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iBook
Jul 28, 2004, 04:58 PM
Hi,

Could you buy one of these ($200) and pull out the 4 GB Hitachi drive and use it as an inexpensive microdrive for the Nikon D70?

http://www.creative.com/products/product.asp?prodid=9743

A poster on amazon.com suggested the idea, but I would appreciate some input from someone in the know.

Thanks!

Colonel Panik
Jul 28, 2004, 06:16 PM
Hi,

Could you buy one of these ($200) and pull out the 4 GB Hitachi drive and use it as an inexpensive microdrive for the Nikon D70?

http://www.creative.com/products/product.asp?prodid=9743

A poster on amazon.com suggested the idea, but I would appreciate some input from someone in the know.

Thanks!

I don't know, but you have to consider the speed of the drive as well as the capacity.

I got the Crucial branded 1GB CompactFlash card. Unless you're shooting NEF+JPEG you can shoot 20+ shots in continuous mode before it starts to stutter. I'm planning to get an ultra fast 128/256MB card for high-speed bursts. As for capacity, I'd feel strange carrying 4GB of shots with me. Do you think you'll need that capacity?

belair
Jul 28, 2004, 06:52 PM
I own a D-70 myself and I use it a lot.
I don't know about those microdrives I still hear that they are a lot of trouble to work with. I also heard the rumors of stripping small Hd devices just to get to the card.
All I know is that if you can go with a Flash card memory do so. Buy a couple of 1 Gig cards and shoot away. Unless you do sports coverage and do al ot of braketing you wont need the 4 gig drive. If you shot about 3.8 gigs of photos and you tilt your camera, your pictures are gone. Flashcards and an extra external drive you carry around to do back up while on the job seems the most reliable to me.
What will you be needing your card for?

raynegus
Jul 28, 2004, 07:40 PM
Why do you need 4GB? A compact flash card is more reliable which, in my opinion, is more important. But get a good one, not a slow cheapo.

You can get a 1 GB Sandisk Ultra II CompactFlash Card from B&H for about $220. This is as good as it gets in that price range.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/

MacManDan
Jul 28, 2004, 08:52 PM
Hi,

Could you buy one of these ($200) and pull out the 4 GB Hitachi drive and use it as an inexpensive microdrive for the Nikon D70?


It's possible, but the newer ones (models made since May 2004) have a revised Hitachi drive that prevent them from being used in anything but the Muvo. Take a look here:

http://www.pcconsultant.com/microdrive.htm

Good luck

Edit: To answer your original question, the D70 is compatible with Microdrives. if the hard drive you pull out of the Muvo2 isn't disabled (pre-May model) you should be in business...

bousozoku
Jul 28, 2004, 08:59 PM
My thought has always been to buy an iPod and the Belkin MediaReader attachment to offload the photos.

While the MicroDrive cards would work fine in a studio setting, they're not a good idea where they'll be jostled a lot. Besides, you're going to deplete the battery more quickly.

MacManDan
Jul 28, 2004, 09:06 PM
My thought has always been to buy an iPod and the Belkin MediaReader attachment to offload the photos.

While the MicroDrive cards would work fine in a studio setting, they're not a good idea where they'll be jostled a lot. Besides, you're going to deplete the battery more quickly.

I currently do this .. but it's painfully slow. It takes about 5-7 minutes to transfer a paltry 128megs of photos from my Memory stick. It's good if you have the time to wait, but I haven't been particularly thrilled with the cost/performance ratio :cool:
I can find out exactly how long it takes to transfer the photos from the 128meg stick, and I wouldn't expect the speed to be much different for other cards.

Your points about the microdrive are good though - they're slower than compact flash, the hard drive runs a risk of failing (and losing photos!), but they do offer lots of space.

Edit:
It took 6 mins, 52 seconds to transfer 127.6 megabytes, 61 photos. So that's ..
309.7 kb/s
.15 photos/sec (in my case -

iBook
Jul 28, 2004, 10:07 PM
Thanks all for the posts. The suggestion I'd stumbled across to use an mp3 player microdrive seemed like a good one, but I wanted to sound it out with some of you kind people before making a purchase.

I think you're right about the durability of the flash memory. 4 gigs for $200, though, is just so tempting....

MacManDan
Jul 28, 2004, 10:15 PM
I think you're right about the durability of the flash memory. 4 gigs for $200, though, is just so tempting....

I went through the same thing. In fact, I'm still deciding. I think it's important to figure out what's more important to you. For example, you can get a Sandisk Ultra II 1gig (reallllly fast) for $200, the same price as the less-reliable, not-as-quick, power-hungry 4gb card. So I figure that these are the options:

If you want speed & reliability (ie, sports shots, fast buffer unloads, or decent RAW write speeds) you might want the Sandisk Ultra.
If you go for a long time away from your computer (or are a compulsive shutter pusher), find yourself running out of space often, and you baby your electronics, then the microdrive might be the better choice.

That's how I think of it, at least :-)

Take a look at this link: http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/multi_page.asp?cid=6007-6816
to see how fast various compact flash cards are with your camera. It seems the Ultra II has a massive speed advantage over the micro drive!

pdpfilms
Aug 8, 2004, 10:39 AM
Has anybody here ACTUALLY had a problem of losing data from a microdrive? And does anybody have raw data to back up the idea that the microdrive is "powerhungry"? I'm going on a trip for 3 months where i'll have no chance to get new cards or offload to a computer. I need very high capacity, and the microdrive was looking like the best bet. Any bad experiences?
-klon

Chip NoVaMac
Aug 8, 2004, 12:02 PM
It is a HDD, so more prone to shock and such that makes the things unreadable.

Think of this way. Would you want to take a trip with a film camera that could use a 500 to 1000 shot roll of film? What if you accidently opened the back of the camera? What if you dropped the camera, breaking the light seal?

I know that it is not a perfect solution for everyone, but my digital photography is one of the reasons that I bought the PB 12"(and looked at the Sony TR series). It allows me double back-ups. On the HDD, and the DVD-R's. It also allows me to review my shots to see where I might want to go back and try to re-shoot something. And even saved my bacon once, when a memory card decided to go south.

pdpfilms
Aug 8, 2004, 12:16 PM
I'd love to have the option to bring my PB for backup, but I don't. Backpacking and seakayaking don't take kindly to laptops, I assume. I just want to know what the chances of data loss are. I carry my laptop around with me almost everywhere, and have never had an issue. I know that if you bump it hard enough while it's writing, it could scratch the disk, but I think i'll be taking good enough care of my camera so that everytime I take a picture I'm careful enough not to slam it against a rock or something. To put it simply, I presume the camera is at risk of moderate shock when off and packed away, but is safe from shock when out of the bag and shooting. Does that sound particularly dangerous to anyone? I need a way to store 1000+ pictures under the following conditions: all equipment is self-hauled (low weight is necessary), power is not available (no portable HD's), low price would be best... that's about it. If anybody has any ideas, please contribute.
thanks!

Chip NoVaMac
Aug 8, 2004, 01:19 PM
Solid State is always a better choice for harsh environments. I would suggest a waterproof carrier for your memory cards. Also look at one of the "raincoats" for cameras. If size and weight can be overlooked a bit, Pelican makes some great stuff.

As sweet as the D70 is, you may want to look at one of the Canon S series cameras. And get the waterproof case for it.

bousozoku
Aug 8, 2004, 03:20 PM
I went through the same thing. In fact, I'm still deciding. I think it's important to figure out what's more important to you. For example, you can get a Sandisk Ultra II 1gig (reallllly fast) for $200, the same price as the less-reliable, not-as-quick, power-hungry 4gb card. So I figure that these are the options:

If you want speed & reliability (ie, sports shots, fast buffer unloads, or decent RAW write speeds) you might want the Sandisk Ultra.
If you go for a long time away from your computer (or are a compulsive shutter pusher), find yourself running out of space often, and you baby your electronics, then the microdrive might be the better choice.

That's how I think of it, at least :-)

Take a look at this link: http://www.robgalbraith.com/bins/multi_page.asp?cid=6007-6816
to see how fast various compact flash cards are with your camera. It seems the Ultra II has a massive speed advantage over the micro drive!

Yes, the lure of high capacity often is so tempting as to pull us away from reason.

I've used 4x and 16x Compact Flash cards from Lexar and I needed 1 GB in a hurry and bought a SanDisk card but not the Ultra or Ultra II because they didn't have it in that capacity. It looked just like the fast SmartMedia cards I used to buy but it was ever so grindingly slow. Lexar has 40x and 80x cards to put up against the SanDisk Ultra and Ultra II cards. I think the latter two are 50x and 100x cards, so they're a bit faster than Lexar's.

pdpfilms:

I've stayed away from the MicroDrives even though they were a good deal. Of course, now you can't find a 4 GB drive since they're installed in music players. Every review I've read in various magazines and on the digital camera websites posted in other threads here say that MicroDrives are a much bigger power drain and that bumping them, while the camera is on, will upset them.