PDA

View Full Version : WaCom Stylus For iPad




dissdnt
Mar 28, 2010, 11:23 PM
Is anyone working on a WaCom style stylus for the iPad? I was thinking if Adobe sold a full fledge Photoshop with a stylus you can buy would be awesome.



zarusoba
Apr 2, 2010, 07:56 AM
It would be great. Apparently a Bluetooth stylus is possible, but there's nothing on the market yet.

Otherwise there's the low-tech but effective Pogo.

spydr
Apr 2, 2010, 08:03 AM
I am not sure you can do much more with pogo that you cannot do with you own finger ;)
I am in the market for a fine tipped stylus that will work like a pen on the iPad and the fact that there isn't one already makes me think it is not possible with the current iPad hardware?

Maximillian
Apr 2, 2010, 08:19 AM
I don't think it'd do pressure sensing unless you could tap it into the bluetooth or wifi. Maybe an iPad dock connector dongle?

PCClone
Apr 2, 2010, 08:29 AM
Is anyone working on a WaCom style stylus for the iPad? I was thinking if Adobe sold a full fledge Photoshop with a stylus you can buy would be awesome.

I am, but running into some technical issues.

Bodhi395
Apr 2, 2010, 08:37 AM
I am not sure you can do much more with pogo that you cannot do with you own finger ;)
I am in the market for a fine tipped stylus that will work like a pen on the iPad and the fact that there isn't one already makes me think it is not possible with the current iPad hardware?

I want the same thing, and have searched around and haven't found anything. All the stylus I see have a more rounded tip for some reason, like the pogo. I think it might be something to do with the hardware capability, but I'm not familiar with exactly how the touchscreen works and interacts with the ipad or iphone to know for sure.

I'm thinking of testing it out by finding a material that will conduct electricity and has a fine point, so that when I hold it, it will work on the touch screen. Anyone have any suggestions on something I could use to test a fine point on the screen?

mrgreen4242
Apr 2, 2010, 09:07 AM
I am not sure you can do much more with pogo that you cannot do with you own finger ;)
I am in the market for a fine tipped stylus that will work like a pen on the iPad and the fact that there isn't one already makes me think it is not possible with the current iPad hardware?

I want the same thing, and have searched around and haven't found anything. All the stylus I see have a more rounded tip for some reason, like the pogo. I think it might be something to do with the hardware capability, but I'm not familiar with exactly how the touchscreen works and interacts with the ipad or iphone to know for sure.

I'm thinking of testing it out by finding a material that will conduct electricity and has a fine point, so that when I hold it, it will work on the touch screen. Anyone have any suggestions on something I could use to test a fine point on the screen?


The reason they are all "fat" tips is because the iPhone screen/software is looking for fingers, which aren't fine little points. It'll ignore small touches from fine pointed tips, thinking they are accidental bumps with other parts of your hand.

Making a fine tipped stylus, even if the device recognized it, isn't going to give you a fine line or anything anyways. The software will just pick the center of your touch location and draw whatever thickness line it wants. ALl a finer point would do is obstruct less of the screen (which has its merits, I admit).

I am, but running into some technical issues.
Obviously I don't know what approach you are taking, or what problems you are having, but I immediately had this same idea when I saw the iPad. My thought was a "standard" capacitive stylus like the Pogo Sketch with a pressure sensor under the foam pad. Take the reading from the sensor and map it to a standard BT keyboard control module, which each level of sensitivity correlated to a different key/character.

With a keyboard sporting over 100 keys, plus various modifiers (shift, control, etc) you should be able to support several hundred levels of pressure, possibly into the 512 levels range that some of the low to mid-level drawing tablets offer. If the software is then just "listening" for keyboard "presses" and using that data in combination with the standard touch interface, you should be golden. That was just my theory, and based on the fact that the iPad supports BT keyboards out of the box, it seemed to make sense. :)

Bodhi395
Apr 2, 2010, 12:40 PM
The reason they are all "fat" tips is because the iPhone screen/software is looking for fingers, which aren't fine little points. It'll ignore small touches from fine pointed tips, thinking they are accidental bumps with other parts of your hand.

Making a fine tipped stylus, even if the device recognized it, isn't going to give you a fine line or anything anyways. The software will just pick the center of your touch location and draw whatever thickness line it wants. ALl a finer point would do is obstruct less of the screen (which has its merits, I admit).


Interesting. Do you think a program could by-pass the normal interface and register the small touches instead of ignoring them?

If it could, all I would want is for the program to give me the option of what size line I had and I could match it up to the size of my fine pointed stylus.

mrgreen4242
Apr 2, 2010, 01:03 PM
Interesting. Do you think a program could by-pass the normal interface and register the small touches instead of ignoring them?

If it could, all I would want is for the program to give me the option of what size line I had and I could match it up to the size of my fine pointed stylus.

No. The touch interface is driven at an OS level, though I suppose apps for jailbroken devices might have access to raw sensor data.

You won't get control of line thickness from a "cone shaped" point sponge-stylus. You need to either have something that detects the pressure of your push in the stylus and sends that info to the iPad via BT or control the thickness via software (line a slider or whatever).

Honestly, I expect some manufacturer to do something similar to what I described in my earlier post sooner rather than later.

gwynne
Apr 2, 2010, 01:07 PM
Aren't Wacom digitizers/styli using a completely different technology than Apple touch devices?

I keep kind of bringing this up every time one of these threads starts, and no one really answers.

I feel like if the capacitive touchscreens were able to do really precise control (like a Wacom digitizer/stylus) we would have already seen something less blunt than the Pogos for the iphone.

mrgreen4242
Apr 2, 2010, 01:17 PM
Aren't Wacom digitizers/styli using a completely different technology than Apple touch devices?

I keep kind of bringing this up every time one of these threads starts, and no one really answers.

I feel like if the capacitive touchscreens were able to do really precise control (like a Wacom digitizer/stylus) we would have already seen something less blunt than the Pogos for the iphone.

Yes, they are completely different types of tech. When I see someone ask about "Wacom-style stylus" I just assume they mean pressure sensitive. The iPhone, and presumably the iPad, have very accurate capacitive touchscreens which solves half the problem, pressure sensitivity would require some additional technology in the stylus though.

gwynne
Apr 2, 2010, 01:19 PM
Yes, they are completely different types of tech. When I see someone ask about "Wacom-style stylus" I just assume they mean pressure sensitive. The iPhone, and presumably the iPad, have very accurate capacitive touchscreens which solves half the problem, pressure sensitivity would require some additional technology in the stylus though.

What do you think the reason is that no one has mass-produced a finer stylus yet? I mean, there are a lot of sketchbook iPhone apps, right?

SpookTheHamster
Apr 2, 2010, 01:24 PM
The Pogo really isn't that bad. I bought one as an experiment and was please with how well it worked with apps such as iSketch. It's a huge improvement over trying to draw with your finger.

It's not pressure sensitive, but the thickness of lines can be adjusted in iSketch. I imagine it'd make a passable solution for drawing on in iPad.

mrgreen4242
Apr 2, 2010, 01:45 PM
What do you think the reason is that no one has mass-produced a finer stylus yet? I mean, there are a lot of sketchbook iPhone apps, right?

Most importantly is the iPhone supports a very limited BT profile. Headphones, mics... anything else? The iPad supports, at least, BT keyboards out of the box. That will help development.

Also, limited market for what will be an expensive accessory. Count on $49+ for something like I described - someone may have thought of a better way to do it, but I don't think there is a CHEAPER way. Would you pay $50 for a pressure sensitive stylus for your iPhone? A couple people probably would, but not many would find it valuable, so it's not practical to make.

The iPad, though, is big enough to be a serious drawing surface, not just a little doodle pad. If the touch screen is accurate enough I suspect we'll see people using it that way, and someone will fill the pressure sensitive stylus need for them.

This is all just my baseless speculation, so take it for what it's worth.

lotusindigo
Apr 2, 2010, 02:21 PM
Another solution that may allow us to sidestep the bluetooth option altogether is to use information from capacitive pressure. When you press down with a finger or Pogo, you make contact with a larger area of the screen than you would if you were only touching it lightly. This information could be used to emulate pressure sensitivity. It is possible, as it was done by Ten One Design with the Macbook trackpad which is also capacitative. The thing is, apparently Apple is not allowing developers to make use of this data.

Ten One Design:
@myronm We can make a pressure sensitive drawing app for the iPad, but Apple will need to loosen API restrictions first.

mrgreen4242
Apr 2, 2010, 02:42 PM
Another solution that may allow us to sidestep the bluetooth option altogether is to use information from capacitive pressure. When you press down with a finger or Pogo, you make contact with a larger area of the screen than you would if you were only touching it lightly. This information could be used to emulate pressure sensitivity. It is possible, as it was done by Ten One Design with the Macbook trackpad which is also capacitative. The thing is, apparently Apple is not allowing developers to make use of this data.

Ten One Design:

I was thinking about that as well... the touch interface is OS driven, so it would require Apple to give more access to the raw sensor data (as I mentioned in an earlier post), but I wonder just how much sensitivity you could achieve this way. I mean, it would be based on how large the contact area was, so assuming they made the tip more cone shaped so it could have a finer point and then get smooshed down to a blunt one, how accurate could it detect? (Not asking you, just hypothetical pondering).

If they could get even 8 levels of distinct pressure sensitivity reliably it would be a good compromise for average users (assuming they kept the $15 price point) who want a better sketching tool, but aren't serious digital artists. For those people, I suspect that a BT based stylus would offer a greater range of pressure detection and would be worth the money.

Good information in your post though... hopefully Apple listens and offers an API for raw touchscreen sensor data.

lotusindigo
Apr 2, 2010, 04:55 PM
I agree that a BT pen would probably be able to give more pressure information than capacitance could. And to be sure, I would pay for it. :D And with a bluetooth pen maybe it might be possible to implement more than pressure sensitivity; maybe tilt, rotation and bearing. Or maybe I'm getting ahead way of myself. :P

PCClone: Make sure to update us on your progress!

JamSoft
Apr 4, 2010, 11:25 PM
I am, but running into some technical issues.
As a graphic designer, I have to say I'm very interested in an App that could work in conjunction with a Stylus type pen for sketching/drawing.

All those working on such a device - keep up the good work. :D Wacom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wacom) included.

zarusoba
Apr 6, 2010, 05:22 AM
I mailed Ten One about a sharper / Bluetooth stylus a few days ago and here's their response:

Thanks for writing. I'm glad the Sketch is working out for you. At this point, we are limited by what touch screens can do. Apple's are set to recognize input from fingers, so a stylus must be roughly the size of a fingertip. It's certainly an area undergoing much development, and we hope to work with display-makers to create a stylus with a finer point.

As for pressure sensitivity, Apple does not currently allow developers direct access to the multitouch hardware on the iPad, iPh and iPt, so the Sketch is unable to utilize this feature. Pressure sensitivity is something that would have to come from the App, not the stylus.

.

gwynne
Apr 6, 2010, 06:24 AM
I mailed Ten One about a sharper / Bluetooth stylus a few days ago and here's their response:

[I]Thanks for writing. I'm glad the Sketch is working out for you. At this point, we are limited by what touch screens can do. Apple's are set to recognize input from fingers, so a stylus must be roughly the size of a fingertip.

Ah, that explains why they're all so blunt.

lotusindigo
Apr 6, 2010, 12:51 PM
I mailed Ten One about a sharper / Bluetooth stylus a few days ago and here's their response:

Thanks for writing. I'm glad the Sketch is working out for you. At this point, we are limited by what touch screens can do. Apple's are set to recognize input from fingers, so a stylus must be roughly the size of a fingertip. It's certainly an area undergoing much development, and we hope to work with display-makers to create a stylus with a finer point.

As for pressure sensitivity, Apple does not currently allow developers direct access to the multitouch hardware on the iPad, iPh and iPt, so the Sketch is unable to utilize this feature. Pressure sensitivity is something that would have to come from the App, not the stylus.

.

... I guess we're not seeing a pressure sensitive bluetooth stylus from them, then. Although I don't think they're understanding the idea of a bluetooth stylus. The pressure sensitivity DOESN'T require direct access to the multitouch hardware. If the stylus itself measures pressure, then it can send that information to apps that can use it. It seems kind of like a, "DUH." :rolleyes: Although, I'm not a dev so maybe I don't know what I'm talking about.

They keep saying on their site that they have something coming for the iPad. I thought they would unveil it when the iPad became available. Nope. They need to just come out with it already, because they're in for a wave of disappointment if they come out with something stupid like an iPad case that holds a Pogo stylus. Who knows, maybe they're waiting for OS 4.0.

Goldenwolf
Apr 6, 2010, 04:38 PM
I've been doing a lot of research on this and did some experimentation after viewing the various "Do it yourself" stylus videos on YouTube.

The touchscreen on the iPhone/iPad works by sensing electrical impulses from your finger. If you were to take a piece of plastic and attempt to use it as a stylus, it wouldn't work because there is no electrical impulse.

However, metal does work because it is conducting electricity from your hand. If you take a pencil and completely wrap it in aluminum foil using the eraser end as a stylus, it works. I also tried the blunt end of a metal Xacto knife and that worked. Both of these were crude.

I don't have a Pogo Stylus yet but am willing to bet it's a thin metal tube with a tip consisting of a foam-like material that is able to conduct electricity.

It's probably true that the sensing technology in the screen itself is not accurate enough to sense a thin stylus, and it is highly probable that it can't recognize pressure sensitivity.

Seeing how revolutionary the iPad could be for artists, I would hope that Apple and third party developers are already working on a way to get an advanced stylus working via Bluetooth. You may not be able to solve the size problem but the pressure of the pen could be handled via software.

lotusindigo
Apr 6, 2010, 08:33 PM
Steve Jobs has been pretty anti-stylus since the Newton flop, so I wouldn't hold my breath for Apple to provide anything of the sort. Nor would I expect Wacom to step up; that company is notorious for lack of innovation in its products.

Ten One Design (the makers of the Pogo) have already created a desktop app that recognizes capacitive pressure, it's called Inklet. But since Apple won't let developers access raw touchscreen information, a similar app for iPad is impossible for now. It looks like a bluetooth pen is the only hope.

11thIndian
Apr 7, 2010, 09:41 AM
Steve Jobs has been pretty anti-stylus since the Newton flop, so I wouldn't hold my breath for Apple to provide anything of the sort. Nor would I expect Wacom to step up; that company is notorious for lack of innovation in its products.

Ten One Design (the makers of the Pogo) have already created a desktop app that recognizes capacitive pressure, it's called Inklet. But since Apple won't let developers access raw touchscreen information, a similar app for iPad is impossible for now. It looks like a bluetooth pen is the only hope.

I think Job's anti-stylus stance was aimed at primary input, which I'd agree with him on. 95% of the time a finger is accurate enough, and more convenient.

It's pretty clear that if iPad is going to have a life as a Wacom alternative, then a stylus will be needed and Apple is going to have to open up the APIs necessary to make it happen, and I can't imagine any reason they wouldn't. Apple has been slowly opening up the hardware to developers; things were pretty locked down for 2.0, and 3.0 opened things up significantly [Camera, Dock connector]. With the OS 4.0 preview tomorrow, lets hope that they announce some extended Bluetooth and screen APIs to make a more functional stylus a reality.

Xybr
Apr 7, 2010, 09:50 AM
This is as close as you can get to a stylus right now.

http://tenonedesign.com/sketch.php

I got it to draw on my iPhone 3G, but it's probably better on an iPad screen.

lotusindigo
Apr 7, 2010, 10:32 AM
I think Job's anti-stylus stance was aimed at primary input, which I'd agree with him on. 95% of the time a finger is accurate enough, and more convenient.

It's pretty clear that if iPad is going to have a life as a Wacom alternative, then a stylus will be needed and Apple is going to have to open up the APIs necessary to make it happen, and I can't imagine any reason they wouldn't. Apple has been slowly opening up the hardware to developers; things were pretty locked down for 2.0, and 3.0 opened things up significantly [Camera, Dock connector]. With the OS 4.0 preview tomorrow, lets hope that they announce some extended Bluetooth and screen APIs to make a more functional stylus a reality.

Yes, maybe you're right. Here's to hoping they will open up to the creative potential of this device. We'll find out what tomorrow brings.

PCClone
Apr 7, 2010, 10:22 PM
As a graphic designer, I have to say I'm very interested in an App that could work in conjunction with a Stylus type pen for sketching/drawing.

All those working on such a device - keep up the good work. :D Wacom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wacom) included.

The technical issue is I am not an engineer or designer and have no clue how to create a device or write software. Once I get through these issues, I will have a great product that I don't know how to produce or market.

fosters2
Apr 14, 2010, 03:28 PM
My primary interest is for light note-taking and diagrams, rather than drawing. I have the pogo stylus and it works, but a more pointy end would help with writing (my handwriting is bad enough as it is). So, pressure sensitivity for regulating line thickness is not a requirement for me.

I've been using the PadNotes application which is good for a first release.

rtay
Apr 15, 2010, 12:54 PM
My primary interest is for light note-taking and diagrams, rather than drawing. I have the pogo stylus and it works, but a more pointy end would help with writing (my handwriting is bad enough as it is). So, pressure sensitivity for regulating line thickness is not a requirement for me.

I've been using the PadNotes application which is good for a first release.

How long are your notes? i tried to use the sketch for the same thing, but it ended up being a pain because i have to hold my hand over the screen, cant rest it on it, and had to have the stylus touching the screen straight on. all this was using padnotes too. maybe i was doing it wrong, but how are your notes coming out? legible or just really messy?

etmister
Apr 16, 2010, 11:14 AM
I have been using my iPad at work when I am away from my computer which about at least 50% of the time. The Pogo Sketch has been a nice accessory to have to take quick notes. I am finding that there are certain features in apps that work better for note taking with the stylus. The first is the ability to resize the input from the stylus after writing. Since there is not a fine tip to work with you need a larger writing area to get the handwritten text on the iPad. Using an app like SchoolNotes Pro I can write on the screen and then resize it AND move it to where I want. This allows me to have a lot of handwriting and drawings on a single page that are about the size that would normally show up on a paper notebook. The second is a feature that will smooth out the lines like Adobe Ideas does. I took notes in Adobe Ideas at a workshop last weekend and my writing was much clearer than in any other app. The challenge with using Adobe Ideas for note taking is that there is no way to organize more than one page into a notebook which means you are having to deal with an isolated image for each page. The notebook I will ultimately use will have both a feature that smooths out the lines and allows resizing/movement. I find that my poor handwriting looks better when it is smoothed which is an improvement from writing on paper.

I have to disagree with another poster who said that a finger is just as good as a stylus. At least in my experience I have learned from an early age to use an implement like a pen and pencil for writing and not my finger for writing. The speed and accuracy of the stylus vs the finger in my practice on the iPad don't even compare. I would like to see a stylus that has a more refined tip to it, but the Pogo Stylus is good enough with the right app.

I think that Apple could have found a way to be able to support both the finger and a stylus. Since they chose to disregard the stylus some of the more natural applications for this device have to be creatively adapted by others.

barefeats
Apr 18, 2010, 06:37 AM
This is as close as you can get to a stylus right now.

http://tenonedesign.com/sketch.php

I got it to draw on my iPhone 3G, but it's probably better on an iPad screen.

It works great on the iPad. I now carry one in my messenger bag along with the iPad. Another company makes one with a rubber tip but it creates drag when you draw. The Pogo is the best stylus for both iPhone and iPad. I just wish they made a bigger one like a normal pen size for the iPad. Mabye if enough of us email TenOneDesign, they will make one.

Fanatik7
Apr 18, 2010, 09:49 AM
What about these stylus? Are they even out yet? The look way better than the pogo sticks. http://www.ilounge.com/index.php/reviews/entry/ozaki-ifinger-pad-s-l-styluses-for-ipad/

jeff323
Apr 20, 2010, 06:10 PM
Does OS 4 have any of the APIs mentioned in this thread that would allow for pressure sensitivity apps?

silkcom
May 3, 2010, 02:12 PM
My thoughts:

What if you could build a leather case for the ipad with a wacom tablet built in? I'm not sure what the distance is on wacom tablets, but i know that the glass u usually touch isn't the sensor itself. If it could go behind the ipad, then you could use a wacom tablet.

Then the only trick is getting a tablet that either plugs into the bottom of the ipad, or one that uses bluetooth (which would be way better in my opinion).

The last idea is to make it so that the button on the pen turns it on and off (which, for a given each individual app assuming the developer programs it in, would turn finger input on and off). Note - this would probably have to be program per program, but would then enable you to use the pen to write notes, then turn it off, and use ur hand to work (which just removes the need to keep ur palm off the device while writing).

So the input from the wacom would be completely seperate from the finger input. Thus it's not a stylus, but a writing tool for the ipad. And this is just one theory on how it could be possible, dependning on the limitations of wacoms technology.

RockStizzle
May 6, 2010, 03:10 PM
It would seem to me that even on the iPad that if you were using an application on there that you should be able to suggest or select an input size of the marking device. Such as that in photoshop when select diameter size of a brush or something. So as far as the size of the actual stylus for writing and that shouldn't be that big of a deal, now for digital graphics and design yes, but are you really going to be doing that much of it on the iPad?

silkcom
May 6, 2010, 03:13 PM
I think that for the most part they let u if it makes sense, but doesn't need to.

And, almost for sure if you had a pressure sensitive pen on there then people would use it all the time for graphics. Me personally? no i just want something that is as easy to take notes as a pen and paper is. Just offering me "endless" and sortable paper :)

Jkirk3279
May 13, 2010, 07:37 PM
It would be great. Apparently a Bluetooth stylus is possible, but there's nothing on the market yet.



There's a Bluetooth stylus for the iPhone. If it isn't already compatible it won't be long.

silkcom
May 13, 2010, 08:29 PM
can we get a link to it?

dkhenkin
May 13, 2010, 10:56 PM
I don't see how a Bluetooth stylus would solve the issue of having to keep the rest of your hand off the screen unless the app was specially made for it.

richimages
Jun 22, 2010, 09:47 AM
Seems everyone here in this thread might be interested in this post on youTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykD76JXOfgM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=89RcSi1xt0Q&feature=related

I'm loosing some of the details in the translation ... but it seems this is more than just being about separation ... it looks like a "fine" stylus has been achieved. Is he doing this by having an "electro-static" fine tip, next to a finger-like touch?

Anyone figure out how he's doing this?

richimages
Jun 22, 2010, 09:51 AM
i have to hold my hand over the screen, cant rest it on it, and had to have the stylus touching the screen straight on.

here's one solution for hands messing up the screen .... look at the glove this lady is wearing ...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfTeIIi79r8

Zodiak
Jun 22, 2010, 11:51 AM
Looks like Airbrushing really. Very innovative! What I'm really wondering if it would work would be a thin pen with some sort of thermal "lazer" (probably not the right term) that shoots a beam down to the ipad to simulate your finger instead of having something physically there

Like a pen with a lazer sight on the bottom instead of the top.

If there was a lazer that gave off enough heat but not enough to harm the ipad and found a way to fix it to a fake pen with a soft tip, would that not work? I wonder if anyone is willing to strap a lazer sight from a gun to a pen and try it out :D

klio
Jun 22, 2010, 01:04 PM
I'm getting close-to-Cintiq control (well, not super close, I'd still love to have a Cintiq, but very darned close) using a combo of Pogo Sketch stylus, Dagi stylus, and the Art Studio app. With the Pogo, it's useful to wear a glove with thumb and two fingers snipped off, but I can hold my hand in a more relaxed way with the Dagi, so it feels more Wacom-y, and it also has good tactile feedback, like using a real pen. It could be that Art Studio's way of simulating pressure sensitivity happens to mesh well with my way of drawing thin lines (light, fast stroke). That might not work for everyone else.

I hope I'm not repeating too much of what I already said in a different thread... I'm pretty obsessed with using a stylus on the iPad right now, I can't stop talking about. I think I don't need it to get any "better," but I bet I'd change my mind if it got a real Wacom-style stylus--especially with a built-in ERASER function. Now, THAT is what I want, for writing or drawing.

Cagle
Jun 23, 2010, 12:12 AM
With the Pogo, it's useful to wear a glove with thumb and two fingers snipped off....

lol, you're right, you are obsessed.

maybe one day apple will release a pro-version of the ipad, that does have both multi-touch and wacom levels of accuracy with a stylus. it would be awesome to use photoshop on the couch with a stylus.

Fozziebear40
Jun 23, 2010, 04:05 AM
lol, you're right, you are obsessed.

maybe one day apple will release a pro-version of the ipad, that does have both multi-touch and wacom levels of accuracy with a stylus. it would be awesome to use photoshop on the couch with a stylus.

You keep being obsessed and find a solution :) meanwhile you don't have to snip a pair of gloves, you can buy 1 or 2 fingered ones :D

http://eu.shop.wacom.eu/Smudgeguard-Black-M_detail_248_9204.html

Limitless
Dec 4, 2010, 11:51 PM
I was thinking about this earlier now who ever figures this out kudos to them but my idea involved an adapter that would snap on like a case. And the glass being resistive. And communicating iOS through a jailbreak app and it can snap on like a case.

LeoNobilis
Mar 10, 2011, 05:46 PM
Best would be a dual-input, high-resolution, Wacom pen-compatible iPad. Now, provided that the iPad 2 turned out to be a joke, we're left to hope for its succesor to incorporate, along with much more acceptable amount of storage and a much superior screen resolution, a dual-input capacity. I don't expect a progress of that scope from the mommy-granny-baby-oriented snails at Apple, but am hopeful they do sooner rather than later. For if they don't, I hope HP's WebOS-operated devices come to comprise this functionality…

superspiffy
May 4, 2011, 09:28 PM
I've always wanted an iPad to write/draw class notes with but had doubts about it's capability to do that well. Yesterday I caved in and bought one. After a day of trying some of the major note taking apps, I can finally understand the limitations of a capacitive screen with a capacitive stylus. They work good enough... with wrist guard protection and magnification on, but otherwise those apps would be completely useless for me. My wrist would constantly make random marks and the stylus is never fine or accurate enough to write as small as you can on paper.

Somebody needs to make a Bluetooth pressure sensitive stylus now! I can't believe that even this late in the game, nothing remotely like that exist for the iPad yet. Why?

cjoy
Jun 10, 2011, 04:08 PM
Somebody needs to make a Bluetooth pressure sensitive stylus now! I can't believe that even this late in the game, nothing remotely like that exist for the iPad yet. Why?

Because "His Steveness" believes that penanbled devices are dumb and useless. :mad:

Yet, I know a whole bunch of designers that hold out on buying the ipad until Steve enables a decent 3rd party stylus. If he wont, I'll have to wait for the post SJ era with buying an iPad. Adding that functionality seems like a complete no-brainer. What harm would it do?

superspiffy
Jun 10, 2011, 04:38 PM
Would we finally get support for third party bluetooth/pressure sensitive/fine point styluses on iOS 5?

Can any Dev confirm with the new APIs?

APlotdevice
Dec 4, 2011, 12:29 AM
The Cregle iPen appears to be the closest thing to a Wacom so far. Offering perfect palm rejection and a super fine tip, though sadly no pressure sensitivity. It's currently just a Kickstarter.com project, yet already promises support from some major art and note taking apps.

There is also the eFun aPen. This is a remarkably similar product to the iPen. However it currently only works with their own propriatary app.

It's interesting to note that both these pens are based on an earlier pen device which captured notes as you wrote them on paper. Just swapping out the ink cartridge and putting the sensor in an iPad attachment. I say this is interesting because Wacom actually makes a similar product... only their pen does have pressure sensitivity. It is certainly possible that Wacom could similarly adapt theirs to the iPad some point.