PDA

View Full Version : who here lives in a small town?


jefhatfield
Aug 7, 2004, 08:08 PM
is your town under 50,000 people, under 25,000 people, under 10,000 people, under 5,000 people, or smaller?

i live in a northern california region called monterey county which is 130 miles long and about half as wide but only has 300,000 people so it's very sparsely populated

i live in carmel which has 4400 people and the biggest city nearby is seaside which is seven miles away and has the mall everyone goes to and it's just over 30,000 people

King Cobra
Aug 7, 2004, 08:24 PM
I live in a sh**hole caled Sweden (it's the name of a town), in the middle of nowhere, in the state of Maine. It has 300 people, and most of them suck.

There is no high-speed broadband for 50km out, there is no cell phone service, there are no traffic lights, there are no stores anywhere in the town, and the whole area (this town, almost every town over, and the town nearest to that) is filled with rednecks that live behind cigarettes, a stupid accent, pick-up trucks, a serious lack of responsibility, and mentally-corrupting lateness in terms of expectations as to when they'll show up at your house, complete a job for you, or both. It absolutely sucks!! Maine sucks, because it's filled with such people. I hate it here...I want to move back [to New Jersey], because none of the above hardships got in the way. The only people that aren't like that are the ones that live about 100km south and east near the coast and in the larger cities, like Portland, Westbrook, Saco, and maybe Wells, because they are far more responsible and intelligent than some of the people up in Sweden, Maine.

MarksEvilTwin
Aug 7, 2004, 08:27 PM
Removed

FatTony
Aug 7, 2004, 08:36 PM
There are only 11 stoplights in my entire county. And I don't even live in the biggest town in the county. And to top it off, last year's national banjo champ lives in my area! I have a 10 minute drive to cell phone service, 30 minutes to the next town that actually has anything.

windowsblowsass
Aug 7, 2004, 08:36 PM
I live in a borough. wich means it is about 2 miles long by 2 miles wide and there is nothing to do. Its called duboistown and its a borough of southwilliamsport, where the litle league world series (glorified traffic jam) is played.

Mr. Anderson
Aug 7, 2004, 08:56 PM
Just moved to Warsaw, Indiana - population 13,000 -

I have to say its a nice change from all the stress I had in DC :D

D

Nermal
Aug 7, 2004, 09:01 PM
The town I live in has about 20000 people. We have cell phone coverage and DSL, so I'm happy :)

There are only a few apartment buildings here, the tallest building in the town is the hospital, 5 storeys.

Now for the important stuff: We have 2 McDonald's, 1 Burger King, 1 Pizza Hut, 1 KFC and 1 Subway ;)

jefhatfield
Aug 7, 2004, 09:01 PM
Just moved to Warsaw, Indiana - population 13,000 -

I have to say its a nice change from all the stress I had in DC :D

D

actually it's you who inspired me on this thread

on another thread, i noticed you lived in a town i had never heard of prompting me to wonder how many macrumors members live in small or relatively unknown cities...thus this thread :)

Duff-Man
Aug 7, 2004, 09:28 PM
Duff-Man says....I grew up in Toronto - millions of people...when I moved out west to Victoria (less that 300,000 in the "greater" area) it sure felt like a "small town" to me - actually just what the size I wanted - not too big but not too small.....oh yeah!

Roger1
Aug 7, 2004, 09:30 PM
I live in a small town that has NO stoplights. I think we have about 1,000 people in the village, and I think 3000 in the whole township.

bousozoku
Aug 7, 2004, 09:32 PM
Oviedo has around 40,000 people, up from 10,000 or so 10 years ago. It's a suburb of Orlando, so it's a part of an area with around 2,000,000 people. Is that complex enough for you?

I once lived in a town of 7,000 and couldn't blow my nose without someone on the other side of town knowing about it instantly, which was a little close for my perception of reality.

Doctor Q
Aug 7, 2004, 10:59 PM
I live in Los Angeles, but I'll put in a post on behalf of a man I once met. He lived in the tiny town of Lee Vining, California (http://www.leevining.com/), population a few hundred.

Here's the town:

http://www.leevining.com/images/lv.jpg

This man said he had never in his life been further than the town of Bishop, 65 miles south of Lee Vining, whose population was 3,475 in the 1990 census.

EJBasile
Aug 7, 2004, 11:07 PM
My town in CT is under 10,00 people i think. We got our first McDonalds in 1996 lol.

bbarnhart
Aug 7, 2004, 11:13 PM
I live in a rural farming community about 25 miles south of the suburbs of Kansas City. We have DSL from the phone company (tiny town in Missouri 2 miles away). I enjoy having all the space and not having all the noise of suburb life. We have plenty of skunk smell, cow smell, bugs, gravel road dust and wind to spare.

I work up in "town" and it only takes 30 minutes and there is no traffic. We are staring to pick up a lot of friends and acquaintances as our young kids begin school.

When I voted during the primary election last week there were two people sitting at a small table right next to each other. I told her my name, signed the book and then she gave me a slip of paper with my political party. I then had to hand it to the lady sitting right next to her to get my ballot. Election rules say that she can't just hand it to her. They laughed and laughed.

Counterfit
Aug 7, 2004, 11:33 PM
My town is.... weird. It's home to the Farelli brothers, and Rocco Baldelli (sort of...). Heck, part of it was even in Dumb & Dumber. (although they messed up the timing :D). The town is mostly residential, about 30,000 people. Most of them work in a nearby city, like Boston, Providence, Pawtucket (a Hasbro VP lives right up the street from me, next to my aunt), Woonsocket, etc. Open space has been a concern for some time now, but I don't think the current administration is doing anything to help slow down housing development. What really bugs me about that is the way they build them. Every tree in the area is cut and cleared, leaving nothing for shade (thank God they didn't do that in my neighborhood), then they build the houses as little as 35 feet apart. Then people pay $250k+ for them! :eek:

Anyways, there are quite a few restaurants, a grand total of 3 bars, no movie theaters, no clubs (except for the Boys & Girls Club ;)), no malls, no nightlife (save those three bars). Everything is located in a neighboring town/city. Malls, movie theaters, car dealerships, you name it, it's not here but pretty damned nearby.


I hate living in suburbia :(

jefhatfield
Aug 7, 2004, 11:44 PM
This man said he had never in his life been further than the town of Bishop, 65 miles south of Lee Vining, whose population was 3,475 in the 1990 census.


wow, in this day and age that's amazing that he has stayed put that much...how old is he?

i have a friend who has stayed in northern california his whole life (or 99+ percent of it) and only ventured out three times in his 32 years...a two week trip to vancouver, bc, a two week trip to seattle, wa, and a month long trip to southern california (los angeles)...he has never been more than a hundred miles from the pacific ocean!!! in other words, he has hugged the pacific coastline, or relatively near, of just the west coast of the usa and canada and his personal/political/social viewpoints are often just made from the point of view of his city of 29,000, the five or six surrounding cities, and the far off places up and down highway 1 or highway 101...we live close to the central valley and we live close to the sierra nevada and he has seen neither...next time my wife and i go somewhere outside of his sphere, we should take him ;)

to me, he is the most insulated person i have ever met in my life...california is a big state so there are probably a lot of people who have gone 30 years or more and have never left its borders...and there must be someone here from hawaii, samoa, or the virgin islands who has lived decades and never set foot outside of their general area

Kingsnapped
Aug 7, 2004, 11:48 PM
I live in a 'burb about five miles south of Green Bay called De Pere. We have about 20,000 people and plenty of little shops and stuff, but nothing entertaining beyond our bowling alley.

My nightlife here mostly consists of driving around with a friend until about 2 in the morning, looking for people to bother, or driving myself out to Green Bay to see the girlfriend.

numark
Aug 8, 2004, 12:10 AM
The town that I currently live in has about 7,000 people (according to the Census), but for a town with that many people, it sure doesn't have a lot in it to do during the evening/weekend.

I lived a good portion of my childhood in a town of probably 500-1000 people. It's an extremely tiny village, populated mostly by farms. In fact, our house was one of the few non-farm houses in the village. Likewise, nothing to do. My mother can remember, during her high school days, sitting under the bridge with her friends because there was nothing else to do.

virividox
Aug 8, 2004, 12:16 AM
i live in a village thats pure residential about 50 000 people

its a suburb of manila which has 12 million i think

windowsblowsass
Aug 8, 2004, 12:34 AM
ok we have 1,280 people as of 2000

Neserk
Aug 8, 2004, 12:46 AM
I think there are that many people in my apartment complex :D okay, slight exaggeration...

I did note something interesting today: My neighbors to one side are Asian (Korean, I think), upstairs the nieghbors are Hispanic, across the way a lady who is deaf, and around the corner a Muslim couple. WOW!

Doctor Q
Aug 8, 2004, 02:06 AM
wow, in this day and age that's amazing that he has stayed put that much...how old is he?He was middle aged, I'd guess. I think traveling makes you a more interesting person (whether to get out of the big city if you live in one or to go see one if you don't), but when they were handing out the wanderlust, he didn't get his share.

LimeiBook86
Aug 8, 2004, 02:17 AM
I live in a sh**hole caled Sweden (it's the name of a town), in the middle of nowhere, in the state of Maine. It has 300 people, and most of them suck.

There is no high-speed broadband for 50km out, there is no cell phone service, there are no traffic lights, there are no stores anywhere in the town, and the whole area (this town, almost every town over, and the town nearest to that) is filled with rednecks that live behind cigarettes, a stupid accent, pick-up trucks, a serious lack of responsibility, and mentally-corrupting lateness in terms of expectations as to when they'll show up at your house, complete a job for you, or both. It absolutely sucks!! Maine sucks, because it's filled with such people. I hate it here...I want to move back [to New Jersey], because none of the above hardships got in the way. The only people that aren't like that are the ones that live about 100km south and east near the coast and in the larger cities, like Portland, Westbrook, Saco, and maybe Wells, because they are far more responsible and intelligent than some of the people up in Sweden, Maine.

Wow, pardon my language, but that really sucks man. I live in central New Jersey so I know about what you probably were used to. Maybe after college or something you can move out and back to NJ.

Hope you get back home soon, NJ is a pretty nice place to live.

:D

evilgEEk
Aug 8, 2004, 03:10 AM
Born and raised in a town of roughly 4,000 in Southern Idaho. Okay, technically I was born at the hospital a half hour away in the largest town in Southern Idaho, which is 30,000.

Basically, there's four parts of Idaho: Eastern, Southern, Northern and the Capital. Eastern has two cities that are roughly 30-40,000, Southern has a town of 30,000, Northern has nothing bigger than around 20,000 (and that's only one) and then the Capital. This area (where I currently reside) is around 300,000.

But I'm still a small-town boy raised on a farm 15 miles away from anything, which my dad still owns and runs.

Ahhh...the good ol' days...

takao
Aug 8, 2004, 07:48 AM
i live in Dornbirn an austrian small town with a little bit under 50.000 people and it's the biggest town in Vorarlberg..if you want a bigger one you have to drive across the border into switzerland or across the mountains into Tyrol (innsbruck,where i study, has about 125.000 ) or across the border to germany

and i added a picture: the red dot is approx. our house
sadly sight was bad and the mountains on the swiss side are invisble and the lake constance as well

http://forums.macrumors.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=15836&stc=1

Knox
Aug 8, 2004, 08:14 AM
I live in a village of a few thousand, although we're on the outskirts of a city so not exactly in the middle of nowhere.

However, this thread reminded me of some info about Pitcairn Island I read recently, at least in terms of lack of people and lack of 'civilisation'.

http://www.government.pn/notesvis.htm

Some highlights -

* Reached by sea only (middle of the Pacific), $800-1000 one way, boats only visit a few times a year.
* 48 permanent residents
* Electricity available 9 hours a day
* Communication only via satellite in evening/night
* Only shop open 3 times a week, some foods need to be ordered months in advance

Earendil
Aug 8, 2004, 11:13 AM
I live 7 miles outside of "White Salmon", WA pop. 3000.
Where I live I think the expected date for Cable/DSL is some time in the year 2083 :o
The County stopped paving the road 1/2mi from our drive way because they ran out of money. They don't plan on starting the project again, at least not in the next 5 years.

In town, they have both Cable and DSL in most places, But I credit that to living in the Columbia Gorge, the best passage accross the Norther Cascades mountains, and where a lot of fatty pipe lines run through.
Speaking of which, I have a side note. I thought the point of the internet/telephone system was that it could withstand taking a hole in it, and find a different route because of it's web like infastructure?
Not out here. Someone backhowed the main line through the Columbia Gorge, and all long distance calling for White Salmon, Hood River (neighor city in OR) and the surrounding area lost connection with the outside world. No net, and it killed 3 cell towers as well. Bravo guys.

Anyway. The HS I decided not to go to had 400 kids (9-12) with 83 kids graduation last year. I was home schooled... and some people wonder why...

The nearest city is Hood River, pop 8000 perhaps. It's a 15 minute drive between towns, and a $.75 toll across the bridge. It has a Cinema though, so that's why we go over there. The largest city actually worth visiting is Portland, OR, 60 miles away. I don't know the pop of Portland, but it's well over 100K, and has an international airport, so I'm happy ;)

Tyler

ps
only one light in white salmon, and it's the flashing red kind, nothing as complecated as a green/yellow/red around here, it would probably cause wrecks :rolleyes:
First Mcdonalds was in 2001 or 2002, and was build along Highway 14, just outside city limits, so I don't even know if that counts...

Hoef
Aug 8, 2004, 11:29 AM
Arlington, VA is pretty small from what I am used too :p

Chip NoVaMac
Aug 8, 2004, 12:47 PM
Just moved to Warsaw, Indiana - population 13,000 -

I have to say its a nice change from all the stress I had in DC :D

D

I know what you mean. My sanity is kept since I "live" in Herndon VA (19,000 population). Not quite the 2,000 in my parents hometown of Jewett City CT. But since I hate commutes, it offers some of the small town feel. If I could get over the DC commute, I would love to live in Berryville Va, with its 3,000.

Maybe it is because I spent vacations in a small town, but I have a love of that way of life. As a kid it is hard. I couldn't spit without my folks knowing. Yet years later I went for a funeral for an uncle, and was short on cash. The ATM wasn't on my "network". I went in to the bank hoping they would cash a check. High hopes to do the same in most any big city. The woman at the desk looked at me a bit strangely before I could even say a word.

She said, "you are one of the <name removed for privacey> boys, aren't you?". "That was my Mom's family, yep", I replied. She expressed her condolences, and asked what I needed. Said that I needed to cash a check. No problem. I handed my check and ID, and she handed my ID back. She even asked if I wanted to re-write the check for a larger amount.

Years later I was on a photo road trip. Passing through a WV small town (two stoplights, I am not kidding) on a Sunday morning, decided to stop at a church for Sunday Services. They had a meet and greet afterwards. One of the parishioners came up and introduced themselves, and remarked that i was not from around there. Told her that I was on a photo road trip. She asked where my destination was. I told her basically where ever the road leads me. She called over her husband and her minister and told them of what I was doing. Her husband starting asking me questions about photography. Then out of the blue, she said that no one should travel alone on a Sunday, at least without a good meal. And she would not take no for an answer. The minister said that her word was the "law" in the town. I graciously accepted.

After the meal, I thanked them, and begged my leave. It did no good. The husband wanted to take me to a lake at sunset that he found to give great picture opportunities. And of course it would be to late for me to hit the road to find a place for the night, so I was their guest. No if, buts, or maybes about it.

Sorry for the long post. But this thread has brought back many memories of my travels through small towns. I thought I would share a couple. There are so many other examples.

I am thankful that there have been people in my life that have shown me what goodness is about. Just wish there was a bit more of that in the Big City.

Chip NoVaMac
Aug 8, 2004, 12:59 PM
wow, in this day and age that's amazing that he has stayed put that much...how old is he?

i have a friend who has stayed in northern california his whole life (or 99+ percent of it) and only ventured out three times in his 32 years...a two week trip to vancouver, bc, a two week trip to seattle, wa, and a month long trip to southern california (los angeles)...he has never been more than a hundred miles from the pacific ocean!!! in other words, he has hugged the pacific coastline, or relatively near, of just the west coast of the usa and canada and his personal/political/social viewpoints are often just made from the point of view of his city of 29,000, the five or six surrounding cities, and the far off places up and down highway 1 or highway 101...we live close to the central valley and we live close to the sierra nevada and he has seen neither...next time my wife and i go somewhere outside of his sphere, we should take him ;)

to me, he is the most insulated person i have ever met in my life...california is a big state so there are probably a lot of people who have gone 30 years or more and have never left its borders...and there must be someone here from hawaii, samoa, or the virgin islands who has lived decades and never set foot outside of their general area

On a trip to the Smoky's, I ate at a restaurant that I chatted up with the waitress. I mentioned something about the nice life down there and some sort of tax (forgot if it was sales, income, property tax, or some such tax). She looked at me as if I was speaking greek. The Hostess came by, and she asked about the "tax". The Hostess roared with laughter (she was from CT), and explained how the rest of the states worked. It turns out that the waitress had never been out of TN for her 21 years.

Chip NoVaMac
Aug 8, 2004, 01:02 PM
Wow, pardon my language, but that really sucks man. I live in central New Jersey so I know about what you probably were used to. Maybe after college or something you can move out and back to NJ.

Hope you get back home soon, NJ is a pretty nice place to live.

:D

Broadband is about the only thing that keeps me from a small town. Commuting is not bad for me, since my boss allows me to work from home but for about two days a week. But to do it on dial up would kill me.

iJon
Aug 8, 2004, 03:07 PM
my town has about 65,000, totaling about 80,000 when school is in session (the university). actually our area is one of the top fastest growing areas in the country, thanks to tyson, wal-mart and the other billion dollars business within a drive's distance. the rest of arkansas is usually filled with a million towns that don't top 1,000 people.

iJon

wdlove
Aug 8, 2004, 04:33 PM
I grew up out in the country. It was sparsely populated when my parents first built the house. On our section of the road just one other house in 1952. We didn't have a high school in our township till 1962. Since then I've lived in larger areas.