jul 22, 2004, 10:21 PM
chalk up another vote for "stupid article".

Tyler
Earendil

b.k.jackson
Jul 22, 2004, 11:12 PM
I hate to "me too" comments, but this was god awful. Hopefully the author will take some time to learn about the operating system that she's writing about in the future and post some constructive comments instead of "windows maintenance 101" rehashed.

geesh.

Brian

awulf
Jul 22, 2004, 11:57 PM
Installing a virus scanner for system that has no viruses available is a bit pointless in increasing the speed.

This article was disappointing I was hoping it actually had some real information on optimising your mac.

lduncan
Jul 23, 2004, 12:52 AM
what a load of ****! Just goes to show how worthless MCSE certification really is!

Layton

shadowfax
Jul 23, 2004, 02:42 AM
Still, my powerbook is a lot slower than it was a year ago. I think defragmentation, eventually, is good advice. the file system isn't prone to fragmentation, but not impervious to it either.

*fishes around for diskwarrior*

broken_keyboard
Jul 23, 2004, 07:41 AM
Mac OS X has on the fly defragmentation
http://www.kernelthread.com/mac/apme/optimizations/

The author didn't research too well...

Fender2112
Jul 23, 2004, 08:46 AM
Hey guys, don't be so harsh. Not all folks are as informed as those of us on these formums. Most of it seems basic to us but to the technically challenged there is good info in the article.

Many of you have been saying that OS X automaticly defragments. While this may be true, I always notice a performance boost when I run Norton Speed Disk. I think this is most helpful when I do house cleaning (as the artical mentions). I get rid of alot of things I don't need or don't use. Then do a backup, and finish up with Speed Disk. They key to Speed Disk is to start up from a different drive. This allows Speed Disk to totally optimize the drive, not just defragment.

fabsgwu
Jul 23, 2004, 08:48 AM
Mac OS X has on the fly defragmentation
http://www.kernelthread.com/mac/apme/optimizations/

The author didn't research too well...

ou beat me to it. I've had some nightmare problems with Norton utilities 7.0 agmenter (because at the time it was still written for OS 9 even though they were claiming it "works" with 10) and I'm skeptical about jumping into using a third party app that messes with OS files. I do wish, however, that apple would provide some more substantial maintenance utilities preinstalled.

themadchemist
Jul 23, 2004, 07:13 PM
my life is changed, woooooow

wdlove
Jul 24, 2004, 12:30 PM
Hey guys, don't be so harsh. Not all folks are as informed as those of us on these forums. Most of it seems basic to us but to the technically challenged there is good info in the article.

Many of you have been saying that OS X automatically defragments. While this may be true, I always notice a performance boost when I run Norton Speed Disk. I think this is most helpful when I do house cleaning (as the article mentions). I get rid of alot of things I don't need or don't use. Then do a backup, and finish up with Speed Disk. They key to Speed Disk is to start up from a different drive. This allows Speed Disk to totally optimize the drive, not just defragment.

I agree there are those that aren't Tech Savvy, so this information can be very helpful. The article is sent to a large audience. So there are bound to be some that consider the information to be below them.

Earendil
Jul 24, 2004, 12:46 PM
I don't think the tech savvy are saying this is "useless" information, though obviously there is some stuff there, like virus software is a MUST, that isn't all that important. It's that the Title, and what the Article was supposed to be about, did not at all apply to what the article contained. None of the things the mention will "speed up" anyones Mac.


Tyler
Earendil

themadchemist
Jul 24, 2004, 05:07 PM
I don't think the tech savvy are saying this is "useless" information, though obviously there is some stuff there, like virus software is a MUST, that isn't all that important. It's that the Title, and what the Article was supposed to be about, did not at all apply to what the article contained. None of the things the mention will "speed up" anyones Mac.


Tyler
Earendil

Very true...The article would have been more true to its title if it had instructed us on how to make a g5-sized catapult.