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edesignuk
Nov 9, 2009, 10:14 AM
My dad has my old Power Mac G4 'Quicksilver' from 2002 (dual 1GHz). He's run out of room on the 120GB drives currently installed and I need to find the best way to give him more space.

I was aware of the 128GB limit of the older Power Mac's (and this is why I went 2 x 120GB a couple of years back).

Now I'm wondering if the 128GB limit actually applies to this Mac, because of this (http://forums.macnn.com/65/mac-pro-and-power-mac/246391/the-power-mac-storage-faq/):
In 2002, Apple adopted a newer IDE controller with the QuickSilver '2002' model that made use of 48-bit addressing, thus alleviating the 128GB barrier and allowing the use of IDE drives in excess of 250GBs+. If you own one of the following Power Macintosh models, you're free to roam the storage prairie with no restraints;

Power Macintosh G4 - QuickSilver '2002' (800MHz, 933MHz, Dual 1GHz)
Power Macintosh G4 - MDD '2002' (Dual 867MHz, Dual 1GHz, Dual 1.25GHz)
Power Macintosh G4 - MDD '2003' (Single 1GHz, Dual 1.25GHz, Dual 1.42GHz)This gives me some confidence but I don't want to just take their word for it and have my dad go buy drives he can't use.

So, does anyone know if drives larger than 128GB will work in a 2002 Quicksilver (without need need for additional controllers)? Has anyone done it?

Thanks.



product26
Nov 9, 2009, 11:50 AM
you will need a pci card to use larger drives.

I would recommend getting a SATA card to take advantage of sata speeds and drive availability.

You can get the

FirmTek SeriTek/1S2
or the
SoNNeT TSATA PCI SATA Controller Card
for about the same price

You will probably need to downgrade the firmware tho, The latest firmware causes sleep problems with G4s.

aibo
Nov 9, 2009, 11:52 AM
The Quicksilver has big drive support. "Digital Audio" was the last G4 with the limitation.

TXbug
Nov 9, 2009, 12:04 PM
I have an older Sawtooth with a 250GB hard drive. It is running Ubuntu now and I found no hard drive restraints because of hardware. If there is a limit on the size of the hard drive, it will be OS related. But I doubt it.

I don't see any reason why a second drive, IDE controlled or USB, cannot be added.

I ran out of space on a mini so I added a USB drive. Copied the photo and iTunes data to the USB drive, deleted it from the original hard drive, and created a link to it ( copied data ) from the original hard drive. I just had to remember to turn on the USB drive before accessing iTunes and iPhoto.

edesignuk
Nov 10, 2009, 03:28 AM
you will need a pci card to use larger drives.I appreciate your reply, but given my source, and the other responses to this thread stating this isn't the case, do you have anything to back up your reply? Not trying to get funny with you, just want to be sure. Thanks.

gnasher729
Nov 10, 2009, 03:42 AM
My dad has my old Power Mac G4 'Quicksilver' from 2002 (dual 1GHz). He's run out of room on the 120GB drives currently installed and I need to find the best way to give him more space.

I was aware of the 128GB limit of the older Power Mac's (and this is why I went 2 x 120GB a couple of years back).

I've got a 2001 733 MHz Quicksilver, and when I checked it, that was the last model with the 128 GB limit (which would be a 137 GB limit nowadays). The 2002 ones should be fine with larger drives.

And you could always go for an external FireWire drive.

cluthz
Nov 10, 2009, 03:56 AM
I have an older Sawtooth with a 250GB hard drive. It is running Ubuntu now and I found no hard drive restraints because of hardware. If there is a limit on the size of the hard drive, it will be OS related. But I doubt it.

I don't see any reason why a second drive, IDE controlled or USB, cannot be added.

I ran out of space on a mini so I added a USB drive. Copied the photo and iTunes data to the USB drive, deleted it from the original hard drive, and created a link to it ( copied data ) from the original hard drive. I just had to remember to turn on the USB drive before accessing iTunes and iPhoto.

You have a 250GB internal ATA or a external drive?
My old Sawtooth have a 160GB HD that shows up as 128GB.
(It also have a 80GB and a 120GB, that are ofc working normally).

It have no troubles using larger Firewire drives tho.

Carolus Rex
Nov 26, 2009, 02:31 PM
..with no troubles, seeing and using the full drive.
Although there is a limitation of 128GB on this computer, there are 3 party extensions that allow for larger drives that you can find by doing a search. Cannot remember the name right now but you will find it +instructions if you search.
Also with a proper ATA controller card I believe that you could install bigger drives without using the mentioned extension.

If you use it on FireWire or USB, there should be no problem at all no matter the size. It is if you use it internally that you would need to use a controller card or add software support for 128+GB. This applies to DA and earlier.

But with YOUR computer, you need not to care about this as it does support bigger drives. It is a later model than the DA and support is built in already in the HW.

4JNA
Nov 26, 2009, 07:16 PM
So, does anyone know if drives larger than 128GB will work in a 2002 Quicksilver (without need need for additional controllers)? Has anyone done it?

yes, i've done it and your quote about the new controller was correct. the 2001 quicksilver had the 128gb limit, and the 2002 quicksilver had the newer controller without the 128gb limit. i have owned both.

that said, if your dad is going to keep and use the machine awhile, going with a pci SATA controller and a large/fast disk would be a nice upgrade and a good use of money. i've done that with both of mine (2001/2002) and it makes a HUGE difference in the speed of the system. the cost of a large IDE is usually more than the same size SATA drive, so the additional cost of the card is the only additional money for the upgrade. either way, best of luck.

macgeek18
Nov 27, 2009, 12:41 AM
so my Power Mac G4 Quicksilver 2001 has no 128GB hard drive limit??good to know,running out of room on the 2 120GB's in it.I'll put a 250GB in and see.

SmurfBoxMasta
Nov 27, 2009, 10:03 AM
Well, just in case anyone is still wondering, MY 867 QS has never had any issues whatsoever with a 200GB drive that is connected to the internal controller & used as a back-up/maintenance/storage drive.

For the sheer speeeed however, I do use a SIIG pci SATA controller w/ 2x 160GB Raptors in a raid as my main drives.....it IS way faster and also neveranottaproblemo in over 4 years ! :)

edesignuk
Nov 27, 2009, 10:11 AM
Thanks for the extra confirmation :) My dad ordered a 500GB IDE drive, glad to hear it should work.

tsugaru
Nov 27, 2009, 10:54 AM
It does work.

I'm using a G4 867 Quicksilver 2002 until my iMac i7 comes in.

I took the old 40GB Seagate out and swapped it with a 320GB Seagate IDE drive I had lying around.

PowerMac3,5
867MHz G4

Cox Orange
Nov 12, 2010, 09:25 AM
I know this thread is old, but maybe this additional info will help someone searching for it later, so I would like to share a link with you:

http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2544?viewlocale=en_US

I am German and I do not know whether I have understood everything under this link, but as far as I got it, it says:

There are to ways:

1. you have a mac that allready supports drives larger than 128GB (or 137GB respectively), which is Macs from until June 2002. (Beware there are some Quicksilver Models that do support it and some don't, due to Apple using other parts in one model it seems.)

2. If not:
a) install an OS X, higher than 10.2 and you can utilize a bigger harddrive
b) For OS 9 Users, they should use OS 9.2.2 and make partitions of not more than 200GB each. (Example, if you have a 320GB HDD make one with 200GB and one with 120GB)

(if you have lets say OS 9.2.1 installed and use a 160GB HDD it will use the drive, but somewhen it will write out of the 128GB space and the drive will get problems. (concerning the last point I got an answer from hitachi, they confirmed that the computer will somewhen start writing in places over the 128GB and will get problems including not booting, corrupted data). You will not notice that in the beginning of use.

Deville
Nov 12, 2010, 12:33 PM
you will need a pci card to use larger drives.

I would recommend getting a SATA card to take advantage of sata speeds and drive availability.

You can get the

FirmTek SeriTek/1S2
or the
SoNNeT TSATA PCI SATA Controller Card
for about the same price

You will probably need to downgrade the firmware tho, The latest firmware causes sleep problems with G4s.

I'm confused, I have the identical mac as the original posters dad so I need to know this as well. What is all this about a controller card? Why cant I just buy a HD and slap it in? Where does the controller card go, in one of the slots?
Thanks

Deville
Nov 12, 2010, 12:59 PM
the 2002 quicksilver had the newer controller without the 128gb limit.

that said, if your dad is going to keep and use the machine awhile, going with a pci SATA controller and a large/fast disk would be a nice upgrade and a good use of money.

Now I'm more confused, first you said the 2002 QS has no 128gb limit, but then say we still need a pci SATA controller? If there is no limit, why do we need the SATA controller? Sorry if I seem dumb on the subject, I just don't get what the controller is for.

Thanks

4JNA
Nov 12, 2010, 01:12 PM
Now I'm more confused, first you said the 2002 QS has no 128gb limit, but then say we still need a pci SATA controller? If there is no limit, why do we need the SATA controller? Sorry if I seem dumb on the subject, I just don't get what the controller is for.

Thanks

no problem. i didn't say you 'need' the SATA pci controller, it was only a recommendation based on personal experience. the difference in using the system with the faster drive/controller is dramatic and very noticeable.

the controller is for using a newer/faster/bigger/cheaper SATA drive with the system, as the Quicksilver (2001/2002) only came with the older IDE connections on the logic board.

the older IDE drives are more expensive when it comes to large capacity, only go up to 750gb that i'm aware of (or have used myself) and transfer data at a much slower speed (133).

the newer SATA drives are less expensive, are available off the shelf up to 2tb (2000gb) at the moment, and transfer data at a much higher speed (300).

best of luck.

Deville
Nov 12, 2010, 01:17 PM
no problem. i didn't say you 'need' the SATA pci controller, it was only a recommendation based on personal experience. the difference in using the system with the faster drive/controller is dramatic and very noticeable.

the controller is for using a newer/faster/bigger/cheaper SATA drive with the system, as the Quicksilver (2001/2002) only came with the older IDE connections on the logic board.

the older IDE drives are more expensive when it comes to large capacity, only go up to 750gb that i'm aware of (or have used myself) and transfer data at a much slower speed (133).

the newer SATA drives are less expensive, are available off the shelf up to 2tb (2000gb) at the moment, and transfer data at a much higher speed (300).

best of luck.

Oh, ok I get it now it's just so I can use a SATA drive rather then IDE. Perfect thanks for your help! This is gonna be sweet my new GE ti4600 video card is on the way and I think I'm going to go pick up a new SATA drive and controller today, I love this old mac :)

Deville
Nov 12, 2010, 01:47 PM
Maybe I jumped the gun getting excited about a new SATA drive, I called the only 2 places in town that could help me and neither could get me a pci controller.

Would someone please show me a link on ebay, or anywhere of the SATA pci controller I need? I dont even know what to look for. I found this one, but will it work?

http://cgi.ebay.ca/2-SATA-II-Controller-PCI-E-2-eSATA-Card-Mac-Pro-OSX-/370453414882?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item5640be83e2#ht_2229wt_877

Also what are the plugs on the front for?

Thanks.

4JNA
Nov 12, 2010, 01:47 PM
...Whats the proper way to say SATA? just say it or say the initials? Just so I dont seem like a douche asking for what I need. Thanks

'say-ta' (just like it looks) is what i hear the most.

new video card plus faster drives... nice! :) best of luck.

Deville
Nov 12, 2010, 01:58 PM
How bout this one, is it good? Also, can I boot up off a Sata drive running through pci, as I want to ditch my IDE completely.

Thanks

http://store1.sonnettech.com/product_info.php?products_id=105

4JNA
Nov 12, 2010, 02:04 PM
Maybe I jumped the gun getting excited about a new SATA drive, I called the only 2 places in town that could help me and neither could get me a pci controller.

Would someone please show me a link on ebay, or anywhere of the SATA pci controller I need? I dont even know what to look for. I found this one, but will it work?

http://cgi.ebay.ca/2-SATA-II-Controller-PCI-E-2-eSATA-Card-Mac-Pro-OSX-/370453414882?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item5640be83e2#ht_2229wt_877

Also what are the plugs on the front for?

Thanks.

going by the .ca in the link, you must be in Canada eh?

two problems with the card you linked... you can only use PCI in a QS, and not PCI-X or PCI-E. different connections, won't work. also, the card you linked was an 'eSATA' or external connection card. you need an 'internal' connector card if you want the drives to be inside the case.

THIS (http://cgi.ebay.ca/SATA-II-PCI-Card-2-Int-2-eSATA-Mac-G3-G4-G5-OSX-/220694453960?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item33626a1ec8) type of card is just for reference what you are looking for. not me, no connection to the auction, no recommendation to buy this card.

dealing with a reputable dealer like OWC (http://eshop.macsales.com/) who ships to CA might be a better deal even though it might cost more. or, maybe see if a local shop can find something similar now you know what to look for. best of luck.

EDIT: yeah, the sonnet card you just picked would work great, and the spec page says 'boots from any attached drive' so you should be good to go.

just for reference, if you look, that card is a SATA I (one) which can transfer at speeds of 150. the newer SATA II (two) cards are the ones that transfer at speed of 300. you can use a new SATA 300 disk with the older SATA 150 card, it just won't transfer data as fast, everything else works just the same.

Deville
Nov 12, 2010, 02:09 PM
going by the .ca in the link, you must be in Canada eh?

two problems with the card you linked... you can only use PCI in a QS, and not PCI-X or PCI-E. different connections, won't work. also, the card you linked was an 'eSATA' or external connection card. you need an 'internal' connector card if you want the drives to be inside the case.

THIS (http://cgi.ebay.ca/SATA-II-PCI-Card-2-Int-2-eSATA-Mac-G3-G4-G5-OSX-/220694453960?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item33626a1ec8) type of card is just for reference what you are looking for. not me, no connection to the auction, no recommendation to buy this card.

dealing with a reputable dealer like OWC (http://eshop.macsales.com/) who ships to CA might be a better deal even though it might cost more. or, maybe see if a local shop can find something similar now you know what to look for. best of luck.

EDIT: yeah, the sonnet card you just picked would work great, and the spec page says 'boots from any attached drive' so you should be good to go.

Yes in Canada eh, I'm going to order one right now eh, I'm sure I could find a used one cheaper but I prefer new. Thanks again for all your help.

Cheers!

Deville
Nov 12, 2010, 02:49 PM
I just noticed what you said about SATA 1 vs SATA 2 and the one I ordered is SATA 1.

I wish I seen that sooner cause I would have rather had a SATA 2 but the only one that site had that I seen was $200, and I wouldn't have paid that anyway, I would rather upgrade to a newer computer. Do you think I'll still notice a speed difference with the SATA 1 compared to my original IDE?

4JNA
Nov 12, 2010, 03:00 PM
I just noticed what you said about SATA 1 vs SATA 2 and the one I ordered is SATA 1.

I wish I seen that sooner cause I would have rather had a SATA 2 but the only one that site had that I seen was $200, and I wouldn't have paid that anyway, I would rather upgrade to a newer computer. Do you think I'll still notice a speed difference with the SATA 1 compared to my original IDE?


yeah, big difference between the original onboard and a new card/drive. faster boot, apps open really quick, good stuff.

for what it's worth, i don't think i've ever used a straight PCI (not -x, -e) card that was SATA II. i know the one from hong kong i linked said SATA 300, but who knows if it is or works or whatever. i've used several sonnet cards like the one you linked, and several 'acard' versions that look just the same and they have all worked really well. fast is good! best of luck.

Deville
Nov 12, 2010, 03:22 PM
Right on I feel good about the purchase, thanks.

Ok one more question, I'm starting to feel like I'm bothering you now. When I get it all installed, because I'm planning to use my new SATA drive alone, do I just take out the old drive and boot holding down C button and install osx on the new drive? Will it be recognized?

Or do I have to keep the old IDE in, format the new drive as journaled, install on the new drive while running my existing os, set boot sequence to new drive then take out IDE?

Or maybe neither way will work?

Thanks again, I think thats all I need to know for now :)

4JNA
Nov 12, 2010, 03:47 PM
Right on I feel good about the purchase, thanks.

Ok one more question, I'm starting to feel like I'm bothering you now. When I get it all installed, because I'm planning to use my new SATA drive alone, do I just take out the old drive and boot holding down C button and install osx on the new drive? Will it be recognized?

Or do I have to keep the old IDE in, format the new drive as journaled, install on the new drive while running my existing os, set boot sequence to new drive then take out IDE?

Or maybe neither way will work?

Thanks again, I think thats all I need to know for now :)


getting me to talk about computers is the easy part... getting me to shut up is much harder! happy to help, plus i'm an ex VON 2PO'er...

either way (old one in, or out and boot from 'c') would work. the sonnet card and the drive attached show up just like the internal (original) drive.

i'd pull the old drive, install the card and new drive, and then use the boot from 'c' option to load the new system myself.

the only other idea i can throw out is that if you are happy with the system/software you have on the old drive right now (running good, no problems, etc) then you could power down, install the card and new drive and 'clone' (make an exact copy) onto the new drive. power down one more time to remove the old drive, and then off you go except faster!

for clone software, i like superduper, but i know lots of people like carbon copy cloner as well. either should do the trick.

Deville
Nov 12, 2010, 05:45 PM
getting me to talk about computers is the easy part... getting me to shut up is much harder! happy to help, plus i'm an ex VON 2PO'er...

either way (old one in, or out and boot from 'c') would work. the sonnet card and the drive attached show up just like the internal (original) drive.

i'd pull the old drive, install the card and new drive, and then use the boot from 'c' option to load the new system myself.

the only other idea i can throw out is that if you are happy with the system/software you have on the old drive right now (running good, no problems, etc) then you could power down, install the card and new drive and 'clone' (make an exact copy) onto the new drive. power down one more time to remove the old drive, and then off you go except faster!

for clone software, i like superduper, but i know lots of people like carbon copy cloner as well. either should do the trick.

Cool, if your going to live up here BC is the place to do it. Thanks, again. Maybe I'll leave the old one in and use it with time machine for my photos and music, only about 60gb worth. or maybe I'll buy 2 500gb SATA one for running the mac and the other for time machine and then I can time machine the entire system.

Although I am really tempted to just go buy a new imac, was looking at them today while looking at HD's, almost bought one but $1800 is a little steep this close to xmas lol. And really, for what I do, music, photos, videos, email and internet this G4 is all I really need for now.

Also, now that openoffice.org finally has ppc support there is nothing I cant do on here that I need to.

Deville
Nov 16, 2010, 10:03 PM
Ok, my pci controller will be here tomorrow. I already mounted my 2 500gb SATA drives so now it's just a matter of plugging them in when the card comes. I decided to leave in the old IDE drive in, didn't see much point in pulling it since there was lots of room for the 2 new drives and this way I have another boot drive if I ever need it.

My questions are,
1 - Is it going to work, or will it mess things up running the old IDE with two new SATA drives. ( keeping in mind the old IDE is strictly for an emergency boot if I ever need to. )

2 - Would I have to set the old IDE to slave, or could I leave it as a master?

3 - I dont think I have ever owned a SATA drive so this may seem like a simple question for anyone with a computer newer then 2004, but how do I set the jumper on the SATA drives, or do I even need to? They have pins but no little jumper thingy like my IDE drive does. I want to use one 500gb for the main system operations and the other 500gb for a time machine backup.

Thanks!

wjlafrance
Nov 16, 2010, 10:46 PM
yeah, big difference between the original onboard and a new card/drive. faster boot, apps open really quick, good stuff.

for what it's worth, i don't think i've ever used a straight PCI (not -x, -e) card that was SATA II. i know the one from hong kong i linked said SATA 300, but who knows if it is or works or whatever. i've used several sonnet cards like the one you linked, and several 'acard' versions that look just the same and they have all worked really well. fast is good! best of luck.

In the real world a hard drive won't soak a SATA 150 bus, so it doesn't matter that much. If you're going with SSDs then you're at much higher risk of soaking the bus and really want SATA 300.

(Soaking the bus refers to the bus being fully saturated with data and becoming the bottleneck. The bottleneck will most likely be the mechanical shortcomings of the drive.)

Deville
Nov 18, 2010, 07:12 PM
Got the card in and hooked up to 2 500gb SATA drives, it's running smooth, pretty noticeable difference. I had to use Carbon copy though because the osx installer would not recognize the drive. Thanks again for all the help.

Deville
Nov 20, 2010, 09:08 PM
Ok, now there is a problem. When ever the computer goes to sleep and I wake it up it freezes. The only solution I found is to do a hard restart, anyone know what to do?

I realize I could set it to never sleep, but I don't really want that. I also read about rolling back the firmware, but I'm not sure. Any ideas?

Cox Orange
Feb 23, 2011, 11:59 AM
There is another way to overcome the 128GB limit, other than software-hacking or installing PCI-cards! Apple reports

I know this thread is old, but maybe this additional info will help someone searching for it later, so I would like to share a link with you:

http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2544?viewlocale=en_US

I am German and I do not know whether I have understood everything under this link, but as far as I got it, it says:

There are to ways:

1. you have a mac that already supports drives larger than 128GB (or 137GB respectively), which is Macs from until June 2002. (Beware there are some Quicksilver Models that do support it and some don't, due to Apple using other parts in one model it seems.)

2. If not:
a) install an OS X, higher than 10.2 and you can utilize a bigger harddrive
b) For OS 9 Users, they should use OS 9.2.2 and make partitions of not more than 200GB each. (Example, if you have a 320GB HDD make one with 200GB and one with 120GB)

(if you have lets say OS 9.2.1 installed and use a 160GB HDD it will use the drive, but somewhen it will write out of the 128GB space and the drive will get problems. (concerning the last point I got an answer from hitachi, they confirmed that the computer will somewhen start writing in places over the 128GB and will get problems including not booting, corrupted data). You will not notice that in the beginning of use.

PS: I am cross-posting, 'cause this is still not familiar to most people and it saves one from buying expensive PCI-cards or messing up your computer by hacking or buying several 120GB drives, which are priced high on EBay, because many people do not know this and there are Win-people who have the LBA45 problem, still.

zen.state
Feb 23, 2011, 01:08 PM
Let me make it clear as there are many ill informed posts in this thread.

The first Quicksilver which came in 2001 and every Mac tower ever made before it DO NOT support drives larger than 128MB in the onboard ATA chipset.

The next two Quicksilver models (2002 and 2002ED) and every Mac tower made after them DO support larger than 128MB drives.

To find out exactly which one you have just look in the system profiler.

Cox Orange
Feb 24, 2011, 08:16 AM
... ill informed posts...

Did you read this? http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2544?viewlocale=en_US

I am not a native speaker, so I maybe get it totally wrong what apple says. Please read it and then explain to me, what apple is actually saying.

Thanks!

BrianBaughn
Feb 24, 2011, 08:28 AM
I've been using this:

http://www.speedtools.com/ATA6.html

in a 1999 Sawtooth for years now. Works great.

zen.state
Feb 24, 2011, 08:41 AM
Did you read this? http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2544?viewlocale=en_US

I am not a native speaker, so I maybe get it totally wrong what apple says. Please read it and then explain to me, what apple is actually saying.

Thanks!

That Apple info page notes that you need 10.2+ to use drives bigger than 128GB. It doesn't remove the 128MB limitation from the first Quicksilver back. It clearly states you need 10.2 plus a Mac that supports larger drives.

The problem is a hardware limitation. Period. You can use software or open firmware hacks to allow the mounting of large non-boot drives but the boot disk itself is still limited to 128GB. This is certainly not the greatest situation to put your data in though. These haxies for no-boot drives can easily cause data corruption.

If people need lots of storage in a pre 2002 Quicksilver Mac then I strongly recommend you just nip it in the bud and buy a SATA PCI card. The cheap price of all the large and fast drives now is worth it alone.

Even a Mac that supports large IDE drives should upgrade to SATA. The only IDE drives I see anymore are 80 or 160GB and cost up to $60 because of the small market. You can buy 1TB SATA drives that would also be much faster for as low as $55 or 60.

666sheep
Feb 24, 2011, 09:00 AM
You can use software or open firmware hacks to allow the mounting of large non-boot drives but the boot disk itself is still limited to 128GB.

OF hack works for boot drives too. At least in Cube. I used 160GB HDD in my Cube without troubles and data loss. But, TBH, never filled this drive above 128GB.

zen.state
Feb 24, 2011, 09:21 AM
OF hack works for boot drives too. At least in Cube. I used 160GB HDD in my Cube without troubles and data loss. But, TBH, never filled this drive above 128GB.

Looks like Brian above also uses bigger drives on his Sawtooth. Is the bootable drive option a new thing? Last I looked into this type of hack (maybe 2004) it noted in a few places that it would only work for non-boot. I have never been much of a sw hack type guy. I will do hardware hacks all day long but prefer to leave every character of code on my system as pure as possible. I guess OF is a hardware hack though..

SATA is still a better option if you want anything above a couple hundred GB. Much cheaper per GB.

Cox Orange
Feb 24, 2011, 09:31 AM
ok, thank you! I will try to get a big drive though, just to be really sure if my iMac G3 can see it under Tiger or not :-) (not saying you are wrong! I am just saying I want to be really really sure, that it does not work).

By the way I won't use these hacks, because I am to anxious I'd harm my system. :)

On your post, that there are only 80 and 160GB IDE Drives... WD has them on their official site with up to 500GB (3,5 caviar blue, with 7200rpm though blue!). (The biggest IDE drive ever produced was a Seagate with 750GB, it is on EBay sometimes for 50-100eur. I would not buy Seagates personally, by the way, just out of personal lack of trust in Seagate products, this is only my opinion, others may have had more luck).
The biggest 2,5" IDE drive by the way is a WD 320GB (WD3200BEVE), the second biggest is a Samsung 160GB.

BrianBaughn
Feb 24, 2011, 09:39 AM
With the Intech Hi-Cap driver you can boot from larger drives, but you need to partition them with the bootable partition 1st and no bigger than 128GB. But, I think it's best to leave the system on a 128GB or smaller drive.

zen.state
Feb 24, 2011, 09:50 AM
Orange:

For a system like an iMac or any other Mac with no PCI or expandability then this haxie is your only option to have larger drives. Some users here are happy with how it works so try it.

Re: Drive sizes. I know they still make 500GB IDE but all I ever see in computer stores IDE-wise anymore is 80-160. Boxed or OEM. There just simply isn't much of an IDE market anymore outside of optical drives.

BrianBaughn
Feb 24, 2011, 10:28 AM
Looks like Newegg has 500GB models.

Cox Orange
Feb 24, 2011, 06:05 PM
Orange:

(...)
Re: Drive sizes. I know they still make 500GB IDE but all I ever see in computer stores IDE-wise anymore is 80-160. Boxed or OEM. There just simply isn't much of an IDE market anymore outside of optical drives.

I agree about the low market demands. But the rest seems to be different over here. In real stores (physical ones) they don't have them here, too, but online there are many European shops, that have them and of course there is EBay.de. I myself am actually a bit astonished, why there are so many new or 1 year old 500GB IDE drives on Ebay, even sealed ones. (I assume most sealed ones are from an RMA exchange).

Cox Orange
Jun 7, 2011, 03:45 PM
Orange:

For a system like an iMac or any other Mac with no PCI or expandability then this haxie is your only option to have larger drives. Some users here are happy with how it works so try it.

I come back here, because I got another idea. The info (from at least Hitachi) was not to use a 160GB drive in a 128GB-limit- Mac, because it will somewhen write relevant system data in places where it can't excess them and the Computer will then get problems (data corruption or even not starting).

So what about partitioning 128GB off (in another Mac) and fill the extra space completely with junk, lets say jpeg files. Wouldn't that prevent from writing data, where it can't be read? (I admit that winning +8 GB compared to installing a 120GB drive is not worth it.)

Dave H
Jun 7, 2011, 09:57 PM
The info (from at least Hitachi) was not to use a 160GB drive in a 128GB-limit- Mac, because it will somewhen write relevant system data in places where it can't excess them and the Computer will then get problems (data corruption or even not starting).

If it is formatted in a 128GB limit Mac, it will be OK (it will only format and use what it can "see").
The problem is if it's formatted in a non-limited Mac, then installed in the limited one.