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View Full Version : Will this lense work on the 450D




GeekOFComedy
Apr 18, 2010, 07:37 AM
I was wondering if this lense would work on the 450D http://www.pixmania.ie/ie/uk/787971/art/sigma/150-500-mm-f5-6-3-dg-apo.html



blockburner28
Apr 18, 2010, 08:37 AM
this is a cheaper price for that lens, but it also says for Nikon cameras, so i'll wait for others to comment on the forum and see if they used it before for a canon.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sigma-150-500mm-f5-6-3-Digital-Cameras/dp/B001542X64

amoda
Apr 18, 2010, 09:14 AM
Yup, it's a canon mount Sigma lens.

Edit:This (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Sigma-150-500mm-f5-6-3-Digital-Cameras/dp/B001542X6E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1271600112&sr=1-1) is the Canon mount version of that lens on Amazon UK.

AlaskaMoose
Apr 18, 2010, 12:36 PM
I was wondering if this lense would work on the 450D http://www.pixmania.ie/ie/uk/787971/art/sigma/150-500-mm-f5-6-3-dg-apo.html

Yes, it's a Sigma lens for Canon.

ComputersaysNo
Apr 18, 2010, 12:45 PM
some reviews here: http://www.fredmiranda.com/reviews/showproduct.php?product=358&sort=7&cat=37&page=1

The aperture starts at F5 which is something you will never consider again after some years of photography*. Sigma is also known for it's bad quality control (front-backfocus problems, soft image etc.)

My opinion is to keep all of your gear the same brand as the camera you use. If that means saving up a little more or buy second hand, so be it.


*F5 is really slow. Your shutterspeeds need to be pretty high to keep your pictures sharp (a minimum shutterspeed of 1/150 at the 150mm end, 1/500 for the 500mm end for non-moving objects!), a rarity when using low iso's . That would mean cranking up the iso which isn't a good thing due to increased noise. Also, the lens does not start to perform at its best at F5, more like F8 or even more. That means even higher shutterspeeds and or iso's.

My bet would be that this lens is usable outdoors on a sunny day. Other than that, don't blame the camera when results are dissapointing ;)

The Mad Kiwi
Apr 18, 2010, 07:55 PM
The aperture starts at F5 which is something you will never consider again after some years of photography*. Sigma is also known for it's bad quality control (front-backfocus problems, soft image etc.)

Or you could think of it as only 1/2 a stop slower the the Canon 100-400mm L, which is to be expected considering it's a longer lens, it's also got OS so you can hand hold it at around 1/125 and still get sharp images of stationary objects, OS and moderately high ISO let this lens be used in most conditions.

I've got the Sigma 120-400mm, a slightly shorter, lighter sister lens to this one, it's a nice lens, focuses well, as sharp as can be expected for a lens with this zoom range. The Canon might be a little sharper especially at the long end, but unless you're printing larger than A3, you'll never notice.

I've also got the Sigma 30mm and 50mm, I've had no problems with quality control or focus, they're nice lenses. There's nothing wrong inherently wrong with third party lenses, some are fantastic, some are crap. It's not like all the lenses Canon make are fantastic, some of them are plain lousy too.

If you can't afford the Canon or like me just don't like the Canon's push pull zoom design of the 100-400 you should be happy with this lens.

HBOC
Apr 18, 2010, 11:05 PM
some reviews here: http://www.fredmiranda.com/reviews/showproduct.php?product=358&sort=7&cat=37&page=1

The aperture starts at F5 which is something you will never consider again after some years of photography*. Sigma is also known for it's bad quality control (front-backfocus problems, soft image etc.)

My opinion is to keep all of your gear the same brand as the camera you use. If that means saving up a little more or buy second hand, so be it.


*F5 is really slow. Your shutterspeeds need to be pretty high to keep your pictures sharp (a minimum shutterspeed of 1/150 at the 150mm end, 1/500 for the 500mm end for non-moving objects!), a rarity when using low iso's . That would mean cranking up the iso which isn't a good thing due to increased noise. Also, the lens does not start to perform at its best at F5, more like F8 or even more. That means even higher shutterspeeds and or iso's.

My bet would be that this lens is usable outdoors on a sunny day. Other than that, don't blame the camera when results are dissapointing ;)

Well, to say that you should keep all your lenses the same is kinda of stupid. I mean if you want to do that, then fine. My sigma 10-20 was better than my Canon 10-22. Canons' lenses vary from copy to copy just as much as other companies. The Tokina 11-16mm is out of stock at most places (has been for a while) and the retail price has gone up at some places? It is a superb lens.

Also, the Bigma is a great lens and value. You DO REALIZE that the price and weight difference between f/5 and a lens that is a few stops faster is like 5x the price? A Canon EF 200 1.8 goes used for $3500. A Canon 800mm f/5.6L IS is $11 GRAND. A Canon 600mm f/4 IS is like $8 GRAND. So considering that, the Bigma is a great value. You aren't going to hand hold it anyways...

Also, with todays' pro level (and even prosumer for that matter) cameras, high ISOs are controlled way better than they were just 5 years ago.

And yes, i know i am comparing primes to the Bigma, but i don't think Canon makes anything in the same Fl as the Sigma.

ComputersaysNo
Apr 19, 2010, 01:07 AM
Well, i never said that Sigma was crap, their quality-control is ;). There are plenty good lenses made by sigma, you just have to be careful and test the lens very well before buying it, That's all.

The reason i use one type of brand for cameragear is that when having problems with one, i don't get the walk-arround when calling customersupport. It's something i have experienced when calling Sigma that the lens was not working. They blame canon (or whatever) of course and visa versa.

Sigma lenses are also reversed engineered, what sometimes means that when you upgrade your camera, your lens needs to be rechipped/reprogrammed. It has happenend in the past that some expensive Sigma lenses refused to work with a newer body. And then you get the walk-around ;)

Using image-stabilisation is only helpful with non-moving objects, and using the length of the zoom as a refference for the shutterspeed does work up to a point, but shooting hand-held with a long lens like that... like i said, don't blame the camera when results are dissapointng :)

edit* some info here: http://photo.net/filters-bags-tripods-accessories-forum/00BJ8y

and i believe you can find hands-on examples of a 450 & 150-500 at www.pixelpeeper.com but i am at work and the network-filter is blocking the word peeper, so i can't check that :P

NightGeometry
Apr 19, 2010, 03:15 PM
and i believe you can find hands-on examples of a 450 & 150-500 at www.pixelpeeper.com but i am at work and the network-filter is blocking the word peeper, so i can't check that :P

I think you probably meant http://www.pixel-peeper.com/ :)