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zimv20
Jul 29, 2004, 01:59 PM
...and i couldn't be happier about it.

i do a little sys admin stuff on the side. in may, a friend working at a small business (3 PCs) recommended me to the owner. i told her my rate, she approved, and i had a look at the machines (there were a variety of symptoms).

two of the machines were badly infected (no anti-virus installed, everyone using the admin account). i bought two copies of Norton AV, couldn't get them to install, recommended new machines (cheaper than me fixing those two very old ones, plus the install CDs were long gone). i never got the go-ahead to repair or replace them. i did some other things, too, like phone support and some networking.

at the end of may, i submitted my invoice for hours worked and for the Norton copies. guess what -- it got ignored.

cut to today, when i demanded my invoice be paid. very unprofessionally -- in front of customers -- she complained the PCs were "still slow," that the invoice i handed to her (she lost my first one) was $200 higher than the other (it wasn't, it was a photocopy of the original) and all but accused me of stealing some ethernet cables (not only did i not, but i'm stuck w/ two that i bought but never gave to her because they had more than they told me they did).

finally, she teased me w/ how much more work there was to do, then told me i was too expensive. this actually made me happy, 'cuz i was going to cash the check and drop her as a client anyway. all i said was, "okay."

i made a mad dash to her bank to cash the check, fearing she was going to put a stop payment on it. but i got the cash! woo-hoo! who wants sushi?

yellow
Jul 29, 2004, 02:12 PM
who wants sushi?

Me! Toro & Red Snapper, please!

Congrats for getting out of that one carrying a sack with a $ on it!

jefhatfield
Jul 29, 2004, 02:13 PM
...and i couldn't be happier about it.

i do a little sys admin stuff on the side. in may, a friend working at a small business (3 PCs) recommended me to the owner. i told her my rate, she approved, and i had a look at the machines (there were a variety of symptoms).

two of the machines were badly infected (no anti-virus installed, everyone using the admin account). i bought two copies of Norton AV, couldn't get them to install, recommended new machines (cheaper than me fixing those two very old ones, plus the install CDs were long gone). i never got the go-ahead to repair or replace them. i did some other things, too, like phone support and some networking.

at the end of may, i submitted my invoice for hours worked and for the Norton copies. guess what -- it got ignored.

cut to today, when i demanded my invoice be paid. very unprofessionally -- in front of customers -- she complained the PCs were "still slow," that the invoice i handed to her (she lost my first one) was $200 higher than the other (it wasn't, it was a photocopy of the original) and all but accused me of stealing some ethernet cables (not only did i not, but i'm stuck w/ two that i bought but never gave to her because they had more than they told me they did).

finally, she teased me w/ how much more work there was to do, then told me i was too expensive. this actually made me happy, 'cuz i was going to cash the check and drop her as a client anyway. all i said was, "okay."

i made a mad dash to her bank to cash the check, fearing she was going to put a stop payment on it. but i got the cash! woo-hoo! who wants sushi?

being a techie for five years, which is about the longest anyone should do the job and still keep their sanity, i have come across some strange clients

if they are too cheap to buy new machines, but know they should buy some, then they will be too cheap to pay you what you are worth

small business/home clients are often cash strapped and though not a fault of their own, there are plenty of teenage sons and daughters, or the whiz kids across the street who should fix their stuff and will do it for free or very cheap

but for professionals like you and me, the ultra cheap clients like this one you had are not worth wasting our time...it's not that they purposely want to waste our time, it's more that they are not a good fit for a professional techie who should make $25-$75 dollars an hour for a task (or more)

when i fall and scrape my knee, i go to the school nurse and all is fine...now if i fall and scrape my knee and check into the mayo clinic and then complain about the high bill, then i am not playing in my own league

your client was not playing in her own league ;)

zimv20
Jul 29, 2004, 03:24 PM
your client was not playing in her own league ;)
indeed.

things looked promising at first. i normally wouldn't take on such a small client, but it was basically a favor for my friend (who has since quit!). what's more, the boss agreed to my rate (which i lowered because of the friend referrel) and apologized the first day for not being in the office to cut me a check.

"that's okay," i said, "i do invoices at the end of the month."

live and learn, eh?

Doctor Q
Jul 29, 2004, 03:32 PM
I'm still waiting to be paid for some contract work done years ago. It was to write a device driver for a small operating system. I studied it and figured out that it couldn't be done for some technical reason. They decided to ignore my invoice because they didn't "get" anything for the time I spent doing the research. It wasn't a big amount, so I didn't pursue it. But word spreads about people and small companies who do this, and it may come back to haunt them someday.

zimv20
Jul 29, 2004, 03:43 PM
yeah, i'm not even going to bother invoicing her for the time i've worked since. it's not worth the toner :-)

krimson
Jul 29, 2004, 03:48 PM
i did some work for my ex-gf's law office year back, glad it went reasonably well, i too gave her a discounted rate. But that was the last, and i'll never do it again.

and thanks to zim, i have a grumbling craving for some uni. :mad: :D

Foucault
Jul 29, 2004, 06:02 PM
Congratulations, I guess... Tech support can be such a godforsaken job

trebblekicked
Jul 29, 2004, 08:42 PM
...and i couldn't be happier about it...

[Big Gulp®]

...i made a mad dash to her bank to cash the check, fearing she was going to put a stop payment on it. but i got the cash! woo-hoo!

ah, the life of the self employed. well played.


who wants sushi?
what's your sushi place? i'm a nohana guy (belmont/broadway) cheap and awesome.

virividox
Jul 29, 2004, 08:50 PM
i want yellow tail, himachi, and unagi pleaaaase

KingSleaze
Jul 29, 2004, 10:51 PM
Steak please not fish. :)

zimv20
Jul 29, 2004, 11:44 PM
what's your sushi place? i'm a nohana guy (belmont/broadway) cheap and awesome.
agh, the cursed place with the awning!

just kidding. my three places are New Toyko (right across the street from nohana, i think), Sai Cafe (sheffield/armitage) and Tombo (lincoln/melrose).

Mudbug
Jul 29, 2004, 11:56 PM
I'm a California Roll kinda guy - fishy, but not REALLY fishy.
Plenty of soy sauce, and wasabi of course.

zimv20
Jul 30, 2004, 12:18 AM
Congrats for getting out of that one carrying a sack with a $ on it!
btw, that's the funniest thing i've read all day.

Wardofsky
Jul 30, 2004, 01:33 AM
What's more stylish?
Fired or Quitting?

pseudobrit
Jul 30, 2004, 01:39 AM
What's more stylish?
Fired or Quitting?

Fired as a default is more stylish, but you can make quitting way cooler if you're creative.

zimv20
Jul 30, 2004, 02:40 AM
Fired as a default is more stylish, but you can make quitting way cooler if you're creative.
i tend to not burn bridges when i quit, so i've missed out on that fun. but i think this was the first i've been fired since '81, so it was kind of special. still, i was looking forward to my first dropping of a client.

janey
Jul 31, 2004, 12:58 AM
well you said it was a sysadmin job sorta kinda thing...
so happy sysadmin appreciation day ;)

what a coincidence :D

http://sysadminday.com , iirc.

zimv20
Jul 31, 2004, 12:18 PM
well you said it was a sysadmin job sorta kinda thing...
so happy sysadmin appreciation day ;)

thank you!

i didn't even know it existed. i think it should be recognized on a saturday, seems more apropos.

MikeLaRiviere
Jul 31, 2004, 02:35 PM
It sounds to me like you ripped her off. If you didn't actually fix her machines, why should she pay you? It's pretty unprofessional of you to drop her as a client after your first paycheck, so I'm not sure why you're proud of your behavior. Perhaps it's just me, I'm one of those people who finish what they start and get paid based on the end result.

Mike LaRiviere

pseudobrit
Jul 31, 2004, 02:42 PM
It sounds to me like you ripped her off. If you didn't actually fix her machines, why should she pay you? It's pretty unprofessional of you to drop her as a client after your first paycheck, so I'm not sure why you're proud of your behavior. Perhaps it's just me, I'm one of those people who finish what they start and get paid based on the end result.

Go back and read it again.

jared_kipe
Jul 31, 2004, 03:07 PM
I prefer teriyaki or yakisoba.... mmm noodles..

zimv20
Jul 31, 2004, 05:11 PM
If you didn't actually fix her machines, why should she pay you?
because i was working on a time and materials basis. i.e. i get paid for the hours i work.

i was perfectly happy to fix the machines, but it would have taken a long time and i wanted to get permission for that first (that is professional behavior, btw).

she made a habit of not returning my phonecalls. she lost my invoice. she actually moved the business without telling me (imagine my surprise when i stopped by and found an emptied office). i was going to drop her because she was a horrible client and i don't need that kind of stress. part of my payment, btw, was money for a couple copies of Anti-virus which i put on my credit card. the s/w was her in possession, so that's akin to a 3 month loan from me to her.

i mention time and materials. i could have also worked under a contract which would have stipulated a price for a project accomplished. under that scenario, i would have been obligated to get the PCs back to health before getting paid. but that wasn't the contract.

Stelliform
Jul 31, 2004, 06:54 PM
.....

Stelliform
Jul 31, 2004, 06:59 PM
....

zimv20
Jul 31, 2004, 07:48 PM
thanks stell, good info.

when i was called in, it wasn't to fix infected computers. it was "the internet is slow, and every day around 2pm we lose internet connection."

they had no IT person and very high turnover (indeed, 100% since the beginning of May). nothing was written down. they couldn't give me the router passwords (there were two routers, nobody knew which one was handing out IPs) or even tell me for certain who provided their internet service. so my first task was to discover how everything worked. once i figured it out, i documented it, which is more than anyone had done before.

it was only after this i discovered how infected the computers were (so infected they wouldn't allow Norton to be installed). this was the point at which i said, "okay, this is going to be expensive to fix. what do you want me to do?" never getting an answer, i stopped working. so my main accomplishment was to document what they had, to make it easier for the next IT guy.

i suspect they've lost the documentation, so oh well.

thank god my other clients are much better...

jefhatfield
Jul 31, 2004, 08:59 PM
Go back and read it again.

lmao :) .. i think he didn't, or couldn't, read it the first time around

i heard somewhere that 18 million american adults born here don't read

he could very well be one of them...i see stupid comments from time to time here, but in four years here, this one made by him is a classic...it kind of reminds me of that slyflextron fiasco about physics we had some time back in the political forums ;)

cubist
Jul 31, 2004, 09:42 PM
Hey zim, congrats on collecting the money.

Time & materials is the only way to go. Anything else is weasel city.

The old saying is there are two bad things that happen in business. One is when you don't get the job; the other, far worse, is when you do.

beg_ne
Jul 31, 2004, 10:04 PM
Um well by definition since it was running Windows there is no way to "fix" the computers. The guy was definitely in the right to cut her loose and be glad he got atleast some money out of his stupid client.

The job where I work we do tech work for various people fairly often. And fact is most of the people (windows users) are idiots and quite frankly shouldnt have computers. Time and materials is the standard way to charge for tech work. All you can do is do your best and try to fix the machines as best you can and charge for your time. If the client bitches then cut them loose.

I can't think of how much better it would be if they had Mac's but then again do they really deserve to be on a Mac?

It sounds to me like you ripped her off. If you didn't actually fix her machines, why should she pay you? It's pretty unprofessional of you to drop her as a client after your first paycheck, so I'm not sure why you're proud of your behavior. Perhaps it's just me, I'm one of those people who finish what they start and get paid based on the end result.

Mike LaRiviere

zimv20
Jul 31, 2004, 10:48 PM
Um well by definition since it was running Windows there is no way to "fix" the computers.
i don't think that's fair. had she wanted me to, i would have wiped the drives and reinstalled everything from scratch (if the restore CDs ever turned up, that is). next, i would have installed Anti-virus and run all the updates (NAV, OS and Office). then, i would have made non-administrator user accounts for daily use. finally, i would have come up w/ some kind of backup scheme for their database.

they'd still be slow win95 machines, but at least they'd function.

kerb
Jul 31, 2004, 10:55 PM
nigiri, shashimi, unagari and california rolls


mmmmhmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm :D

MikeLaRiviere
Jul 31, 2004, 11:18 PM
Thanks for explaining it. A friend of mine also does computer repair work in the same vein, and come to think of it, he too charges on an hourly basis.

Mike LaRiviere

zimv20
Jul 31, 2004, 11:37 PM
Thanks for explaining it.
no problem. there's no doubt i'd rather fix something for a client than not fix it, but i don't work for free.

kaylie_kipe
Aug 1, 2004, 11:58 AM
I have been fired before too, but it was from K-Mart. If you ever go to a small town in Colorado and you're thinking about applying for a job at K-Mart...DON'T do it! If they decide they don't want you working there anymore they say your drawer came up so and so short and it was in cash and there's no explanation for it so they need to fire you. And if you ask if they looked at the cameras they'll tell you no and that they aren't going to either. Stupid small town K-mart!

jaromski
Aug 1, 2004, 01:51 PM
Since then I have been much more picky about who I work for. If they are over 30 days I stop doing their work. I always explain this up front. I have too much work to give up paying clients for non paying ones. If you tell this to them up front most people will take care of you.

Dude, you are right on here. I run my own home design business, and when I first started I did it part-time here and there for a couple home builders. But it slowly built up through word-of-mouth referrals to the point now where I have more work than I can do. I could work 365/24/7 and still have work to do. The problem I am facing now is that I have a handful of really demanding clients that don't pay their bills. "I lost the invoice, could you fax it over to me again?" or "God, that invoice is sure high. I can't make my margins if your invoices are so high...yada yada" I am a pretty laid-back type, pretty chill most of the time, I like to work hard and I feel I should be compensated adequately for it. But I am getting cranky and worn-out working with these types. I mean you can be cheap or demanding, but not both. I have one client who I am going to drop, I can feel it. He always wants me to throw in an extra 20 hours of work for free then to add insult to injury he won't pay me within 30 days. So if I am not adding any value to his bottom line (which he is telling me in a roundabout manner) then I don't need him. It is difficult though, part of me is really nervous about cutting him off, what if business slows down? etc etc. But I guess it is just growing pains and something I would come across sooner or later.

But I have been getting a sizeable non-refundable deposit up front and demanding COD payment when the work is done. I have found as long as you level with customers up front they are pretty reasonable. Most are anyway.

And on a separate note, if you are billing hourly for your work, and the hourly is the bulwark of your revenue center then you need to figure out creative ways to get away from hourly billing. If you can figure out how to price on a per unit basis you will boost your revenues like you wouldn't believe. It decouples your need to provide X hours for Y price. You provide X installs or X upgrades for Y unit price. I don't know, I have done it for my home design biz, and after some initial dissent from customers it has really paid dividends.

I mean if you aren't making $100k/yr self-employed, it just ain't worth the effort. Go find a job working for somebody else. But that is my opinion, and we all know what those are like...

JaromSki

zimv20
Aug 1, 2004, 02:12 PM
It is difficult though, part of me is really nervous about cutting him off, what if business slows down? etc etc.
it's a risk, of course. one way to hedge your bets is to raise your rate w/ that particular client. if he accepts it, you still have to put up w/ his BS, but at least you're getting more.


And on a separate note, if you are billing hourly for your work, and the hourly is the bulwark of your revenue center then you need to figure out creative ways to get away from hourly billing.
your point is well-taken. bidding on a job shifts the risk from the client to the contractor. i'm risk-averse, plus this stuff is only part-time for me and i don't like spending a lot of time on overhead activities.

but such contracts work for a lot of people, since that extra risk also carries the potential of extra reward.

anyone here do bid work?

Doctor Q
Aug 1, 2004, 02:34 PM
one way to hedge your bets is to raise your rate w/ that particular client.That matches the philosophy behind one of my pricing rules: Make sure to price a job high enough so that you'll be happy if you get the job. It seems obvious when you think about it, but people often forget it. If a job involves more "expense" to you (both monetary and in mental anguish), make sure your offers cover that cost. For a million dollars, I'll put up with a pretty nasty customer. For the same price as friendly customers, it's not worth it.

Colonel Panik
Aug 2, 2004, 09:38 AM
Yeah, working for yourself is a double-edged sword. You get to be more productive with your time, but others don't seem to realise that you're not a 9-5er and that you actually care about your work and expect professionalism from them.

I've taken to sending them a contract before I work, and before that, I talk to them about my rates and stuff.

I'd like to see a poll about how many MacRumor readers are self-employed.

By the way, I'll have some avocado maki, and tempora. Vegans don't do too well in sushi restaurants :( , but I love avocado maki.

ejb190
Aug 2, 2004, 12:22 PM
This is great folks! I have been thinking about doing some computer consulting on the side (Mostly FileMaker Pro, maybe presentations and photo work if I get desperate/daring). A couple of things you have said have really made me reconsider how to go about things.

Do any of you part-timers have any problems with your full time employer and conflict of interests?

zimv20
Aug 2, 2004, 01:23 PM
Do any of you part-timers have any problems with your full time employer and conflict of interests?
i'm completely self-employed, so no. i have the absolute luxury of not needing to rely on my IT clients for my staples (it's merely spending money), so all the normal pressures of being self-employed don't apply here.

my priorities are to set my own hours and being able to not take on work i don't want. if my priorities were a steady income and benefits, i'd direct hire somewhere.

jefhatfield
Aug 2, 2004, 08:24 PM
i would say overall hour for hour, being self employed pays more....but when working for someone else, the overall take is better since they usually can give you more hours than you can generate yourself

the key for me is the freedom to work m-f and not the weekends (usually) and not deal with bad clients

to be able to work a full week or more, it takes either a) a field where you have no competition or very little competition, or b) advertising and always being on the lookout for leads and aggressively pursuing them...it can get tiring being a "salesman" all the time, but some people cannot help but promote themselves 24/7...those people almost always become millionaires or multi-millionaires

it's not a plan or approach that makes a self employed person rich beyond anybody's dreams, but a certain personality, or even sickness/obsesson which drives a person to work for themselves so they can both charge more and work way beyond what labor laws would allow an "employee" of someone to work

jaromski
Aug 3, 2004, 02:09 PM
i would say overall hour for hour, being self employed pays more....but when working for someone else, the overall take is better since they usually can give you more hours than you can generate yourself

seriously, if you aren't making a 100k/year then it just isn't worth being self-employed. being self-employed can be hell on your schedule and if you have other demands (such as wife, kids, etc.) it puts stress on those relationships too. in the end it boils down to your loyalties. what are you going to be loyal to when you have a finite amount of time to split between your demands?


the key for me is the freedom to work m-f and not the weekends (usually) and not deal with bad clients


the real pickle on this one is that at first your business is in growth mode. growth mode is icky because you have to take on many clients that are bottom-feeders. they are looking to screw you and they know you are hungry so they will leverage that against you. they will dicker down your rates, pay you on their timeframe, hassle you with throwing in extras for the same price, ad nauseum. that is just paying dues; everybody has to do it. unless you acquire venture capital, but that adds a whole slew of additional headaches. it is a trade-off: capitalization for personal share dilution.

then something magical happens. your business switches into income mode. you don't need the bottom-feeders. you can leverage demand for your services against your customer base. just don't leverage too much and the income can really start to flow.

over some amount of time your business transitions into something larger than yourself. you could work non-stop and still have work to do. this is where your business can fracture or really take it up a notch. this is where i am at right now and it is scary but exhilarating at the same time. i can really screw the whole thing up if i don't pay full attention, but i think that self-employed types are addicted to this feeling. the money starts to really come in and some of the customers are even happy. it just rocks.


to be able to work a full week or more, it takes either a) a field where you have no competition or very little competition, or b) advertising and always being on the lookout for leads and aggressively pursuing them...it can get tiring being a "salesman" all the time, but some people cannot help but promote themselves 24/7...those people almost always become millionaires or multi-millionaires

it's not a plan or approach that makes a self employed person rich beyond anybody's dreams, but a certain personality, or even sickness/obsesson which drives a person to work for themselves so they can both charge more and work way beyond what labor laws would allow an "employee" of someone to work

the competition factor plays HUGELY into your business. the more revenue in a particular market, the more competition. the more competition, the more energy/revenue you have to divert to sales/advertising/marketing. this translates into slimmer margins per transaction. but if you can make it up on volume then it usually ends up being a good thing in the end.

i have worked a full-time job and logistically it is much simpler and much less stressful than running your own biz. i mean getting a paycheck every two weeks and not having to hassle customers to collect is a huge plus. also your time and talents are leased out per hour/day/year, you can effectively switch off your brain after you leave the office. you just don't have to worry about all the other details.

the reality is that anybody can be a contractor. you can lease your time out to a boss or N bosses and make a comfortable living. but to build a business, a revenue engine that will exist and grow without you present, that is the dream.

my dream anyway,

jaromSki

zimv20
Aug 3, 2004, 05:10 PM
the reality is that anybody can be a contractor. you can lease your time out to a boss or N bosses and make a comfortable living. but to build a business, a revenue engine that will exist and grow without you present, that is the dream.

my dream anyway,

it's a good dream, keep at it.

i've done the killing-myself-for-my-own-business thing, now i'm just trying to be an IT contractor guy w/ one eensy-weensy tiny (i.e. low effort) business on the side. but they keep pullllllllinnnnng me back in!

Stelliform
Aug 3, 2004, 08:12 PM
.....

jefhatfield
Aug 3, 2004, 08:39 PM
:) Not quite there yet.... Or even close, but I started the company to stay in Lafayette near my parents and my wife's parents. (I had trouble getting a job with my Comp Sci Degree in town.) So money doesn't have to be the only reward for owning your own business.

(To make more money with by the hour work is to either raise your rates, or hire helpers. I am trying both to some degree. :))

for some, making money, even 100k a year or more, is the main goal

for others, it's the freedom of being your own boss and that's where i stand, but equally important is being who i am and true to myself, an entrepreneur...it's a lifestyle but not an obsession

if it were an obsession, i would be fabulously rich, but since it's not, when i go home i am not "on", i am lucky to be able to shut it off and enjoy my life...the obsessed person can't shut it off and makes their family and friends suffer and possibly even shaves off years from their life...i don't see much use in being the youngest, richest person in the cemetery with the inscription, "...and he worked hard, very hard" ;)

jaromski
Aug 4, 2004, 01:10 PM
:) Not quite there yet.... Or even close, but I started the company to stay in Lafayette near my parents and my wife's parents. (I had trouble getting a job with my Comp Sci Degree in town.) So money doesn't have to be the only reward for owning your own business.

(To make more money with by the hour work is to either raise your rates, or hire helpers. I am trying both to some degree. :))

I had the same problem as you, I graduated in Computer Science in 2001. Computer Science was the hot ticket when I started, and more importantly, I was/am very passionate about it. However the job market when I got out of school was dismal to say the least...so I fell back on something I learned in high school...CAD. And the demand for CAD was bigger than I anticipated and now it is a full-time job. I wish I could separate myself from my job more, but it is very hard for me to do. I have a hard time saying NO.

Yeah I wish I could be more pragmatic and not care about making the extra money, but I am young and ambitious so I want to make the max. money with the min. amount of time. I really wish I could stop spending money but I have expensive tastes, I mean we are on a Mac discussion board, and honestly Macs don't come cheap!!!

To my defense, I have stopped working weekends and I only meet customers from 9am-5pm Mon-Fri. Otherwise I am always at work. Another crucial aspect is having a separate place of business than your home. I am currently running my business from home, but I really want to get an office space soon. The problem is I hate renting; if I am gonna get an office, I want to own it. But my business is relatively young (2.5 years old) and it doesn't make sense to buy an office space with my current situation. I need more data and more time.

At any rate, there is a notion of more freedom and control running your own business, but I have noticed I actually have less freedom now than I did working a full-time job for a software company.

And hiring helpers does help alleviate a certain amount of stress, but it also adds another stress...management. Well it depends where you add the helpers I guess, I mean you can add sales/office managers to the front-end leaving you more time for back-end operations, or you can add more to the back-end which turns you into a manager. It really depends on your personality. I find that I prefer the front-end operations for my current business than the back-end, but I still have to do QA if somebody else does the back-end work. It just ends up making the business more complicated; there just aren't any easy answers in running a business.

Well, that wasn't necessarily informative or useful, but there it is.

JaromSki

zimv20
Aug 4, 2004, 02:34 PM
when i had my consulting business (started w/ 3 others), we worked our butts off. i went several years w/o a vacation, working 80-100 hrs/week. it sucked, but the business grew. a lot.

the two hardest things:
1. having partners means not being able to call the shots. i figure we averaged 20 hours/week meeting and arguing.

2. growing pains. it took me a year to convince everyone we needed an assistant. i hired someone (i ran HR) to work 20 hrs/week. she went FT w/in two months and w/in a year, we hired another FT assistant.

that's just one example of growing pains. the hardest thing about it is getting past the idea that you can do everything yourself. though outsourcing stuff (either through a service or by hiring) goes in the books as an expense, it's important to remember that your time is valuable to the business and, by freeing yourself up to concentrate on those things that only you can do, you're growing the business.