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MacBytes
Oct 16, 2004, 03:19 PM
Category: News and Press Releases
Link: MP3 losing steam? (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20041016161956)
Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)

Approved by Mudbug

iMeowbot
Oct 16, 2004, 05:25 PM
That's a weird article. I wonder why they came to the conclusion that people are starting to delete MP3 files more quickly than in the past? The software people use to rip seems to have been ignored. Are more people now using WMP and iTunes where in the past they may have used older programs? That would explain it too, since by default they don't rip to MP3.

wrldwzrd89
Oct 16, 2004, 05:34 PM
That's a weird article. I wonder why they came to the conclusion that people are starting to delete MP3 files more quickly than in the past? The software people use to rip seems to have been ignored. Are more people now using WMP and iTunes where in the past they may have used older programs? That would explain it too, since by default they don't rip to MP3.
Ideally, I'd like my collection to be 100% AAC, but due to quality loss when transcoding from MP3 to AAC, this isn't going to happen unless I can find source WAV or AIFF files to encode myself.

Freg3000
Oct 16, 2004, 06:01 PM
I don't like how AAC is "Apple's." It's not-Apple just uses it like anyone else can. They are just prominent among the people who do use AAC.

nagromme
Oct 16, 2004, 06:02 PM
MP3's nice if you have someplace (maybe your car) with a CD plauer that can play MP3 CDs, and you don't have an iPod. Other than that special case, MP4 (AAC) for me.

CaptainHaddock
Oct 16, 2004, 06:07 PM
Despite what the article says, nearly everyone still uses MP3 and will use it for the foreseeable future. It's the format guaranteed to be unrestricted and to work on every music device and with all music software (even Sony is giving in). The bulk of music available on filesharing networks is in MP3, and all the non-DRM digital music retailers sell MP3.

That said, it would be nice if AAC (aka MP4, a superior format to MP3) became the new standard. Maybe if iTunes used the .mp4 extension instead, it would catch on faster. Ogg Vorbis is completely free and probably the best format from a technical point of view but is slow in gaining support. What else is there really? WMA? Blech! And ATRAC is just a bad joke.

dubbz
Oct 16, 2004, 09:05 PM
I don't like the graph on that site. 19% WMA? I sure hope it doesn't go any further. If MP3 were to be replaced by anything, at least it should be something better... and WMA is not.

I'm personally hoping for Ogg Vorbis, but I don't think there's not enough commercial strength behind it, despite its technical advantages. I don't think it will go away anytime soon, but neither do I think it'll ever reach a major position.

Musepack would be very nice too. Superior quality and very easy to decode (less strain on the Mac/PC, longer battery life for portables). Too bad it's even less popular than Vorbis. It seems close to perfect.. The world's not fair.

AAC should become more popular in time. iTunes being the #1 reason. Winamp encode to AAC by default. Ahead (of Nero Burning Rom-fame) have put much resources into AAC, doing their part on the Windows platform.

Err... well, anyway. I don't see MP3 going away anytime soon.. so, whatever.

wrldwzrd89
Oct 16, 2004, 10:16 PM
Maybe if iTunes used the .mp4 extension instead, it would catch on faster.
Ah, but .mp4 is already taken for MPEG-4 Video.

macnulty
Oct 17, 2004, 08:48 AM
A weird article indeed, I didn't know "iTUNES" is a file format ( see pie chart ). Having said that, if you take the "iTUNES" percentage of 4.3% of the total digital collection as a percentage of the total digital collection that has ben purchased from iTMS, that is an impressive number given the enormous size of the total digital music collection. Consider this: what percentage of the other file formats represented are purchased music.

wrldwzrd89
Oct 17, 2004, 09:36 AM
A weird article indeed, I didn't know "iTUNES" is a file format ( see pie chart ). Having said that, if you take the "iTUNES" percentage of 4.3% of the total digital collection as a percentage of the total digital collection that has ben purchased from iTMS, that is an impressive number given the enormous size of the total digital music collection. Consider this: what percentage of the other file formats represented are purchased music.
iTUNES is just iTunes badly spelled (or "spelt", depending on which variant of English you speak), which in turn is a reference to AAC.