PDA

View Full Version : Uncovered: Three Secret Slick Tips For Your Mac. What's You...


MacBytes
Oct 22, 2004, 09:31 AM
Category: Tips and How To\'s
Link: Uncovered: Three Secret Slick Tips For Your Mac. What\'s Yours? (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20041022103137)
Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)

Approved by Mudbug

AmigoMac
Oct 22, 2004, 09:55 AM
Really, wow, I can't believe it ! ;)

Those tips are normally discussed in macrumors.com forums...
Why didn't this guy say how to set exposé to be used on the corners? :rolleyes:

Ok, ok, I know, not everyone is mac savvy...

Benjamin
Oct 22, 2004, 09:59 AM
Honestly... those aren't tips those should be common knowledge. sorry but.. move along ppl nothing to see here.

Sharewaredemon
Oct 22, 2004, 11:09 AM
How about shift scrolling,
this lets you scroll sideways,
although I have seen everything he talked about somewhere, I have never seen anyone talk about shift scrolling.

Very usefull in column view, FCP, and iTunes.

Another one, although I got this off the Apple website, is moving windows that are behind the active one without making them active. Command click the title of the window in the background and drag it around.

edesignuk
Oct 22, 2004, 11:14 AM
Most stuff from mac360.com generally tends to be **** IMO...no change here then :rolleyes:

jchen
Oct 22, 2004, 11:48 AM
About the best $20 or so I've put into OS X has been Scott Kelby's "Mac OS X Killer Tips."

It's just loaded with useful tips that help get things done a bit faster or easier.

One of my favorites is the simple Command-W which closes all open windows of an app. I work where there's a bunch of Macs and almost everyone clicks on each window to close it.

Here's one i figured out on my own but was glad to see it in the book, too: Applications folder in the dock. Then, just click on the folder in the dock and scroll through all the applications without having to open a folder. I bet I show that to five Mac users a week.

mfeldman
Oct 22, 2004, 12:00 PM
Man, that book is loaded with tips. I've used Macs since early days, and OS X since Preview and I still find out things I didn't know.

For example, just found out by using Scott's book that you can drag a file to an application in the dock to open it. While that may not a surprise to the demi-gods, it's not well known.

Why I like it is some PDFs are set to open only with Adobe's Acrobat viewer and I tend to like Preview's extra speed. Now it's just drag to Preview and it opens.

Oh, one more thing. Have you noticed how many Mac users still use the original one-button mouse? And most of those users don't know you can Control-Click to get extra pop-up window. Windows got it right with Right-Click for Properties.

LeeTom
Oct 22, 2004, 12:06 PM
I think Mac360 is pretty lame as well, but I will give you a tip for it (thanks to another macrumors member):

Want to have a choice of several FROM email addresses in Mail without actually setting up a new account for each?

In Mail's preferences, click Accounts, and in the Email Address box, put all your email addresses separated by commas, like:
leetom@place1.net, leetom@place2.net, leetom@yourmomshouse.com

Works great.
Lee Tom

nagromme
Oct 22, 2004, 12:48 PM
Moving along...

Two tips that are SO obvious even Apple forgets them!

When you get a new Mac, do what Apple forgot and improve your display quality massively:

1. Calibrate using System Preferences > Displays.

2. Change the Font Smoothing to "Best for Flat Panel" in Preferences > Appearance (If you have an LCD. And you won't see a change until you log out/in.)

Even Apple's floor models are set wrong.

Want something slightly more obscure?

* Option-drag the Dock divider line to snap to special "sharpest" icon sizes. I drag to the biggest size, and then knowing that's limited by the screen, I back off one.

* Shift-drag the Dock divider to put the dock at any screen edge.

* Command-click a Dock icon to find the file in the Finder.

And a good habit to be in: checking the Trash contents AND emptying the trash without moving your mouse to close the window: Left-click the trash (it opens to show contents) and then right-click (or click-hold or Control-click) to get Empty Trash. The window will auto-close.

edesignuk
Oct 22, 2004, 12:51 PM
Moving along...

Two tips that are SO obvious even Apple forgets them!

When you get a new Mac, do what Apple forgot and improve your display quality massively:

1. Calibrate using System Preferences > Displays.

2. Change the Font Smoothing to "Best for Flat Panel" in Preferences > Appearance (If you have an LCD. And you won't see a change until you log out/in.)

Even Apple's floor models are set wrong.
heh, on the mark! Calibrating my iMac screen made a huge difference, and I couldn't believe it when I saw font smoothing was not pre-set for LCD. What are they thinking!?

Chealion
Oct 22, 2004, 12:57 PM
That one post was nicer then Mac360. Does anyone know why every Mac360 article is being posted on MacBytes?

The site design makes my brain go squish. One of the ads (that keeps popping up for me) is campaigning against the iPod. Why? Because someone can't handle that people enjoy the iPod.

mfeldman
Oct 22, 2004, 01:06 PM
I like the tip from LeeTom about multiple email addresses without multiple accounts. Very handy. I read that article on the iPod, too. It seemed obvious it was done tongue-in-cheek. Duh.

macridah
Oct 22, 2004, 01:10 PM
Not so secret to me ... and that's not cuz I'm a mac veteren. I think my friends that just switched would know those.

some good tips are on macosxhints.com ...

Doctor Q
Oct 22, 2004, 01:41 PM
I'll add my tip. If you start dragging something and change your mind, but aren't sure where it started, drag it to the menu bar and let go. The drag operation will be canceled.

Exception: If you accidentally drag an icon off the dock and don't remember what position it was in, the menu bar trick won't work. Solution: Drop it on the other side of the menu bar (across the divider), in between other icons, and it will return to its original position.

tpatricks
Oct 22, 2004, 01:46 PM
Such dialog over something so unimportant to the elite.

LeeTom's tip is spongeworthy (call me). Lame? An articulate opinion is always respected, though not always with agreement. Are there better sites? Duh. Of course. My favorite news site is MacMinute. Favorite humor site is AtAT. Even MacCentral is better than Mac360? Taken as a compliment, of course. Mac360's been around a few months, MacCentral's been there for ages, has "real" advertisers, a real staff, etc. It must be nice.

Here's the best tip received so far: Apply ColorSync filters to photos in Preview. Obviously, this is more for users who don't have higher-end photo apps. These are built-in to OS X.

Open a photo in Preview (should work in other Cocoa apps). Click File, then select Print. Click on the Copies & Pages in the Print dialog box. Choose ColorSync. Pick a filter. Choose Add Filters from the dialog box. Now you can see selections, make filter changes, see the results before printing. Sweet.

We use Mac OS X for everything. OS X Server for sites. PHP, MySQL, et al. Content management comes from pMachine's Expression Engine, ad serving (no, we don't make money on those) comes from phpAdsNew, polls and surveys from ChumpSoft, contest registration and email lists from ActiveCampaign's 1-2 All system. We make a buck with development and content management, not the web site. That allows us to practice what we preach. Mac360 started as a simple blog using EE, and we just kept adding components to it. It is what it is. It isn't what it will be. It's always (almost) fun.

The real heroes in MacDom? Special kudos to the gazillions of Mac users who keep the faith (quality, ease-of-use) despite the Windows juggernaut. And a nod of appreciation to folks like MacRumors, MacBytes, MacMinute, MacSurfer, AtAT, MacNN, MacUpdate, TMO, OSXHints, and many others who work hard to bring to others what we've learned through the years. As a simple web log, our part may be small, but we do it with sincerity, humility, patience, perseverance, ingenuity, and, sometimes, with a little grace and class. And a few timely pokes at Microsoft and those who may take themselves too seriously (that's why we have just a 'little' grace and class).

Read and enjoy. Or not. Regardless, share what you know with others, however small that contribution may be.

Best wishes, have a great weekend, and aloha.

;)

1MT - yes, the best hints (quantity and value) are usually at MacOSXhints, best humor at AtAT, best news at MacMinute, best controversy at MacDailyNews, best tech at SlashDot, best forums? Duh.

Blue Velvet
Oct 22, 2004, 01:54 PM
My personal fave:

Holding down 'alt' while shutting down, restarting or logging off.

No messing around with 'are you sure' boxes...

srobert
Oct 22, 2004, 01:55 PM
Why I like it is some PDFs are set to open only with Adobe's Acrobat viewer and I tend to like Preview's extra speed. Now it's just drag to Preview and it opens.

You might want to:

A) click on a PDF file.
B) Type "Command-i" (Get Info)
C) Open the "Open with" section
D) In the pull-down menu, select "Preview"
E) Click the "Change All" button.

From now on, all you PDF files will open in Preview.app by default.

I did the opposite as I needed to use Acrobat's more advances features most of the time. (Like forms and stuff)

The 5 single most cool tips that I wish I had learned sooner:
(simple but I did not know)

1) I can spell check system wide, in any Apple App from the edit menu. (very useful when posting here ^_^)

2) I can Zip a file by right-clicking it (or Command-click) and selecting: "Create an archive of:..."

3) I can change the default folder of a new window in the Finder Preferences —>General (simple but I never noticed)

4) I can select text in Safari or text edit, click in the selection and hold until cursor becomes an arrow, drag to desktop to create clippings I want to paste in other apps later.

5) I can right-click a folder or file and —>Copy, go to another folder and right-click —>paste. Like they do in windows. In some situations, it's simpler than drag-and-drop.

mfeldman
Oct 22, 2004, 02:04 PM
How do you set the corners for Expose'? Mine doesn't work at all. I see it at the Apple Store.

:confused:

yellow
Oct 22, 2004, 02:05 PM
Secret Tips? Of the "old hat"?

yellow
Oct 22, 2004, 02:06 PM
How do you set the corners for Expose'? Mine doesn't work at all. I see it at the Apple Store.

System Preferences -> Exposé -> Active Screen Corners..

srobert
Oct 22, 2004, 02:07 PM
How do you set the corners for Expose'? Mine doesn't work at all. I see it at the Apple Store.

:confused:

Very easy

1) Click on the Apple in upper left corner
2) System Preference
3) In the top row, click on Expose
4) In the "Active Screen Corner" area, use the 4 pulldown menus to choose which corner does what.

edit: yellow beated me to it. Fast fella. ;)

Sir_Giggles
Oct 22, 2004, 02:16 PM
is when I launch Safari and want to surf all the Mac sites at once, but without having to click on each bookmark, I use Safari's Open In Tabs feature.

Create a new Bookmarks Bar folder, put all your favourite bookmarks that you want open into it, then choose Open In Tabs. All the bookmarks get loaded at once in their own tabbed windows. After viewing each site, you can close it down by pressing Cmd-W, or clicking the little x's beside the tabs.

srobert
Oct 22, 2004, 02:32 PM
is when I launch Safari and want to surf all the Mac sites at once, but without having to click on each bookmark, I use Safari's Open In Tabs feature.

Nice tip. To bad we can't make it work automatically when we launch safari... or can we?

Mudbug
Oct 22, 2004, 02:41 PM
and this goes for ANY site that gets a submission...

I click pretty much all the links that come in. I'll read the story (albeit not always in their entirety but usually at least 90% or so of it - enough to know if it's fact or crap) and make a judgement call based on a few things:

1) Will it appeal to anyone at all?
2) Is it beneficial or newsworthy in some way?
3) Is it simply an advertisement? (if it's for freeware, it usually gets posted - if for shareware/commercial software, we ask for the purchase of advertising space)
4) Will it stir discussion, debate, or at least a post or two in the forums?
5) Is it new information, or a rehash of someone else's writeup?
6) Has the same relative info been posted already within the last few days?
7) Is it a rumor? (if so, it doesn't go here - it goes to MacRumors)

The majority of the readers of our forums are rather savvy users who are looking to better their experience on a mac, learn about why that experience is all around better than on a PC, answer a few questions they may have about something, get some technical advice on how to do things, or for some - just to read the political stuff. That being said, there is a LARGE group of users and lurkers who don't participate in the forums, and rely on our links to give them new information that may help them somehow.

I've said this before in other threads, and I'll say it again. I don't think that Mac360.com is the bee's knees in mac journalism. I don't think it's a source of super information for mac power users. But that's not what, or who, it's for. It's an infoblog, plain and simple. It does, however, offer something that most blogs don't - decent help to other Mac users. I don't approve every link that comes in - not because I think they've been linked too much already or because I just don't like the article, but because I think the subject matter that it's on won't stir up any discussion here. I'm trying to use this site as a catalyst for discussion about ANY mac-related topics. I think an article asking for your best tips and tricks while pointing out 3 basic ones is a fine idea. If you as a reader would rather have more in-depth articles about a particular subject, start your own infoblog and send me links to what you think are poignant articles that deserve an audience. I'll give it a look.

anyway - if that site bothers you (or any other for that matter), it's not like we're keeping the link to them secret - the name of the site linked is over on the right. If you don't want to read their articles, don't. I won't make you post about them.

<edit> and fwiw - Sir Giggles took my tip - I have tabbed groupings like you guys wouldn't believe.</edit>

Sharewaredemon
Oct 22, 2004, 04:47 PM
One of my favorites is the simple Command-W which closes all open windows of an app. I work where there's a bunch of Macs and almost everyone clicks on each window to close it.

Here is an extension to your command w tip,
command option w closes all open windows ( i think only in whatever app you are in, finder, safari,...)

Also, I really find command option i is usefull too, i just read about this one, it is like show info, except it changes as you select different folders.

musicpyrite
Oct 22, 2004, 05:24 PM
I didn't know about the comman+option+mouse+eject thigy, but I kinda need 3 hands to do it on my iMac. I just push the power button. :D

I also like command+option+control+8, that is black on white. It saves my eye sight when I'm working in a dark room.

mkrishnan
Oct 22, 2004, 05:37 PM
Here's one i figured out on my own but was glad to see it in the book, too: Applications folder in the dock. Then, just click on the folder in the dock and scroll through all the applications without having to open a folder. I bet I show that to five Mac users a week.

Okay, I'm having a brain-dead day. If I try to drag my apps folder to the dock, it refuses to put it there. How do I do it? This sounds like a really good idea -- it would also let me prune a bunch of stuff out of my dock.

jchen
Oct 22, 2004, 05:44 PM
Generally, the left side of the dock (to the left of the vertical line) appears to be for Applications. The right side of the dock appears to be for documents and folders (next to Trash).

Here's what I do: Drag the Applications folder just to the right of the vertical line, but left of the Trash (careful) and drop. Do the same for the Desktop icon. Drag and drop to the dock.

To get really creative, make a folder somewhere handy (Applications, Documents, wherever). Then make an alias for each of those applications and utilities you use most and move them to that folder. Drag the folder to the dock (right of the vertical line).

Now, when you click and hold the folder in the dock, an alias to each of the applications and/or utilities show up.

Sir_Giggles
Oct 22, 2004, 05:52 PM
To get really creative, make a folder somewhere handy (Applications, Documents, wherever). Then make an alias for each of those applications and utilities you use most and move them to that folder. Drag the folder to the dock (right of the vertical line).

Now, when you click and hold the folder in the dock, an alias to each of the applications and/or utilities show up.

You can also expand on this tip by dragging your drive icon from the desktop into the right side of the dock. Control-click or right click on the drive icon in the dock for a hierarchial view of your folders. Its a quick way to traverse your folders without actually having to open them up.

mfeldman
Oct 22, 2004, 05:59 PM
Even with wide screens it doesn't take long for the Dock to get packed with applications, utilities, and documents.

I do most of the above in the right side of the Dock.

Drag the Desktop icon right next to the trash. Now you're a click away from looking at what's on the desktop without going there (Expose REALLY helps this).

Drag the Mac's hard drive icon right next to the trash. One click gets a view of everything from the hard drive level (messier, treat with care).

Drag the username icon (home folder) to the hard drive next to the desktop. Again, one click and everything in the home folder is visible; documents, music, movie, pictures.

Do the same with Applications and Documents.

And I make a custom folder, too. The Dock begins to grow a bit but can be pruned on the Application side, to the left. The Dock isn't my favorite, but works well. It should be one look and click for the applications and utilities you use the most, then simply click and hold and select for everything else.

Easy.

wrldwzrd89
Oct 22, 2004, 06:12 PM
Moving along...

Two tips that are SO obvious even Apple forgets them!

When you get a new Mac, do what Apple forgot and improve your display quality massively:

1. Calibrate using System Preferences > Displays.

2. Change the Font Smoothing to "Best for Flat Panel" in Preferences > Appearance (If you have an LCD. And you won't see a change until you log out/in.)

Even Apple's floor models are set wrong.

Want something slightly more obscure?

* Option-drag the Dock divider line to snap to special "sharpest" icon sizes. I drag to the biggest size, and then knowing that's limited by the screen, I back off one.

* Shift-drag the Dock divider to put the dock at any screen edge.

* Command-click a Dock icon to find the file in the Finder.

And a good habit to be in: checking the Trash contents AND emptying the trash without moving your mouse to close the window: Left-click the trash (it opens to show contents) and then right-click (or click-hold or Control-click) to get Empty Trash. The window will auto-close.
Wow! After calibrating my display, the colors look SO much better. The font smoothing looks a little strange with the tightly spaced bold text on some parts of MacRumors. Other than that, I have no complaints. Great tip!

rikers_mailbox
Oct 22, 2004, 06:13 PM
Personally, I'm crazy addicted to Tabbed browsing. My favs include:
Command-Click - open link in new tab in the background
Shift-Command-Click - open link in new tab
Command-T - opens new empty Tab

I find that closing a Tab and returning to a prevous one is sometimes faster that using the Back button. Eh, to each his own.

Mainyehc
Oct 22, 2004, 06:13 PM
Here's one i figured out on my own but was glad to see it in the book, too: Applications folder in the dock. Then, just click on the folder in the dock and scroll through all the applications without having to open a folder. I bet I show that to five Mac users a week.

Yep, I use that too, but to a whole different level; Maybe it's because I'm a Switcher full of bad habits, but I really missed the Start Menu from Windoze... It's very usable in it's classic W98 version, when properly tweaked, IMHO. So, I decided to recreate it's concept, by "emulating" a "Start Menu" (though I called that folder "Applications" and pasted the Applications' folder icon, I didn't want any negative conotations :p And besides, this is a very clean menu, no weird stuff like "Shut Down" or "Control Panel" or... you get my point :D).

It's fairly easy to do, I created some self-explanatory application groups, "(All Aplications)" sorted by alphabetical order, "Adobe", "Corel", "iLife", "Games", "Macromedia", "Media" (a full assortment of media players), "Microsoft Office X" :eek:, "Utilities" (those general use apps that don't fit anywhere else), "System Utilities", and "Web/Chat/P2P". Then, the only thing I had to do was fill those folders with aliases. Adding to that, there's a very nifty application, "Can Create Icons", which I used to customize those folder's icons. The only awkward thing is that each time I install a new app I have to add an alias to that menu, but other then that, it works and feels preety fine. Just click and hold, ctrl-click or right click (I prefer this one as I have a 2-button mouse :rolleyes: )

edit: I was beaten to it... :o

yellow
Oct 22, 2004, 06:16 PM
Here's a great tip:

Get the most out of your Mac. (http://www.macosxhints.com)

wrldwzrd89
Oct 22, 2004, 06:16 PM
Yep, I use that too, but to a whole different level; Maybe it's because I'm a Switcher full of bad habits, but I really missed the Start Menu from Windoze... It's very usable in it's classic W98 version, when properly tweaked, IMHO. So, I decided to recreate it's concept, by "emulating" a "Start Menu" (though I called that folder "Applications" and pasted the Applications' folder icon, I didn't want any negative conotations :p And besides, this is a very clean menu, no weird stuff like "Shut Down" or "Control Panel" or... you get my point :D).

It's fairly easy to do, I created some self-explanatory application groups, "(All Aplications)" sorted by alphabetical order, "Adobe", "Corel", "iLife", "Games", "Macromedia", "Media" (a full assortment of media players), "Microsoft Office X" :eek:, "Utilities" (those general use apps that don't fit anywhere else), "System Utilities", and "Web/Chat/P2P". Then, the only thing I had to do was fill those folders with aliases. Adding to that, there's a very nifty application, "Can Create Icons", which I used to customize those folder's icons. The only awkward thing is that each time I install a new app I have to add an alias to that menu, but other then that, it works and feels preety fine. Just click and hold, ctrl-click or right click (I prefer this one as I have a 2-button mouse :rolleyes: )
I highly recommend doing this too - it's especially useful if you have several application folders, like I do:
/Applications
/Applications (Mac OS 9)
~/Applications/
...which all get regular use.

spice weasel
Oct 22, 2004, 07:49 PM
Why I like it is some PDFs are set to open only with Adobe's Acrobat viewer and I tend to like Preview's extra speed. Now it's just drag to Preview and it opens.



I apologize if someone already said this, but I'm too lazy to read through the rest of the posts. If you want all your pdf's to open with Preview, simply click on a pdf file, Get Info, then select Preview in the "Open With" menu. Then click "Change All." It will ask you to confirm that you want all .pdf files to open with Preview. Now you can trash that POS, slow as hell Adobe Reader app. Do this will all files you want to open with a specific application.

mkrishnan
Oct 22, 2004, 11:29 PM
Generally, the left side of the dock (to the left of the vertical line) appears to be for Applications. The right side of the dock appears to be for documents and folders (next to Trash).

Thanks! :)

No easy way to get this folder over to the left, then, is there? It'd be a little more intuitive for me somehow over there...*mumbles about start icon and thinks better of it*

But this is definitely tight. :cool:

billyboy
Oct 23, 2004, 07:20 AM
Exposé always gets a wow with Windows users, but often the cynical ones say, "So what?" If you do a lot of emailing of images, expose is the best.

I set up the right corner for F11, (clear the desktop). With Mail open, say I want to attach a file I have download to the desktop, I move the mouse to the right corner so I can quickly see the file, then drag the file to the right corner, which brings everything back into view, and then keep dragging it to Mail, which is obviously the frontmost window. Slick.

Also if you want to drag some text from Safari to say TextEdit, and you have a shedload of windows open, you highlight the text and start to drag it from the Safari window. Then press F9, all the thumnails appear. Keep dragging the Safari text to the textedit thumnail and hold it there for a second or two. Expose brings the Textedit window to the front and voila, ready to drop your text.

Services are good too. Highlight text in Textedit, go to services> Mail> send selection, and an email is auto generated.

redAPPLE
Oct 23, 2004, 11:01 AM
I think Mac360 is pretty lame as well, but I will give you a tip for it (thanks to another macrumors member):

Want to have a choice of several FROM email addresses in Mail without actually setting up a new account for each?

In Mail's preferences, click Accounts, and in the Email Address box, put all your email addresses separated by commas, like:
leetom@place1.net, leetom@place2.net, leetom@yourmomshouse.com

Works great.
Lee Tom

question: so if i set it up like you said, one yahoo address, one gmail, one aol, and then i choose my gmail account, once the recipient clicks reply, would it go to my gmail account?

i might be confused... if i am please elaborate. thx.

tpatricks
Oct 23, 2004, 05:47 PM
This works.

I opened Mail preferences, added a new (fake) email address in the Preferences/Accounts/Email Address field right next to the original and separated by a comma and a space.

myname@myplace.com, fakename@fakemail.com

Then, when I select a New message to be sent, I have a choice of email addresses to use: my original account, or fakename@fakemail.com. However, fakename@fakemail.com uses the same legitimate account settings as the original account, so the mail gets sent OK.

The recipient gets an email message with a From email address of fakename@fakemail.com. If they reply to it, though, it'll bounce back to them. However, if the second, third, etc., email addresses are legit, then they'll work OK when replied to.

Great tip. Very handy for those of us loaded up with email accounts.

I've incorporated the exact same thing in Mac OS X Server for various accounts; one account name can now have multiple email addresses (so long as multiple domains are assigned to the same Server).

Mac OSX and various apps are loaded with little tips like that; many are not documented (like we'd read the documentation if it was two inches thick anyway).

And that's why we SHARE what some may call dumb-assed tips, because they're not such to everyone.

;)

cb911
Oct 25, 2004, 03:17 AM
isn't Tera Partick a porn star? :eek: :confused:

anyways... to get the most out of your Mac, you've got to think like Hansel and Zoolander. :D

"oohhhh.... the files are inside the computer. i've got it now..."

*smashes computer on floor, to get the files out of it*

LOL. :D

redAPPLE
Oct 25, 2004, 05:51 AM
Here is an extension to your command w tip,
command option w closes all open windows ( i think only in whatever app you are in, finder, safari,...)

Also, I really find command option i is usefull too, i just read about this one, it is like show info, except it changes as you select different folders.


this is the same as:

alt + click to close all windows (e.g. you have 6 open finder windows).