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ucfgrad93
Feb 24, 2010, 07:17 PM
A killer whale killed a SeaWorld Orlando trainer who slipped or fell in its tank Wednesday, drowning her in front of a horrified audience.

Dan Brown, president of the Orlando park, said the trainer was one of the park's most experienced.

He would not answer questions about whether it happened during a performance, but an audience member said a show was just starting.

Wow, this is so sad. I have been to this particular SeaWorld many times. I love the shows, especially the killer whales.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,587368,00.html

MacDawg
Feb 24, 2010, 07:18 PM
Tragic

Thoughts and prayers with families and friends
:(

acurafan
Feb 24, 2010, 07:19 PM
see, i told them to free willy...no they say...

killer whale: "what am i, here for your amusement??"

ravenvii
Feb 24, 2010, 09:43 PM
The actual article and whatever you quoted looks like completely different stories. The trainer didn't just slip or fall into the tank,

A SeaWorld killer whale snatched a trainer off a poolside platform in its jaws Wednesday and thrashed the woman around underwater, killing her in front of a horrified audience. It marked the third time the animal had been involved in a human death.

emiljan
Feb 24, 2010, 10:27 PM
Another tragic death because of stupid ignorance.

Seriously what part of "killer whale" do these people not get.

ucfgrad93
Feb 24, 2010, 10:42 PM
The actual article and whatever you quoted looks like completely different stories. The trainer didn't just slip or fall into the tank,

They must have updated the page, because I just copied then pasted for the quote.

That is just terrible. The question now, is what to do with the whale.

elppa
Feb 24, 2010, 11:04 PM
The question now, is what to do with the whale.

Personally I think this tragedy should mean that an end it put to this practice. I mean look at the statistics… no amount of spin can make them anything other than terrible. You can't keep whales in a tank. Or if you can, we're not doing it right.

● At least 136 orcas (killer whales) have been taken into captivity from the wild since 1961. One hundred and twenty (120) are now dead (88%).

● Of the 120 which died, average length of survival in captivity is approximately 6.5 years (range: 1 day - 28 years).

● Most captives die before they reach their early 20s, yet in the wild, females may live as long as 80 years or more.

● As of January 2008, a total of 44 orcas (15 wild-caught and 29 captive-born calves) are held in 12 marine parks in six different countries.

● Of 83 known pregnancies in captivity since 1968, only 38 captive-born calves (46%) have survived to 12 months or over (43 orcas calves didn’t survive 12 months; while ‘Stella’ in Kamogawa Sea World is currently 11 months old and Malia in Sea World Florida is currently 10 months old).

● The current number of known orcas to have died in captivity is 148 (this does not include stillbirths, miscarriages or unborn calves were the mother died).

And the captures are all full of class and care. Here's a nice account from wikipedia:
At approximately 6 years-old, Lolita was captured on August 8th, 1970 while enroute southward with her family pod (known as L-25) to the annual migration and rendezvous in Possession Sound off the southeast end of Whidbey Island. The pod was spotted by air and word was sent to Seattle Marine Aquarium owner Ted Griffin and Don Goldsberry of Sea World who were waiting with speedboats and explosives. During the operation, eighty orcas were rounded up; amongst the eighty, four juvenile orcas and one female adult were killed. While trapped in the capture-net, the four juveniles were unable to reach the surface to breathe and consequently drowned. In the case of the adult female, the orca drowned when she also became tangled in a net while attempting to reach her calf. In order to conceal the deaths from the public, all five of the whales had their bellies slit open and filled with rocks, their tails weighted down with anchors and chains. The facts surrounding their deaths were discovered three months later after three of the dead whales washed ashore on Whidbey Island.

eawmp1
Feb 24, 2010, 11:31 PM
Let's keep our PETA tirades to ourselves for today. A woman, living her lifelong dream to work with orcas died doing what she loved. Details are still emerging as to the precise circumstances. Our thoughs go to her family, coworkers, and witnesses to this tragedy.

elppa
Feb 24, 2010, 11:52 PM
Let's keep our PETA tirades to ourselves for today.

That is a good way to marginalise those with alternative viewpoints. Put them in the PETA tirade box. Whatever works for you.

I have every sympathy for those involved. It is, as I said, a tragedy.

Henri Gaudier
Feb 25, 2010, 04:40 AM
I'd close all these places down in a shot if I had the authority. Seeing animals in cages, metaphorical ones in the case of Sea World, fills me with disgust. It's only the lack of empathy in the dopes that go that keep these businesses alive. For the love of everything wild stop going to these hell holes. My only hope is that the animal will be released into the wild but I doubt it.

j/k/Andy
Feb 25, 2010, 04:53 AM
Seems like these animals are just not suited to captivity, interesting related story about ending elephant displays at zoos - http://www.hsus.org/wildlife/wildlife_news/detroit_zoo_sends_its_elephants_packing_should_others_follow_suit.html

Peterkro
Feb 25, 2010, 04:56 AM
I'd close all these places down in a shot if I had the authority. Seeing animals in cages, metaphorical ones in the case of Sea World, fills me with disgust. It's only the lack of empathy in the dopes that go that keep these businesses alive. For the love of everything wild stop going to these hell holes. My only hope is that the animal will be released into the wild but I doubt it.

Don't be surprised if the more loony of our U.S. brethren call for the animals execution.

greygray
Feb 25, 2010, 05:09 AM
This is truly tragic. My condolences to the late trainer's family. :(

GoCubsGo
Feb 25, 2010, 05:11 AM
They must have updated the page, because I just copied then pasted for the quote.

That is just terrible. The question now, is what to do with the whale.

You let the whale go! There should be no question there.

I feel for the woman and her family but if someone suggests the whale to be put down then they're crazy. This is a wild animal not meant to be a show pony. It's been going on for ages and they do treat the whales well, but it's still wild and will likely always have that instinct.

Such a tragedy though and very sad on many levels.

bmacir
Feb 25, 2010, 05:59 AM
You let the whale go! There should be no question there.

I'm not sure that's something that can be done easily.

I have to be honest, I have been to the show in 2008, and I must say that at the time I enjoyed it, a lot. I thought it was very well done. Of course, after reading this thread, I would not support again the show.

My younger daughter loved it, she has a delay in her development and at the time she was 3, she did not speak much and I was not sure if she was able to remember or make reference to facts that she experienced. She still remembers Shamu and since that day every time she sees a killer whale on a book she says "Shamu-Shamu".
My other daughter, since seeing the dolphin show in San Diego, wants to work with dolphins.

I understand all the hate and controversy this story can bring, but today is a tragic day for a lady who lived her life for the orcas and loved them and was killed by one, there is no reason to bash or discuss the rightfulness of these type of shows. Let's leave this discussion to another thread.

I just wanted to share my story to disclose that, although controversial, these shows, made by people who dedicate their life to these animals, have made some good to someone.

ss957916
Feb 25, 2010, 06:04 AM
No sympathy. They're wild animals - it's to be expected.

All the people who have paid to gawp at this ridiculous spectacle in the past, keeping the theme park open, are equally to blame for this tragedy.

instaxgirl
Feb 25, 2010, 06:29 AM
I'd close all these places down in a shot if I had the authority. Seeing animals in cages, metaphorical ones in the case of Sea World, fills me with disgust.

I feel deeply uneasy every time I go to Seaworld or the zoo. Just can never quite shake that feeling, and I normally don't care about animals in any special way. Yet I understand why we have them.

You let the whale go! There should be no question there.

I feel for the woman and her family but if someone suggests the whale to be put down then they're crazy. This is a wild animal not meant to be a show pony.

Can they let it go? That one's been in captivity for at least 19 years according to that article (he first was involved in someone's death in 1991). And this is the third death this whale's been mixed up in, although the 2nd sounds like a Darwin Award incident.

I thought they'd have to put it down. Can't release it, can't trust it to be tame, only a dozen trainers would work with it before and I bet that number'll go down now.

ss957916
Feb 25, 2010, 06:40 AM
According to a colleague speaking on the news, "she loved [the whales] to death".

Not the best choice of words.

eawmp1
Feb 25, 2010, 07:09 AM
That is a good way to marginalise those with alternative viewpoints. Put them in the PETA tirade box. Whatever works for you.

I have every sympathy for those involved. It is, as I said, a tragedy.

You politicized a death. Your intentions may be noble, but your timing is off.

rdowns
Feb 25, 2010, 07:11 AM
How about not putting the largest mammals on the planet in ****ing swimming pools for tourists to come and gawk at?

zioxide
Feb 25, 2010, 07:13 AM
you know they call them KILLER whales for a reason.

iGary
Feb 25, 2010, 07:19 AM
How about not putting the largest mammals on the planet in ****ing swimming pools for tourists to come and gawk at?

Sounds like a good start.

It's criminal what we do to these magnificent creatures, honestly.

miles01110
Feb 25, 2010, 07:24 AM
At least Great White Sharks really stick it to us by dying almost immediately when placed in a large tank.

NeuralControl
Feb 25, 2010, 07:31 AM
This is such a sad story. My condolences go out to the poor woman's family.
I really hope they do not put down the whale. The whale should either be taken out of the shows for good and left at SeaWorld, or transferred to another facility for the remainder of its life.

GoCubsGo
Feb 25, 2010, 07:34 AM
Can they let it go? That one's been in captivity for at least 19 years according to that article (he first was involved in someone's death in 1991). And this is the third death this whale's been mixed up in, although the 2nd sounds like a Darwin Award incident.

I thought they'd have to put it down. Can't release it, can't trust it to be tame, only a dozen trainers would work with it before and I bet that number'll go down now.

That's a good point and one to consider. I don't agree with killing it though. Perhaps sticking it in a tank for the remainder of his life is key, albeit sad, but you're right. And yes, this isn't the first incident for this whale. After the first they really should not have attempted to tame it.

iGary
Feb 25, 2010, 07:35 AM
That's a good point and one to consider. I don't agree with killing it though. Perhaps sticking it in a tank for the remainder of his life is key, albeit sad, but you're right. And yes, this isn't the first incident for this whale. After the first they really should not have attempted to tame it.

It's failed miserable in the past. Remember Keiko (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keiko_(orca))?

niuniu
Feb 25, 2010, 07:45 AM
The articles are a bit wooly, did the trainer drown because the whale had her in it's jaws and held her underwater?

Edit: Some news reports say the whale jumped up and grabbed her and pulled her into the water, others say she fell in

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1xZwxkcoDU&feature=channel

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcReDJelSBA

RayStar
Feb 25, 2010, 10:45 AM
you know they call them KILLER whales for a reason.

YES. I say they should release it back to the ocean. NOW!

sushi
Feb 25, 2010, 10:59 AM
Sad story.

On a positive note, she was doing what she loved when she died.

Interesting that killer whales come from the dolphin family and that they eat dolphins.

63dot
Feb 25, 2010, 11:04 AM
Another tragic death because of stupid ignorance.

Seriously what part of "killer whale" do these people not get.

When I saw the opening of the killer whale slasher flick Orca (the one where the opening scene is where the killer whale eats a great white like a potato chip), I inquired with the harbor master in my area, and also a marine biologist for Stanford Hopkins.

While a killer whale is not smart enough to blow up an entire village, as in the film, they have no issues about thrashing a great white shark. I never thought it was a great idea to have tiny humans in the tank with a killer whale.

These things are not only very long, they are massive and the most effective killing machines in the ocean. Unlike cold blooded sharks, the warm blooded killer whale needs to eat an exceedingly large amount of many types of prey. Us humans are smaller than what are on the plate of some killer whales.

MattSepeta
Feb 25, 2010, 11:17 AM
No sympathy. They're wild animals - it's to be expected.

All the people who have paid to gawp at this ridiculous spectacle in the past, keeping the theme park open, are equally to blame for this tragedy.

Agreed. Its terribly sad, and condolences to all involved, but c,mon!

My sister is studying Marine Biology and plans on working against this type of "animal performance", as well as working to make sure that when these shows are put on, that the highest level of concern for the animals are met.

instaxgirl
Feb 25, 2010, 11:33 AM
At least Great White Sharks really stick it to us by dying almost immediately when placed in a large tank.

Huh, anyone know why?

After the first they really should not have attempted to tame it.

That was my first thought.

TuffLuffJimmy
Feb 25, 2010, 11:41 AM
This is too sad. It's just one more reason why we shouldn't keep whales in tanks like that.

jonbravo77
Feb 25, 2010, 11:42 AM
They will probably kill the whale, can't be put back in the wild and can't be kept at Sea World. That is the real tragedy. Sorry, I have no sympathy for people who interact with a wild animal and expect it to behave in a tame manner. I get sick of stories where people are swimming in the ocean, get attacked by a shark and the shark gets hunted down and killed.

We as humans have very little regard to things that we deem "below" us. We as humans need to understand that we are not the top of the food chain outside of living next to a super walmart and that we should have respect for nature. But we as humans are an arrogant bunch of pricks who think we can put a 10 ton animal in a pool and go swimming with it expecting nothing will happen. <End of rant>

eawmp1
Feb 25, 2010, 12:08 PM
My sister is studying Marine Biology and plans on working against this type of "animal performance", as well as working to make sure that when these shows are put on, that the highest level of concern for the animals are met.

Your sister seems to be conflicted.

But we as humans are an arrogant bunch of pricks who think we can put a 10 ton animal in a pool and go swimming with it expecting nothing will happen. <End of rant>

Trainers were not allowed to be in the water with Tilikum, the orca in question, due to his history.

rdowns
Feb 25, 2010, 12:08 PM
Wait, I bet her family files a law suit by the middle of March.

jonbravo77
Feb 25, 2010, 12:10 PM
Trainers were not allowed to be in the water with Tilikum, the orca in question, due to his history.

Missed my point, thanks for playing.... But yet, they allowed the trainer to be around this whale and still put the whale in the show...

63dot
Feb 25, 2010, 12:13 PM
Huh, anyone know why?



Marine biologists are the Monterey Bay Aquarium had a great white for some time and then released it in Mexico in a closed off, netted bay, so it could adjust, and then planned to let it go off into the open ocean. Sadly, the great white shark, about five years old, died while in the transition period.

It was an usually cruel and stupid experiment, especially with the horrible track record humans have with great white sharks in captivity.

Stanford Hopkins, Cal State University Monterey Bay, and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute were not in agreement that taking a great white from its natural habitat was a good idea. Some great whites have lived only two weeks or less in captivity.

Some have suggested that these magnificent animals need to have the will to hunt in order to have the will to survive. But if you feed it like a circus animal, and then you have an unhealthy fish.

A more recent accidental catch of another younger great white resulted, like most instances in the world, of not accepting food from humans when put into a large tank. The aquarium released the shark.

eawmp1
Feb 25, 2010, 12:14 PM
Missed my point, thanks for playing.... But yet, they allowed the trainer to be around this whale and still put the whale in the show...

No, didn't miss the point of your rant at all. Just clearing up a specific factoid about this particular episode for you and those above who think this particular orca's potential/history was not respected by the Seaworld training staff.

jonbravo77
Feb 25, 2010, 12:25 PM
No, didn't miss the point of your rant at all. Just clearing up a specific factoid about this particular episode for you and those above who think this particular orca's potential/history was not respected by the Seaworld training staff.

Again, how was this orca respected if it had a history but they allowed it to perform anyway in front of a crowd with a trainer nearby?

eawmp1
Feb 25, 2010, 12:54 PM
This orca was never going to get anywhere near a crowd to cause the general public any harm. Tilikum came to Seaworld in 1992, and the trainer began there in 1994. She was one of a few of the trainers allowed poolside (out of water) with this orca. This orca was treated with caution.

However, when dealing with animals (wild in captivity or in the wild, or domesticated), there is ALWAYS an element of the random. Whether the family dog that mauls a child, a stingray spearing Steve Irwin, a horse thrrowing its rider - human-animal interactions are sometimes fatal. I'm not sure a "lay person" has the ability to armchair quarterback this situation.

TuffLuffJimmy
Feb 25, 2010, 12:58 PM
However, when dealing with animals (wild in captivity or in the wild, or domesticated), there is ALWAYS an element of the random. Whether the family dog that mauls a child, a stingray spearing Steve Irwin, a horse thrrowing its rider - human-animal interactions are sometimes fatal. I'm not sure a "lay person" has the ability to armchair quarterback this situation.

The difference between this attack and a random dog mauling is that orcas are smart, cunning, killing machines. Dogs are stupid, mostly docile, love buddies.

Orcas aren't meant to be in tanks, nor are they meant to do shows to make a park money. Dogs, for the most part, are engineered to live with humans.

Orcas are not domesticated and should not be treated as such

jaw04005
Feb 25, 2010, 01:21 PM
We went to Seaworld San Antonio a few years, and the Shamu show was just amazing.

It’s a double-edged sword. I’m sure Seaworld and other parks like it have really raised awareness about the threats to Orcas, dolphins and other sea life. Before we had Seaworld, these creatures were being hunted on a regular basis to the point where they were becoming endangered.

But then again there’s so many downsides to captivity like this.

It’s just sad all around. There’s no way they can release the Orcas kept in captivity into the wild. So, I don’t know what the answer is.

jonbravo77
Feb 25, 2010, 02:29 PM
This orca was never going to get anywhere near a crowd to cause the general public any harm. Tilikum came to Seaworld in 1992, and the trainer began there in 1994. She was one of a few of the trainers allowed poolside (out of water) with this orca. This orca was treated with caution.

However, when dealing with animals (wild in captivity or in the wild, or domesticated), there is ALWAYS an element of the random. Whether the family dog that mauls a child, a stingray spearing Steve Irwin, a horse thrrowing its rider - human-animal interactions are sometimes fatal. I'm not sure a "lay person" has the ability to armchair quarterback this situation.

Well I guess this "lay person" doesn't get your point if you have any to make. We are talking about a whale with a history of violence that was still allowed to perform with trainers around. You say that "the orca was never going to get anywhere near a crowd to cause the general public any harm" I guess we should tell that to the parents when their kids have nightmares about what they saw. The difference (and this was in my original post) is that when the "random" happens it's not the human that gets blamed or put down, it's the animal. And they get killed for what, for being an animal and following natural instincts.

I'm sorry for the rants but it pisses me off when animals do not get treated with the respect they deserve. They SHOULD NOT be taken from the wild for our enjoyment (unless in extreme circumstances where they can put in a zoo, cared for properly, not try to get played with by a human and given as close to a natural habitat as possible). There is a reason these events happen, but as arrogant humans we do not like to see those reasons and think we are all so righteous to do with what we please to what we have deemed a lower species. I am not a part of PETA but they have some very good view points (and some very bad ones) Sorry for the rant, again...


EDIT.... The real sad part is that in most of the news stories including the one the OP linked it says in there that the witnesses that were interviewed said the whales seemed agitated. Some saw the earlier show and came back for the second one, and in the earlier show Tilikum was not responding to commands and was acting like a pissy child. So the audience saw these behaviors but the trainers did not and therefore did nothing to prevent this. What the news report on BBC is http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8535618.stm

Peterkro
Feb 25, 2010, 02:34 PM
There’s no way they can release the Orcas kept in captivity into the wild. So, I don’t know what the answer is.

I haven't been able to find out the age of this Orca when it was captured but if it was six or older it's quite possible with some transition work it may well be able to be returned to the wild.It would have no predators after all.

jaw04005
Feb 26, 2010, 02:09 PM
Looks like Seaworld will resume the Shamu shows tomorrow. Trainers will not get in the water with the Orcas (which sort of takes away the coolest part of the show).

http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/02/26/florida.seaworld.death/index.html?hpt=T1

Mixed feelings all around.

Part of me thinks people wouldn’t give a damn about sea life if it wasn’t for Seaworld and other marine zoos, and another part of me thinks animals should be free.

BrianKonarsMac
Feb 26, 2010, 03:43 PM
Can they let it go? That one's been in captivity for at least 19 years according to that article (he first was involved in someone's death in 1991). And this is the third death this whale's been mixed up in, although the 2nd sounds like a Darwin Award incident.

I thought they'd have to put it down. Can't release it, can't trust it to be tame, only a dozen trainers would work with it before and I bet that number'll go down now.

Seriously?

You can't trust it to be tame so the only reasonable conclusion you could think of is to kill it?

I weep for society. I like how you are caring enough to call the 2nd death this whale was involved in a Darwin Award incident - you should send that to the persons family.

TuffLuffJimmy
Feb 26, 2010, 04:01 PM
Seriously?

You can't trust it to be tame so the only reasonable conclusion you could think of is to kill it?

I weep for society. I like how you are caring enough to call the 2nd death this whale was involved in a Darwin Award incident - you should send that to the persons family.

Seriously. Some people are dense enough to believe that animals are only here for our enjoyment. So what if it's not tame? Are lions at zoos tame? No. Should we put them all down?

If anything this whale should be retaught to hunt and released, or at worst SeaWorld should do what they said they'd do and only use it for breeding, not shows.

instaxgirl
Feb 26, 2010, 06:35 PM
Seriously?

You can't trust it to be tame so the only reasonable conclusion you could think of is to kill it?

I weep for society. I like how you are caring enough to call the 2nd death this whale was involved in a Darwin Award incident - you should send that to the persons family.

It's not tame and it's been in captivity for most of its life. The reports I've read of captive whales being released into the wild haven't had positive results, but hey I'm not a scholar on the subject. Maybe it does work out for the best more often than not, but it hasn't seemed that way to me from the accounts I've read.

Send it to a facility instead then and hope no other accidents take place. A lot of animals would be put down after incidents like this, which is tragic since the blame is on us for trying to tame them in the first place, but if the animal can't be released and is a danger to humans then putting it down is what I would expect to happen. I didn't say I supported the decision, I said it's what I thought would happen.

And did you read the circumstances of the 2nd death? A visitor snuck past security and got into the enclosures where they kept this whale. I referred to it as a Darwin Award incident 'cause the article seemed to cast doubts on the whale's involvement in it being (for lack of a better word) malicious. I was being flippant, but my only other comment is that someone who sneaks past security to go get a closer look at a killer whale is seriously lacking in common sense - that any less offensive? Tragic death yes, but it would never have happened had this visitor not been so out and out dumb. Sorry that I'm not caring enough for you.

Seriously. Some people are dense enough to believe that animals are only here for our enjoyment.

Thanks for that. I'm one of the people who doesn't particularly enjoy Seaworld etc.

jonbravo77
Feb 26, 2010, 08:12 PM
I find it sadistic that they are going to let this whale perform, saying (once again) that the trainers are not allowed in the water (which was the rule when this incident happened) and have another crowd of families more than likely watch another person die all to make a buck. I don't know if there is a place that this whale can go to to live out the rest of it's life without being put on display but there should be. I would love to see the whale be put back in to the wild but I don't think that is possible. But anything is better than this crap....

flopticalcube
Feb 26, 2010, 08:18 PM
I find it sadistic that they are going to let this whale perform, saying (once again) that the trainers are not allowed in the water (which was the rule when this incident happened) and have another crowd of families more than likely watch another person die all to make a buck. I don't know if there is a place that this whale can go to to live out the rest of it's life without being put on display but there should be. I would love to see the whale be put back in to the wild but I don't think that is possible. But anything is better than this crap....

Bob McDonald does a good job of explaining why Tillikum cannot be returned to the wild. http://www.cbc.ca/technology/quirks-blog/2010/02/what-to-do-with-a-killer-whale.html

BTW, killer "whales" are actually the largest member of the dolphin family.

srf4real
Feb 27, 2010, 10:11 AM
Dawn Brancheau was taken in the place where her heart was happiest. I hope my demise can be the same... and these shows are astounding, must see. The most intelligent mammals on earth get joy from performing for us lowly humans, yes. And free food! Tillikum is a jealous stud - these whales loved Dawn.

In memory of Dawn,

http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee126/surferRob_photos/SEAWORLD03.jpg
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee126/surferRob_photos/SEAWORLDO2.jpg
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee126/surferRob_photos/SEAWORLD01.jpg

R.Perez
Feb 27, 2010, 09:01 PM
I am sure the trainer loved the animals in question, not a doubt in my mind about this.

I am sure most if not all trainers at aquatic parks like Sea World got involved because they loved the animals.

The fact is however, animals do NOT belong in tanks.

Frankly I don't think animals should be domesticated at all.

Dogs and Cats are so far domesticated there is no other choice, but aside from that, this practice must stop.

In fact I would even go as far as saying that until the homeless pet problem gets solved not a single one should be bred.

Unfortunately that will never happen.

Anyway, as much as the trainers love these animals, that love is misguided.

Anyone who loves these animals, should know that they are happiest in their natural habitat, which is free in the ocean where they belong.

Trainers aside, Sea World does not care about animal advocacy, I suggest anyone wanting to know more, should watch the Cove.

Companies like Sea World have been supporting marine mammal hunts for years.

Only recently did Sea World stop publicly supporting these practices but still to this day refuses to condemn them.

I hope one day, all animals can once again roam free.

BornAgainMac
Mar 1, 2010, 05:58 AM
I wonder if Sea World had given the whale any types of "Antidepressants" type drugs to calm it down for shows. The whales are confined to a small area and I can see the whales getting depressed to justify the reason for giving that drug to a whale. I have noticed with humans that go crazy with shootings or killings that over 90% of the time they are taking those kinds of drugs as mentioned in the news. It is just a theory.

One of the experts that talked about whales mentioned that usually when an animal does this it is linked to humans in some way. I am surprised on day one how someone can survive in a tank with Killer Whales. It just blows my mind how in a Sea World show you can see humans and Killer Whales swimming around.

elppa
Mar 1, 2010, 07:06 AM
I am surprised on day one how someone can survive in a tank with Killer Whales. It just blows my mind how in a Sea World show you can see humans and Killer Whales swimming around.
It's an interesting theory, but many of Animals even "predators" like Wolves, Lions and Orcas can and will develop relationships/bonds (whatever you want to call it) with humans. Just because an Animal could tear us to shreds, doesn't meant it will.

Let's not forget Orca's are members of the Dolphin family, the same Dolphin Family who are quite happy to step in when people are in danger (http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2004/11/24/dolphin_newzealand041124.html).

BornAgainMac
Mar 1, 2010, 03:43 PM
My boss mentioned that someone had it on video. The way the lady was moving her hair and the whale moving his head with each swing may have caused the whale to think of it as a toy. Maybe it will be on youtube. I haven't seen the footage on the news yet.

gkarris
Mar 1, 2010, 08:28 PM
Hello?

KILLLER Whale.... :eek:

Hello?

:rolleyes:

Abstract
Mar 2, 2010, 03:21 AM
I really hope they do not put down the whale. The whale should either be taken out of the shows for good and left at SeaWorld, or transferred to another facility for the remainder of its life.

It doesn't sound like that animal has really 'lived' anyway. They may not live long in the wild, but they don't have a great number of enemies in the ocean anyway, and at least it will be free to swim as a whale should. I can't imagine being stuck in my bedroom for years, even if my parents fed me and treated me well.

When it's a girl kept in an Austrian cellar by her father for 18 years, we feel symathy for the captive, and yet in this situation, we should feel for the persons involved just because they like their job? It's so messed up.

And I agree completely with R.Perez.

srf4real
Mar 7, 2010, 08:22 AM
I don't particularly like the fact that these wild beasts are held captive either, but at a place like Sea World the pros far outweigh the cons imo. Not many folks are able or bold enough to attempt an excursion into the wild to familiarize themselves with the orca or any other marvelous predator that rules their domain in the wild. The majority of world population does not even get to see the way of wild - living in dense population centers and far from where these things take place.

Were it not for this and other public exhibitions, most folks would go about their daily business never considering the majestic beauty and value to our world of these and many other species of mammals, fish, ocean creatures... in the same way that when a visitor to the zoo becomes concerned with the possibility of extinction of the silverback, panda, snow leopard, etc... and becomes involved in the preservation process... because of Sea World countless future marine scientists have been inspired to leave their native Milwaukee and do something to better our world and God's creation. So it ain't all bad in my book.

I have the luxury of swimming with dolphins, sea turtles, multitudes of fishes and watching the entire food chain work uninhibited on an almost daily basis, because I live on the Atlantic coast and the scientists have done some good to preserve the balance of nature where it belongs around here. If it were left up to the politicians and businessmen without education and public awareness, my coast would be a polluted and lifeless oil sludge... it is an epic battle already going on between "progress" and mother nature.

So go to Sea World, see what you are missing and also what you are affecting every time you allow destruction to the earth's native habitats, and get involved in making a difference. The earth's future is not promised - it is a reward.;)

Inconsiderate surfers hop over condominium owners' walls to reach the beach...
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee126/surferRob_photos/barbedwiresunrise-1.jpg