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View Full Version : PB + Class + Audio Recording = ?


Earendil
Jul 27, 2004, 11:57 AM
A good idea?
A bad idea?
Illegal?
Unethical?

After recording a few conversations at work with my PB, I realized it would probably be feasible to record classes while at college. I'm sure this isn't a new idea by any means, but I'm curious how well it works out. I head to college next fall, and I've been Self Educated my entire life. Homework will be a cinch, but I've never set foot in a class room (aside from DriversEd and Ground School). Recording a class sounds like a very beneficial way to get the most out of a very new experience.

But, I just read the other day that some (or maybe all?) colleges/classes don't allow recording. Does this mean that they won't allow computers in class? Or will they try and catch me using an recording program? Or perhaps it's one of those "rules" that generally no one gives a rip about unless you show to class with a T-Shirt that reads "I record classes", a PB, and a pillow?

Anyone have any experience in this area?

Tyler
Earendil

LeeTom
Jul 27, 2004, 12:01 PM
I think it's up to the individual professor. Why don't you ask him before the lecture, then respect his wishes. Also, in the nicest way possible, I suggest you change your attitude from "homework will be a cinch" and the me vs. them attitude, and focus on working your ass off to put in as much as possible into your studies, as you will get WAY more out of it. I'm just saying this because I had that attitude, and it got me nowhere!

Lee Tom

Earendil
Jul 27, 2004, 01:18 PM
I think it's up to the individual professor. Why don't you ask him before the lecture, then respect his wishes. Also, in the nicest way possible, I suggest you change your attitude from "homework will be a cinch" and the me vs. them attitude, and focus on working your ass off to put in as much as possible into your studies, as you will get WAY more out of it. I'm just saying this because I had that attitude, and it got me nowhere!

Lee Tom

Aside from being confused as to where you got the "Me vs Them" attitude of mine from, I believe "Cinch" was the perfect word within the context of what I was saying. In all due respect, 100% of my education has been done in a small, cramped, noisy, 6 person family environment. My HS education has been done on my own time schedule. I wasn't forced to do school, I had to force myself. I foresee my transition to dorm life and dealing with hw to be easier for me than some kids, and at the same time my transition to class rooms and note taking to be harder. Perhaps I'm off base here...

I was not, on the other hand, saying that all my college home work will be easy to finish and complete, just as I wasn't saying that class room work is going to be exceedingly difficult. I was referring to the personal adaption of new environments, and in the case of class rooms, how recording it may help. I apologize if you took my first post to mean anything else.

I will surely clear everything with a professor... But I have zero experience with what the "flow" of everything is going to be, and obviously the first day of class will probably be my hardest when it comes to adapting. I was attempting to get information about this subject before the first day, perhaps I am looking in the wrong place...

Tyler
Earendil

blackfox
Jul 27, 2004, 01:33 PM
I am curious as to how this will relate to note-taking. Is it a substitute for, or an augmentation of?

I do not know what kind of Learner you are (ie Audio or Visual), but for me the act of writing imprints information better in my head than just listening, and in terms of studying is much easier to work with. Note-taking also helps immeasureably in learning how to condense spoken word into somewhat condensed and edited wording, which has some relevance to the act of writng and editing papers (ie it helps ones' critical listening and thinking skills).

This is all based off my own experiences, but I would find listening to recorded lectures etc. a unwieldy and time-consuming way of studying.

Are you suggesting that you wish to record the lectures so you do not have to attend class at all? I feel that is a mistake, as you miss out on the chance to ask questions, or on any visual (or non-audio) cues that may add to context or understanding. You will also miss out on the social/cooperative nature of some classes and of College in general, which I feel is a mistake...

If you do wish to continue to learn on your own time and schedule, then I would suggest looking into Extension/correspondence/internet classes. Most Colleges allow anywhere from 25 - 50 credits done in this way.

Hope this helps...

LeeTom
Jul 27, 2004, 01:41 PM
hey, nothing personal man. i picked up on some things, correctly or incorrectly, and commented on them. i just suggest making a personal connection with each professor and talking with them about your idea.

i bet a lot of them will suggest that you take notes instead. it works well for getting the ideas in your head!

Lee Tom

Earendil
Jul 27, 2004, 01:48 PM
I am curious as to how this will relate to note-taking. Is it a substitute for, or an augmentation of?

It will be an addition to note taking.

I do not know what kind of Learner you are (ie Audio or Visual), but for me the act of writing imprints information better in my head than just listening, and in terms of studying is much easier to work with.

I'm the same as you, I'm very visual, and writing will help a bunch.

This is all based off my own experiences, but I would find listening to recorded lectures etc. a unwieldy and time-consuming way of studying.

I'm sure in time I will agree with you on that point!

Are you suggesting that you wish to record the lectures so you do not have to attend class at all?

Nope, I wouldn't dream of doing that. For starters that would mean loaning out my PB ;)

If you do wish to continue to learn on your own time and schedule, then I would suggest looking into Extension/correspondence/internet classes. Most Colleges allow anywhere from 25 - 50 credits done in this way.

I'm set and psyched up for college.
I'm toying with the idea of recording classes, because my worst fears tell me that I'm going to walk into something very new, and until I adjust myself some classes might overwhelm me. I fear I may walk out of a class only having a few things scribbled down and not actually having attained any knowledge. Note taking to me at this point has been done from a book, and not from a professor who probably won't wait when I ask him to stop so I can finish writing down what he/she said ;)

But, even in the worst case, I'll be able to go back and listen to everything that was said and hopefully better understand what was going only. Comp Sci may not be worth recording, because though it be hard, it shouldn't (I would hope) go over my head. While to the contrary, it may be beneficial to record Spanish.

Perhaps I sell myself short. But I've always been one to be as prepared as possible.

Hope this helps...

Immensely, thank you!

Tyler
earendil

blackfox
Jul 27, 2004, 02:06 PM
Tyler,

I was glad to be of some help...

One point regarding your worries on your initial note-taking abilities (or lack thereof)...it may be a good initial idea to cover your bases by recording your lectures, but it is also a good (perhaps better) idea to get to know your classmates. One of the reasons a college classroom environment is superior to independent study is that you are exposed to the multiple opinions/learning styles of not only the professors, but of your fellow classmates. This diversity can often be very beneficial to the evolvement of your critical-thinking and learning skills. In regards to notes in particular, you can always share/borrow notes from your classmates, as they might occasionally borrow/share yours...both covering your bases and exposing you to some social networking/teamwork skills/different analyses.

Do not be to hard on yourself, it you are only a Freshman, you will probably be astounded at the simplicity of some class material and the realtive lack of scholastic focus by many (by no means all) of your classmates. You should do very well.

I might add that you should take advantage of your college's resources also...as in mentors (to help with understanding/study skills) advisors (to help with efficient integration and progress) and TA's which often are willing to help and may have more time than your professors. Also take advantage of Professor's office hours to talk to he/she about specific needs/problems/questions you might have.

Although I hardly need to tell you this, thinking outside of the box is also helpful and the student library and regular libraries are an excellent resource for supplemental information.

The one thing professors cannot teach (although they try) is motivation. If you have that, then you will do excellent. Where are you attending BTW? And for what degree?