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JamesBerry
Apr 21, 2010, 02:44 AM
Hi

I would like to install Snow Leopard on my Macbook Air Rev A as I have work to do that requires 10.6.x - however I didn't buy the Superdrive so need to do this as a remote install.

I have a PC with a DVD drive and can install the software; I also have the USB ethernet dongle and assume this will be better to use than over Wifi

Has anyone got any hints about doing this? I'm slightly nervous about installing an OS upgrade over a network for some reason... :-)

Best wishes
James



agaskew
Apr 21, 2010, 04:14 AM
I did this on my MBA, which shipped with Leopard plus the Snow Leopard disc.

I connected the MBA plus a source windows laptop with DVD drive, both by ethernet, to the network router. Made sure they were right next to each other so I could easily see what was going on.

It worked but it took hours! Patience is crucial, and the completion estimates are a bit unreliable. (Subsequently I got the Superdrive and did a clean install of SL a heck of a lot faster).

JamesBerry
Apr 21, 2010, 06:55 AM
I haven't installed the Windows tools yet, but did you use the remote install MacOS option and hold down option on reboot, or do something different?

Best wishes
James

PsyD4Me
Apr 21, 2010, 08:25 AM
took forever so i bought a super drive, but not just for that purpose. If i need to you disk warrior or run any other CD i am good to go

JamesBerry
Apr 21, 2010, 05:13 PM
Well good news, it's all done - this is posted from Snow Leopard!

agaskew
Apr 22, 2010, 03:26 AM
nice, now you need to download all the updates!

JamesBerry
Apr 23, 2010, 03:18 AM
Updates came down quite quickly because Apple bundled them up into one file; unlike on Windows where it takes an absolute age ;-)

Scottsdale
Apr 23, 2010, 03:25 PM
Updates came down quite quickly because Apple bundled them up into one file; unlike on Windows where it takes an absolute age ;-)

Actually, you're wrong there. With the Windows platform each component supplier can update there drivers at any time and distribute them through Microsoft/Windows update. In addition, I get much better drivers and updates via Windows 7 on my MBA. Not only that, I get about triple or quadruple the performance from my exact same MBA in Windows than I do in OS X for graphics, HD playback, and most importantly Flash.

We all suffer in OS X because Apple is so secretive with their OS code. It means Apple writes every single driver for every component in every Mac. While it saves money for Apple, and encourages Apple to use few components to write less code. The problem is OS X component drivers are so extremely inferior to drivers available on the Windows platform. The best way to install Windows on a Mac is to avoid the Boot Camp driver package. Use Windows update and actual Windows drivers from the component suppliers to get AMAZING performance boosts over anything Apple provides.

Anyone thinking Apple leads in updates and driver support hasn't looked into the bigger picture. In addition, where Microsoft gets a bad wrap with driver support and crashes, it's the component supplier drivers that often cause problems. When a PC is built with solid components, which all include well written drivers, the PC and Windows can provide an excellent experience. This is all proven PRECISELY on Macs. Apple uses very nice components in Macs. It uses a nice CPU, GPU, chipset, WiFi chip, Bluetooth chip, network adapter, drive controller and etc. Where PCs go wrong, especially with low-end PC suppliers and more importantly whitebox custom configured systems, is one or two cheap components with a few badly written drivers and problems happen.

So there is an advantage to using a Mac, but it's not OS X and Apple's drivers... it's the quality line of all medium grade components. Then using the best drivers with those components and a great user experience is nearly a guarantee. Then the user needs to keep away junk printer apps, junk accessories with terribly written Bluetooth or multi-featured mice drivers. The advantage of using OS X is extremely stable drivers, but the disadvantage there is Apple doesn't truly take anything to the limits. Look at OpenCL drivers, or look at the very few GPUs that Apple allows h.264 hardware acceleration from, now not just the 9400m - Apple now allows 320m and 330 GT to performa h.264. However, it also means the 15/17" MBPs have to run their dedicated graphics to do simple h.264 acceleration.

There are advantages and disadvantages to Apple's Macs and OS X operating systems. If one wants extreme stability and very little performance, the OS X can win. If people want great stability and excellent performance, Windows can win. If people want some stability, decent performance, and cheap components, Windows can win. Everything comes at a cost with Apple's Macs. One, higher cost in terms of money. Two, higher cost in terms of stability taking away from performance. And Windows can offer more performance from less costs, and terrible performance from super low cost.

BittenApple
Apr 23, 2010, 04:03 PM
Actually, you're wrong there. With the Windows platform each component supplier can update there drivers at any time and distribute them through Microsoft/Windows update. In addition, I get much better drivers and updates via Windows 7 on my MBA. Not only that, I get about triple or quadruple the performance from my exact same MBA in Windows than I do in OS X for graphics, HD playback, and most importantly Flash.


I get your point but how is he 'wrong'?

jdechko
Apr 23, 2010, 04:03 PM
Scottsdale,

Of course the flip side to your argument is that the general population look(ed) at Windows itself as unstable and buggy when a driver caused a blue screen. As you stated, this had little to do with Microsoft and much more to do with the vendor, but people placed the blame on MS and looked to them for support.

Not that I'm faulting your thinking, but as you said, Apple likes to control the entire experience from hardware to software and everything in between (such as the drivers). Power users tend to sacrifice some performance at the expense of stability.

Scottsdale
Apr 23, 2010, 05:03 PM
I get your point but how is he 'wrong'?

Maybe you're correct. However, I believe the Windows platform gets out updates and drivers faster. Whenever a vendor updates a driver, it almost instantly goes to Windows update also. I have seen it work that way before.

I wouldn't say Apple updates quickly at all. I remember waiting for 10.6.3 when 10.6 was introduced. There were many problems with 10.6, and 10.6.1 didn't fix many. When Apple introduced 10.6 we lost OpenGL performance by over 25% until 10.6.3 was introduced just a few weeks ago. To me, that's not quick... but it's up to interpretation I suppose.

I definitely wouldn't say Microsoft doesn't update as quickly as Apple, so I guess that's the point where he is wrong... but that's interpretation too. If one says an update isn't until a Windows Service Pack, sure... but Microsoft offers updates much more often than Apple offers 10.6.x updates.

Let's just leave it to interpretation and I will retract my "you're wrong" statement. Not looking for a fight, just don't think Apple gives everyone what they deserve as others do.

We pay a lot of money for our Macs with OS X running on them, and I see the Windows platform as much better for the user running mid to high-grade components. The user benefits more from Windows and the PC than does the OS X user does from the capabilities of the Mac. I offer up the performance of my MBA with Windows 7 and driver updates from vendors or MS as better than Boot Camp and Apple's own driver package gives me in Windows OR OS X. I can watch CPU usage drop by over 75% for some apps and processes in Windows vs. their OS X counterpart. Also the driver performance is much better within Windows... we can look at Intel graphics or basically any graphics in Windows vs. Apple.