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robinfish
Jun 13, 2010, 11:08 PM
In the light of the recent AT&T security breach, computer repair and support company Rescuecom has come up with five top tips to help you ensure that your iPad is protected. Some of them you’ve probably thought of already, but there might be a couple of gems in there that haven’t occurred to you.

1. Turn off the 3G Network – Although AT&T has said that it’s dealt with the threat, if you’re still a little anxious, turning off 3G temporarily will protect your data from any further attack.

2. Request a new SIM from AT&T – The ICC-ID numbers that the hackers were able to access were attached to each user’s SIM. Changing the SIM will therefore change the ICC-ID as well, and you’ll no longer need to worry about it having been compromised.

3. Confirm any email from Apple or AT&T – Just as on your PC or Mac, “phishing attacks” pose a major threat to your iPad’s security, so if you get an email supposedly from someone at Apple or AT&T, confirm that it actually came from them, and remember that the genuine companies never ask for personal information or login information via email.

4. Change your email address – A bit drastic, but if you’re really worried that your email details have got into the wrong hands, your best bet might be to change your email address.

5. Be careful what you use your iPad for – Again, if you’re really worried about security, Rescuecom suggests avoiding mobile banking or anything that transmits personal information, especially when on a 3G network. Probably not necessary as AT&T says it’s dealt with the threat and beefed up its security, but something to bear in mind just in case.

Source: Rescuecom



j3yq
Jun 13, 2010, 11:11 PM
Thanks for the post, At first I didnt think it was that serious but I guess I'm cleary wrong b

Cinab1mt
Jun 13, 2010, 11:13 PM
+1 Thanks! All great tips and ideas!

Hammie
Jun 13, 2010, 11:42 PM
Actually #1 and #2 won't do you any good. They did not breach the iPad directly, they got into an AT&T website that would auto populate the e-mail address once the correct ICC-ID was generated. Think of war-dialing in the old days (If you're old enough to remember that. :D ). One of the fixes they implemented was the removal of the automatic population of the e-mail address when you go to check your 3G account on your iPad. Now you need to type in both your e-mail address and password.

#3 and #5 should be Internet Common Sense rules.

#4 is drastic but anyone can still get junk mail. There are mail-bots that can generate random e-mail addresses for an ISP's domain. Most ISP's have good spam filters, but if you want to see an interesting thing. Create a gmail account and never use it, but monitor the Spam Mail folder. You will be shocked.

chriszzz
Jun 13, 2010, 11:45 PM
Its pretty clear from those "tips" that this organization has absolutely no knowledge of what actually occurred in the security breach.

robinfish
Jun 13, 2010, 11:58 PM
Actually #1 and #2 won't do you any good. They did not breach the iPad directly, they got into an AT&T website that would auto populate the e-mail address once the correct ICC-ID was generated. Think of war-dialing in the old days (If you're old enough to remember that. :D ). One of the fixes they implemented was the removal of the automatic population of the e-mail address when you go to check your 3G account on your iPad. Now you need to type in both your e-mail address and password.

#3 and #5 should be Internet Common Sense rules.

#4 is drastic but anyone can still get junk mail. There are mail-bots that can generate random e-mail addresses for an ISP's domain. Most ISP's have good spam filters, but if you want to see an interesting thing. Create a gmail account and never use it, but monitor the Spam Mail folder. You will be shocked.


I agree with you. Those may be common sense, but we should thank the persons who summarize the tips.

Hammie
Jun 14, 2010, 12:16 AM
I agree with you. Those may be common sense, but we should thank the persons who summarize the tips.

I guess being in the industry for over 15 years makes these things second nature to me. I forget sometimes that there are naive people who may be oblivious to some of these potential threats/scams/dangers on the Internet.

Aduntu
Jun 14, 2010, 12:53 AM
These "tips" are ridiculous. The only thing you're accomplishing is causing panic and drawing attention to whatever company you're promoting.