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MacRumors
Apr 11, 2010, 09:39 PM
http://www.macrumors.com/images/macrumorsthreadlogo.gif (http://www.macrumors.com/iphone/2010/04/11/distracted-driving-dev-anticipates-iphone-os-4-release/)

Almost as soon as we were ushered into the age of modern driving with the invention of the automobile we entered the age of distracted driving with the inventions of shiny things to keep us distracted: let it be the car radio or more recently the cell phone. Recent research by the National Safety Council (http://www.nsc.org/safety_road/Distracted_Driving/Pages/distracted_driving.aspx) on distracted driving has shown that cell phone usage when driving can cause a driver to miss up to 50% of the information collected in their driving environment, and that hands-free cell phones do not provide any safety benefit when driving. For more, read the NSC's white paper (http://www.nsc.org/safety_road/Distracted_Driving/Documents/Dstrct_Drvng_White_Paper_Fnl(2).pdf) (pdf link).

All of this research as well as public recognition of the problem (did you notice the question by a reporter (http://www.macrumors.com/2010/04/08/apples-iphone-os-4-0-media-event-sneak-peek-into-the-future/) during the Q&A section of last Thursday's iPhone OS Media Event?) has led a number of developers to create technological solutions to the problem. One of the solutions is "izup" by Illume Software (http://www.illumesoftware.com/), currently available for Blackberry, Android and Windows Mobile, with versions under development for quick messaging devices and the iPhone. In an interview with MacRumors, Mark Thirman, Vice President of Business Development for Illume Software, explained the appeal of such applications.

Put yourself in the mindset of a parent or an employer. You really want to reduce the risk for our children or your employees while they're driving.

izup works by detecting when its host device is traveling at a speed greater than 5 mph, then sending incoming calls to voicemail and making only select "white-listed" phone numbers available for out-bound calling. When an emergency number is dialed, a notification can be sent to the account holder (i.e., parent, employer) with the device's location. All SMS texts are also blocked as well as other apps, although there is an app whitelist meant for navigation apps.

With the announcement of iPhone OS 4, Thirman says that an iPhone version of the application is now possible, and that it wouldn't be "just a port". The company is even evaluating whether using iAds would be beneficial to subsidize the cost (currently $4.95 per month for other platforms with volume discounts available).

The iPhone version of izup is scheduled to be released alongside iPhone OS 4 this summer.

Article Link: Distracted Driving Dev Anticipates iPhone OS 4 Release (http://www.macrumors.com/iphone/2010/04/11/distracted-driving-dev-anticipates-iphone-os-4-release/)



Doctor Q
Apr 11, 2010, 09:42 PM
If they decide to go ahead with the iPhone app, and with iAds, wouldn't the ads be another potential distraction to the driver?

I use the ultimate safety system. I always let a passenger have my phone when I'm the driver.

longofest
Apr 11, 2010, 09:44 PM
If they decide to go ahead with the iPhone app, and with iAds, wouldn't the ads be another potential distraction to the driver?

I use the ultimate safety system. I always let a passenger have my phone when I'm the driver.

We could hope that the ads wouldn't display when the app detects when it's driving, but then again, they're just evaluating the idea of using iAds.

vvebsta
Apr 11, 2010, 09:59 PM
well shutting down distractions for when your going faster than 5 miles an hour is great if your constantly driving, but stop and go in traffic or sitting at stoplights aren't going to make it very useful.

Doctor Q
Apr 11, 2010, 10:10 PM
well shutting down distractions for when your going faster than 5 miles an hour is great if your constantly driving, but stop and go in traffic or sitting at stoplights aren't going to make it very useful.
It could have a time delay so you aren't considered idle unless it's been many minutes since you were moving at more than 5mph, as long as the car is still moving at all now and then.

admanimal
Apr 11, 2010, 10:14 PM
I hate to break it to the developers of this app, but what they intend to do is most certainly not possible with any version of iPhone OS, including 4.0. No apps are allowed to control or have any effect on incoming or outgoing calls or txt messages.

milhouse994
Apr 11, 2010, 10:19 PM
What if you're a passenger in the car? On a bus..or a train?

I'm all for reducing driver distraction but this seems like it's a little flawed.

2992
Apr 11, 2010, 10:21 PM
well shutting down distractions for when your going faster than 5 miles an hour is great if your constantly driving, but stop and go in traffic or sitting at stoplights aren't going to make it very useful.
... or ppl can simply switch off or mute their phones. No need for yet another app to make things even more complicated. :rolleyes:

chriszzz
Apr 11, 2010, 10:21 PM
Well this is a great idea except for everyone who rides as a passenger in a car, taxi, bus, train, subway, or plane.

Not everyone moving at > 5 MPH is a driver....

chriszzz
Apr 11, 2010, 10:22 PM
What if you're a passenger in the car? On a bus..or a train?

I'm all for reducing driver distraction but this seems like it's a little flawed.

Haha, exactly what I just said. This idea is very flawed...

crazzyeddie
Apr 11, 2010, 10:26 PM
Interesting. Just read about this app in my Costco Connection magazine. I doubt they will be able to block system-level calls and texts, however.

admanimal
Apr 11, 2010, 11:10 PM
I doubt they will be able to block system-level calls and texts, however.

Pretty much none of the functionality that they describe is possible on the iPhone (even with OS 4). The only way they can "block" the things they claim to block is if they expect you to go through their own address book sort of app to make all of your calls/texts. There is no way for them to do anything with incoming calls or with the native iPhone dialing methods.

Maverick1337
Apr 11, 2010, 11:36 PM
We need those apps that enable the camera so the background of the app is just showing what's in front of you. Now that would cut down a lot of accidents...maybe :D

philbeeney
Apr 12, 2010, 12:22 AM
If they decide to go ahead with the iPhone app, and with iAds, wouldn't the ads be another potential distraction to the driver?

I use the ultimate safety system. I always let a passenger have my phone when I'm the driver.

The assumption there is that you always have a passenger when you're driving. What do you do when you have no passengers?

I leave the phone ringing when I'm driving. Whoever is calling will probably leave a message if it's important or I'll call the number back when I take a pee / smoke break.

spillproof
Apr 12, 2010, 12:52 AM
Why do apps have to teach kids the dos and don'ts of driving. When did the "parents" stop "parenting" their kids. Oh wait, how silly of me, that is the school's job.

Interesting idea. But not quite. Next!

cmaier
Apr 12, 2010, 12:55 AM
Huh? I get that they can run in the background, but how do they intercept the phone stuff?

budselectjr
Apr 12, 2010, 01:09 AM
What if you're a passenger in the car? On a bus..or a train?

I'm all for reducing driver distraction but this seems like it's a little flawed.

Then you turn off the app when your not driving.

Still won't stop stupidity from happening though. Even when your sitting at a stop light you should be just as aware as when your driving.

Doctor Q
Apr 12, 2010, 01:54 AM
The assumption there is that you always have a passenger when you're driving. What do you do when you have no passengers?
In that case I do without the phone, as in the prehistoric days of the 20th century. If I need to make a call, take a call, look something up, or get directions, I pull over and stop first. It's less convenient but like you I prefer safety.

BiggyG
Apr 12, 2010, 04:44 AM
Yeah, what's the phone gonna do when I'm sat on the train, tryiung to use tethering to access my laptop. This is the dumbest idea ever.

At the end of the day, driving whilst using a mobile phone is illegal (at least is is in the UK).

You use your phone - you break the law - you get caught - you get the fine and the points on your licence.

It's the same as speeding, but nobody wants a world where all cars are limited to 70mph.

jayducharme
Apr 12, 2010, 06:22 AM
... or ppl can simply switch off or mute their phones. No need for yet another app to make things even more complicated. :rolleyes:

I always have my iPhone on -- in airplane mode. It's attached to a cradle and acts as my stereo. I agree with others: there's no need for an app when common sense works just fine. Unfortunately, there are lots of people with no common sense....

Runt888
Apr 12, 2010, 06:58 AM
I don't understand how hands-free cell phones don't cause less of a distraction. For me, the most distracting part of taking a call while driving is getting the phone out of my pocket, and holding it to my ear while trying to drive with one hand. In my car, all I have to do when I get an incoming call is to press a button on my steering wheel and start talking. The actual conversation takes very little thought and leaves me able to concentrate on the road.

Excellerator
Apr 12, 2010, 07:17 AM
The only way this would be possible is by jailbreaking your iPhone sorta like iBlacklist does. But I don't see this working anyway.

baryon
Apr 12, 2010, 07:24 AM
Seriously? Hands-free phones do not provide any safety benefit? That means that talking with a person sitting right next to you while driving is exactly as dangerous as talking on the phone with someone through a phone that doesn't require you to do anything but talk.

So having more than 1 seat in a car is as dangerous as having a phone then, since it allows chatty people to sit in the car with you and distract you? Come on!

I don't see why hands-free doesn't provide any safety benefit: the problem with using a phone wile driving is that you can't shift gears since your right hand is holding the phone, and your left hand is holding the steering wheel, and one hand isn't enough to steer a car if you don't have assisted steering. But if you put the phone down, you can shift gears and steer properly, and you have no more problems. I'm sure the human brain is intelligent enough to be able to talk and drive at the same time, that's not the problem folks.

NoNameBrand
Apr 12, 2010, 07:36 AM
Seriously? Hands-free phones do not provide any safety benefit? That means that talking with a person sitting right next to you while driving is exactly as dangerous as talking on the phone with someone through a phone that doesn't require you to do anything but talk.

Talking to people in the car is distracting, and, depending on the study, exactly as or less distracting than talking to someone on the (handsfree) phone. But handsfree and handheld mobiles are found to be pretty much exactly the same in driver impairment.

The Wikipedia article is well sourced if you want to do further reading.
Mobile phones and driving safety (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phones_and_driving_safety)

pmz
Apr 12, 2010, 07:53 AM
This is how this works:

If you want to live, you pay attention while you drive.

If you'd rather die, and possibly kill others, than don't pay attention.


But we are free to choose as we see fit, and we don't need features or restrictions, or legislation, that forcibly change the way we drive.


For some hack developer to make the claims that a handsfree set does nothing to improve driving, is a desperate attempt at hoping he can sell his content that you don't need.

pmz
Apr 12, 2010, 07:55 AM
Talking to people in the car is distracting, and, depending on the study, exactly as or less distracting than talking to someone on the (handsfree) phone. But handsfree and handheld mobiles are found to be pretty much exactly the same in driver impairment.

The Wikipedia article is well sourced if you want to do further reading.
Mobile phones and driving safety (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_phones_and_driving_safety)

Lol, WikiPedia for proof!

camsoft
Apr 12, 2010, 07:56 AM
The company is even evaluating whether using iAds would be beneficial to subsidize the cost (currently $4.95 per month for other platforms with volume discounts available).

So let me get this straight. This app will route phone calls to voicemail and to other numbers while you're driving so that you won't get distracted.

It will then display adverts using iAds. Yeah because that's not distracting at all is it?

longofest
Apr 12, 2010, 08:15 AM
For some hack developer to make the claims that a handsfree set does nothing to improve driving, is a desperate attempt at hoping he can sell his content that you don't need.

Not the developer that's making the claims. It's the National Safety Council. The white paper with all of the supporting research is linked in the article.

It will then display adverts using iAds. Yeah because that's not distracting at all is it?

They are just playing with the idea of doing iAds. No final decision has been made.

room237
Apr 12, 2010, 08:23 AM
This is a much better idea than people learning some safety, responsibility and self-control.

niuniu
Apr 12, 2010, 08:35 AM
I don't actually believe the studies that claim hands free is as dangerous as physically hold and chatting on a phone. The probably focused on some area such as cognitive load while in conversation and applied it to a driving scenario and ignored physical response times.

I know myself, if I'm holding a phone and driving I'm seriously restricted. Response times are terrible, not the case with hands free.

room237
Apr 12, 2010, 08:38 AM
Seriously? Hands-free phones do not provide any safety benefit? That means that talking with a person sitting right next to you while driving is exactly as dangerous as talking on the phone with someone through a phone that doesn't require you to do anything but talk.

So having more than 1 seat in a car is as dangerous as having a phone then, since it allows chatty people to sit in the car with you and distract you? Come on!

I don't see why hands-free doesn't provide any safety benefit: the problem with using a phone wile driving is that you can't shift gears since your right hand is holding the phone, and your left hand is holding the steering wheel, and one hand isn't enough to steer a car if you don't have assisted steering. But if you put the phone down, you can shift gears and steer properly, and you have no more problems. I'm sure the human brain is intelligent enough to be able to talk and drive at the same time, that's not the problem folks.

Talking to anyone while driving is distracting, but it's much less a problem if the person in physically in the car. You are also distracted talking to another person in the car, but they are there too, and they are also paying attention to the road somewhat. They are also paying attention to you and your body language. They can tell when you need to focus or react to something on the road and to stop talking and let you drive. They can say things like "watch out, he's slowing down ahead of you" when they realize you are busy talking to them and not paying full attention. A person you talk to on the phone cannot do any of these things, and will keep talking regardless of what is happening in your vehicle, thus causing a bigger distraction.

The problem with using the phone while driving is not just about having your hands occupied. A large part of your brain is occupied too. The human brain is simply NOT capable of holding a conversation while gathering just as much information about the road ahead compared to when it is 100% focused on driving. That's what the studies are about. Have you ever missed your freeway exit while talking to someone on your hands free? How did that happen?

Queso
Apr 12, 2010, 08:41 AM
Being a biker I simply ignore the phone if it rings whilst I'm riding. However, sometimes someone will attempt to call three or four times in a short period because I'm not picking up. People are ridiculously impatient when they know you're not answering.

kas23
Apr 12, 2010, 09:16 AM
Great idea, horrible execution. This would truly be Big Brother-ish. And this is ignoring the fact that many passengers use their phone while someone else is driving.

In addition, since when do our employers care for us so much? Lol!

Lightbrazer
Apr 12, 2010, 09:16 AM
Seriously? Hands-free phones do not provide any safety benefit? That means that talking with a person sitting right next to you while driving is exactly as dangerous as talking on the phone with someone through a phone that doesn't require you to do anything but talk.

So having more than 1 seat in a car is as dangerous as having a phone then, since it allows chatty people to sit in the car with you and distract you? Come on!

I don't see why hands-free doesn't provide any safety benefit: the problem with using a phone wile driving is that you can't shift gears since your right hand is holding the phone, and your left hand is holding the steering wheel, and one hand isn't enough to steer a car if you don't have assisted steering. But if you put the phone down, you can shift gears and steer properly, and you have no more problems. I'm sure the human brain is intelligent enough to be able to talk and drive at the same time, that's not the problem folks.


Your logic is way off an studies have proven that talking on a hands free headset is not even close to talking to someone who's a passanger in the car. You see when that other car lurches from the right of your car the passanger generally instantly shuts up and reacts to the near collision thus allerting you to it and allowing you to avoid it. But the person on the other end of a hands free conversation doesn't see what's going on around you and happily keeps chatting away keeping you distracted while you crash.

Having a passenger in the car actually reduces accidents because unlike people on the phone they react to what's happening around you. They stop talking at certain pertanent times and even give reactions that assist you. Talking on the phone, hands free or not, is a distraction and has been verified in test after test to cause a decreased ability to drive.

SteveSparks
Apr 12, 2010, 10:01 AM
well shutting down distractions for when your going faster than 5 miles an hour is great if your constantly driving, but stop and go in traffic or sitting at stoplights aren't going to make it very useful.

What happens when you are riding the bus?

AuburnApple
Apr 12, 2010, 10:07 AM
I agree that even handsfree devices provide distraction while driving, but to say they have absolutely no safety benefit reeks of a badly designed scientific study. It doesn't take a scientific study to know that having to reach for a phone and hold it to your ear is MORE dangerous than using a handsfree device. Ever try checking your blindspot or looking both ways with a phone to your ear? Ever tried making evasive maneuvers with only one hand? I have no doubt that talking handsfree is dangerous in certain situations, but if someone tells me it's no safer than talking with a phone to your ear, I haves serious doubts about the basis of their argument; which in this case is ONE NSB study.

Daiden
Apr 12, 2010, 10:11 AM
But we are free to choose as we see fit, and we don't need features or restrictions, or legislation, that forcibly change the way we drive.

We definitely need legislation to change the way we drive. I don't want someone I care about getting killed by a driver who chooses to talk on a cell phone and isn't paying attention. Sure, in a perfect world people should be able to make these common sense decisions on their own, but we live in a world full of idiots. Laws protecting people from other people, and even from themselves, are vitally important to public safety.

DaveGee
Apr 12, 2010, 10:37 AM
Nobody else seems put off by the fact that these developers are charging 4.95 PER MONTH simply to use the software?!?!!?

What exactly would justify that kind of charge? Do they provide some kind of cellular tower technology or satellite telemetry or some other ongoing 'utility' that justifies a ongoing MONTHLY fee? This isn't Cable TV, HBO, Netflix or even Hulu we're talking about... nor is it roadside assistance or alarm system monitoring or any other technology that justifies an ongoing cost... Even on-star which I feel is about as close to highway robbery (lol) as you can get can justify their monthly fee since the cost of keeping a satellite in the sky and or leasing satellite time (or cellular frequency) comes at a cost.

These guys just 'feel like charging it?'...

What next?

Lightbulb companies charging .25 per month for continuing to operate?

Rechargeable batteries charging .50 per 'fill-up' (using your own electricity)

Glasses charging .05 per 8 fluid ounces of liquid put in them?

Maybe I'm missing something and if I am then please ignore this silly rant.. but charging a monthly fee for a standalone item seems all but absurd to me.

Liquorpuki
Apr 12, 2010, 10:40 AM
I spend about 2 1/2 hrs commuting daily through LA Traffic and I find it funny how here in CA, we have a cell phone law that didn't do anything except make people move the headset from their ear about 3 inches down to their mouth and put it on speakerphone.

The fines are negligible, cops don't enforce it enough, most people erroneously think as long as it's on speakerphone it's legal, and more times than I can remember, when someone swerves into my lane, he's palming a phone at his chin and doesn't realize what he just did.

And I use a handsfree Blue Ant speaker when I drive. Besides the fact it's more comfortable, there's a big difference. Those studies that claim handsfree doesn't do anything are limited because they only use one criteria to determine danger and that's your conscious focus. Yet the same loss of focus happens when people listen to the radio, have kids in the car, are daydreaming, etc.

Personally I've noticed that people who cradle a phone while driving are less likely to check their blind spots (probably because it's not comfortable with your phone in the way), which is why I always get swerved on. Couple that with the fact a part of their peripheral vision is blocked by their phone and the hand holding it and they're doing all maneuvers with one hand that's how you get T-Boned.

rjtyork
Apr 12, 2010, 11:01 AM
This is a failed idea... The future is going to involve robots driving our cars, leaving us to be as distracted as we want to be while we wait to get to our destination.

Becordial
Apr 12, 2010, 11:11 AM
This is a much better idea than people learning some safety, responsibility and self-control.


Best post.

There's temptation and risks everywhere on the road and in our lives. All of them involve choices. As long as we have some discipline and respect for ourselves and our fellow motorists there's no need for apps like this.

chuckles:)
Apr 12, 2010, 11:46 AM
Even if it works, the app needs to be open and running. That means if someone doesn't want to use it, then can just SHUT IT OFF. This solution is kind of useless, as it depends on the user as much as the manual method does.

longofest
Apr 12, 2010, 12:20 PM
Nobody else seems put off by the fact that these developers are charging 4.95 PER MONTH simply to use the software?!?!!?

You have some fair points, however some Auto insurance companies give discounts of 3-5% if you can prove that you utilize this technology (Nationwide is one of them). That pretty much pays for the app right there.

Earendil
Apr 12, 2010, 12:22 PM
As always, I take slight issue with these kinds of reports, mainly...

"Recent research by the National Safety Council on distracted driving has shown that cell phone usage when driving can cause a driver to miss up to 50% of the information collected in their driving environment, and that hands-free cell phones do not provide any safety benefit when driving."


The distinction is clear to me as a self aware, self analyzing, serious driver and user of electronic equipment, that devices effect you in at least two major ways:

1. Devices cause you to take your eyes off the road, thus increasing your reaction time by a very large margin.

2. Lower the priority of additional information that might be gathered while driving, which is what this report refers to.

The problem with #2 is that your brain prioritizes the information it receives. While you may not remember all the road details as you are talking on a phone, your brain will certainly recognize a car on a collision course, and raise it to the top of the priority queue. This is why I am happy to talk while driving the open desert, because there isn't any important "extra" information to lose. Conversely, I avoid talking on the cell phone while driving city streets while trying to find a place I've never been to before, because I need as much extra information as I can get in order to find where I'm going. Note that I don't do this to avoid a wreck, I do it so that I can find where I'm going.

And as always, a persons ability to priority track and information track varies person to person by a large degree.

However if you are looking down at your lap because you are texting someone, no amount of reflexes, fast thinking, or good driving will save you from an accident you never see coming.

DaveGee
Apr 12, 2010, 12:35 PM
You have some fair points, however some Auto insurance companies give discounts of 3-5% if you can prove that you utilize this technology (Nationwide is one of them). That pretty much pays for the app right there.

Just because an insurance discount might be awarded.. I still don't see how that in any way shape or form justifies them in charging a monthly fee for a 'one shot' piece of software - especially something as basic as this.

If I get 'etched glass' my insurance company may provide a discount too however the people doing the etched glass aren't charing me a monthly fee. If my car has side-impact airbags I too might see a reduced fee in my insurance but again I'm not paying a monthly fee for them... Same with (most) car alarms... In all cases these are things that insurance may give you special discounts on but none of them keep putting a hand in your wallet on the 1st of every month.

- Live Traffic Info (sure)
- Photo-enabled Traffic Warnings (sure)
- Alternate side of the street parking status (yea okay)

All of those things require a modicum of effort to keep said information up to date (current) so yes a monthly fee is totally understandable and if the people providing those apps/services fall down on the job and their data is often stale then you simply cancel the service.

This is a standalone piece of software and doesn't get any 'backend support / information' that the developer must license or manually update. They are charging a monthly fee 'just because they wanna see if they can get away with it' and that sucks.

It's just about as disgusting as that 'find my family' service AT&T is trying to sell... They are asking people to PAY 14.99 PER MONTH (this is what people pay for HBO) to use a service that by all accounts is available FREE on the internet. Yes with the internet service I believe it ONLY works with iPhones and not 'any phone' and I guess it sure HELPS that APPLE (or is it AT&T) doesn't allow cellular connections to utilize the FREE internet service. Cough **collusion** Cough!

This is another money grab with ALMOST zero maintenance cost. So okay even THIS service which I find priced way too high is still more worthy to charge a monthly fee ... since they do provide (access to) backend services... The fact is those 'location services' are there ANYWAY so AT&T is just charging you a fee to 'peek' at them.

CaryMacGuy
Apr 12, 2010, 01:04 PM
I am totally for this app...I would use it to protect myself from myself. However, I would not want the app to disable phone calls. I use a completely hands free solution in my car and the reason is so I can communicate while underway. I don't feel that I am distracted when talking to someone over handsfree and I feel that if I am in a situation in which I need to end the call, I have enough discipline to hit the end call button on my wheel (or pull off somewhere and finish it if it is pressing).

DaveGee
Apr 12, 2010, 02:30 PM
I am totally for this app...I would use it to protect myself from myself. However, I would not want the app to disable phone calls. I use a completely hands free solution in my car and the reason is so I can communicate while underway. I don't feel that I am distracted when talking to someone over handsfree and I feel that if I am in a situation in which I need to end the call, I have enough discipline to hit the end call button on my wheel (or pull off somewhere and finish it if it is pressing).

Not a problem... for only $6.99 MORE PER MONTH they will let you reactivate specific things that your are paying them $4.99 PER MONTH to deactivate. :eek:

Doctor Q
Apr 12, 2010, 03:00 PM
Here's how I rank the level of danger from distraction, from highest to lowest:
Spider coming down a thread from the visor, right in front of your face.
Holding a phone.
Hands-free call.
Fumbling with an iPod to change your playlist.
Unruly kids in the car.
Listening to my passenger talking by phone to someone I know.
Trying to read a written or printed map.
Focusing on a mounted GPS display.
Listening to a GPS system speak.
Conversation with someone in the car.
Radio/CD/iPod already playing.
We can't legislate #1 and legislating #2 didn't do much good without taking care of #3.

#4 is why iPods ought to be directly connected to the stereo so it's just like a radio station, not something you control separately with the iPod interface.

#5 can be fixed with rope and duct tape; just kidding. :cool:

I know that #6 distracts me; is that just me or does it happen to others too?

Some beginning drivers learn to leave the music off until they've had more driving practice, because even that can be a minor distraction, but we're all pretty much willing to live with the slight risk that we'll tap our foot on the accelerator in time to the music.

Distracted drivers are the reason I no longer ride my bicycle to work; too many near misses with drivers talking on the phone.

DaveGee
Apr 12, 2010, 04:53 PM
Here's how I rank the level of danger from distraction, from highest to lowest:

How's about...

Eating finger foods/one-at-a-time-foods... Fries, chips, etc.
Opening a stick of gum
Eating a meal... Hamburger, 'Jersey Breakfast' (buttered roll), etc, etc.
Listening to 'talk radio/sports show' that might get you riled-up...
Drinking cold beverage
Drinking HOT beverage
Opening/searching a purse
Putting Makeup On
Shaving
Smoking

I'm sure these all rank 'fairly high' in the distracted driving department...

Now what about things you KNOW they'll never even address

Stationary Billboards
Mobile Billboards (all over the streets of NYC) ANNOYING AS HELL!
Distracting / Busy highway store signs / balloons / GORILLAS* / searchlights / etc
Skywriters

Somehow I don't see them going after these distractions anytime soon... :rolleyes:

*I kid you not, a business located on a busy 50+MPH highway had a 'super sale', 'grand opening' or something and had 4 people dressed up in black gorilla costumes and were waving at the cars passing by... trying to get people to notice... result traffic as far as the eye can see and lots of people with pent-up road rage... Uhh, I'd image... :lol:

blybug
Apr 12, 2010, 06:03 PM
Sounds exactly like an option Apple will build into a future iPhone. Reminiscent of the max volume control on iPods. Would be a great feature for SJ to tout on stage, something no other phone has "built in". Simple addition to the Settings panel, what is allowed/disallowed when traveling at driving speeds.

Nice idea izup, but I predict you'll be Soundjammed by :apple:!!

CaryMacGuy
Apr 13, 2010, 08:17 AM
Sounds exactly like an option Apple will build into a future iPhone. Reminiscent of the max volume control on iPods. Would be a great feature for SJ to tout on stage, something no other phone has "built in". Simple addition to the Settings panel, what is allowed/disallowed when traveling at driving speeds.

Nice idea izup, but I predict you'll be Soundjammed by :apple:!!

It would have to be locked by a passcode so some teen couldn't unlock the settings

Doctor Q
Apr 13, 2010, 05:00 PM
It would have to be locked by a passcode so some teen couldn't unlock the settings
Parents would forget the passcode they picked and ask their teen for help, and the teen would be glad to help since he/she had already figured out how to bypass the lockout!

tigress666
Apr 15, 2010, 01:04 AM
Um, wouldn't the people who use this app be the people who wouldn't need this app (the people who already don't want to use the cell when driving and choose not to)?

And the people who this app would be better used on would refuse to put it on their phone anyways (the people who don't think driving and talking on the phone is a problem. Unless you find a way of sneaking it on their phones I fail to see how you'd convince them to put this on their phone unless you could convince them not to use the phone while driving, which, voila, then you no longer need the program for).

I fail to see how this program is really useful for anyone unless you can force some one else to have it on their phone.

CrAkD
Apr 15, 2010, 09:37 PM
wow people need to relax. if your so worried about distracted drivers then put these rules on yourself or dont drive. this is the most ridiculous thing ive ever heard of.

tigress666
Apr 15, 2010, 10:50 PM
wow people need to relax. if your so worried about distracted drivers then put these rules on yourself or dont drive. this is the most ridiculous thing ive ever heard of.

That's kinda my point. The people who feel that driving while talking is dangerous don't need this program cause they won't do it anyways and don't need a program to keep them from doing it.

The people who would need this program don't believe that they need it and would not use it (they think the whole thing is silly). The only way to get them not to do it is to convince them it is bad and therefore they turn into the first people I'm talking about or force them some how (by law or by forcing this app on their phone and making it so they have to use it.. um, yeah, good luck on that).

So therefore I really don't see who would really use this program nevermind actually pay to use it.

jabberjibber
Apr 15, 2010, 11:18 PM
Maybe we should not be allowed to listen to the radio, talk to a passenger in our car, drink a bottled water, smoke ( if you do) touch your C.D.s or even breath for that fact while driving. The app is garbage.. playing it up to the commies... Gimme a break.

tigress666
Apr 16, 2010, 06:24 PM
Maybe we should not be allowed to listen to the radio, talk to a passenger in our car, drink a bottled water, smoke ( if you do) touch your C.D.s or even breath for that fact while driving. The app is garbage.. playing it up to the commies... Gimme a break.

I dunno, the guy I saw on the highway once smoking shouldn't have been allowed to do so.

Cause he decided a great thing to do was light his cigarette by holding hte lighter in one hand that also was holding a newspaper and the steering wheel, and leaning his face towards the lighter...

Driving is not free time that you should find ways to use that time other than focusing on, well, your driving!

Veri
Apr 17, 2010, 06:46 PM
Why is there a whitelist beyond 112/local emergency number? Seems a great thing for employers to be required to install when their employees are discovered by law enforcement using the 'phone for business while driving.

As for people who think they're the exception to the well-studied conclusion that 'phones are distracting: you're welcome to exercise your right to drive in the manner you think is safe on your own private road. Me, I care more about my life than I have faith in your assurance, so if you don't want to put your 'phone down, you can get off our roads.

tigress666
Apr 17, 2010, 07:49 PM
As for people who think they're the exception to the well-studied conclusion that 'phones are distracting: you're welcome to exercise your right to drive in the manner you think is safe on your own private road. Me, I care more about my life than I have faith in your assurance, so if you don't want to put your 'phone down, you can get off our roads.

+1

Honestly, I'm sure there are some people who can do it ok (and I bet they still drive better when they aren't on the phone). But problem is I've seen too many people on the phone who are so clueless they never even caught on that they were driving like an idiot. So in my experience, people don't realize how badly they are driving while they are talking on the phone (they don't even notice the near misses unless some one does something drastic to get their attention). So anyone's word that they can drive just fine while on the phone is quite suspect.

So, no, I don't trust some one when they say they can drive fine while talking on the phone. Problem is people who can't are so oblivious to their driving they don't even realize they aren't driving fine. So, not going to believe you unless I see it with my own eyes.

mrbobbo
Apr 19, 2010, 03:38 PM
How about an app that drives the car: steering, brakes, accelerator, cruise control, camera. Then you never take your eyes OFF of the iphone. No calls, of course, but you'll be playing with your toy so you won't care.

littlewaywelt
Apr 22, 2010, 05:29 PM
Seriously? Hands-free phones do not provide any safety benefit? That means that talking with a person sitting right next to you while driving is exactly as dangerous as talking on the phone with someone through a phone that doesn't require you to do anything but talk.

So having more than 1 seat in a car is as dangerous as having a phone then, since it allows chatty people to sit in the car with you and distract you? Come on!

I don't see why hands-free doesn't provide any safety benefit: the problem with using a phone wile driving is that you can't shift gears since your right hand is holding the phone, and your left hand is holding the steering wheel, and one hand isn't enough to steer a car if you don't have assisted steering. But if you put the phone down, you can shift gears and steer properly, and you have no more problems. I'm sure the human brain is intelligent enough to be able to talk and drive at the same time, that's not the problem folks.

You may not see it, but there are several studies that show that it's true. It's not about a physical distraction, but a mental one. Having a conversation on a phone creates a psychological distraction. There is more of a disconnect, I suspect when you're talking over the phone than engaged in an actual person-to-person conversation. THe last study I saw equated the level of distraction to drunk drivers. The study's conclusion was not negated by any other study.

Earendil
Apr 22, 2010, 05:46 PM
You may not see it, but there are several studies that show that it's true. It's not about a physical distraction, but a mental one. Having a conversation on a phone creates a psychological distraction. There is more of a disconnect, I suspect when you're talking over the phone than engaged in an actual person-to-person conversation. THe last study I saw equated the level of distraction to drunk drivers. The study's conclusion was not negated by any other study.

But you are sidestepping his point, which is that hands-free DOES provide a benefit, and I'm inclined to agree.

Even if you are driving an automatic and have power steering, having two hands on the wheel is far Superior to one. You can not, with one hand, turn equally well in both directions, with the same precision and control. There is a reason that race car drivers use both hands :)

Actually, more than that, go watch an in car video of a race car driver (Either track or rally, as long as they have a stick) and watch them not spend any more time shifting than they have to. They never rest their hand on the gear shifter. It's a real quick release of the wheel, shift, and bam! back to the wheel.

littlewaywelt
May 7, 2010, 05:32 PM
But you are sidestepping his point, which is that hands-free DOES provide a benefit, and I'm inclined to agree.

Even if you are driving an automatic and have power steering, having two hands on the wheel is far Superior to one. You can not, with one hand, turn equally well in both directions, with the same precision and control. There is a reason that race car drivers use both hands :)

Actually, more than that, go watch an in car video of a race car driver (Either track or rally, as long as they have a stick) and watch them not spend any more time shifting than they have to. They never rest their hand on the gear shifter. It's a real quick release of the wheel, shift, and bam! back to the wheel.

I've spent time in SCCA cars and been through several skip barber classes and had track time at lime rock and at summit point; I understand keeping the hands on the wheel. Having a conversation is the distraction with the phone. That distraction is, imho, only slight improved by the loss of the physical distraction of holding a phone. There is a disconnect that's not there when you are speaking to someone in person. Most of the studies acknowledge that it's not about "holding a phone." Even AAA does, if my memory serves correct.

Everyone thinks that they can talk on the phone and it doesn't affect their (or others') safety. Everyone seems to think they're much better drivers and are more acutely aware than they are; they aren't. Most ppl's situational awareness stinks. Add a cellphone and you risk other people's well being.

Unless you're an on call neurosurgeon, or work at the White House or CIA, you're not that important and neither is what you have to discuss. Pull over or wait to make the call.

Earendil
May 7, 2010, 05:49 PM
I've spent time in SCCA cars and been through several skip barber classes and had track time at lime rock and at summit point; I understand keeping the hands on the wheel. Having a conversation is the distraction with the phone. That distraction is, imho, only slight improved by the loss of the physical distraction of holding a phone. There is a disconnect that's not there when you are speaking to someone in person. Most of the studies acknowledge that it's not about "holding a phone." Even AAA does, if my memory serves correct.

Everyone thinks that they can talk on the phone and it doesn't affect their (or others') safety. Everyone seems to think they're much better drivers and are more acutely aware than they are; they aren't. Most ppl's situational awareness stinks. Add a cellphone and you risk other people's well being.

Unless you're an on call neurosurgeon, or work at the White House or CIA, you're not that important and neither is what you have to discuss. Pull over or wait to make the call.

So what you're saying is that you, I, and the first fellow you replied to are all in agreement :)

No one disputes that it's safer to have both hands on the wheel, regardless of conversation, than it is to be distracted AND unable to control your car effectively.

It is not unlike drinking and driving, either with a beer in your hand or with a camel-pack. Neither is safe, but one is safer :)