PDA

View Full Version : Is handbrake 1080p quality?




eddvedd
Aug 19, 2010, 02:20 AM
Sorry if thats a really stupid question, I'm new to all this. I just picked up an i7 imac and want to rip my DVD's into my library.

I don't know anything about handbrake, so is there a particular setting I should use to rip these DVD's in 1080p, or are the default settings enough? Also, once I get these into my library, would it be possible to stream them to my TV wirelessly (Ill probably pick up iTV when it comes out). Thanks!



SneakerFreak
Aug 19, 2010, 02:45 AM
How can you rip a DVD at 1080p - it is not high-def. You need Blu-Ray for this.

ctakim
Aug 19, 2010, 02:54 AM
Err, DVDs are 480p max quality although they can be unconverted by a DVD player to play through a 1080p TV. But that does not change the resolution of what is on the disk. I think you may be asking if you can rip a DVD losslessly to a hard drive with no loss of quality. You can (most of the time) with a program like Mac the Ripper. Handbrake is used to create compressed video files that can play on Apple devices that can only handle certain levels of video quality such as iPods, iPhones, and the aTV.

eddvedd
Aug 19, 2010, 03:02 AM
Err, DVDs are 480p max quality although they can be unconverted by a DVD player to play through a 1080p TV. But that does not change the resolution of what is on the disk. I think you may be asking if you can rip a DVD losslessly to a hard drive with no loss of quality. You can (most of the time) with a program like Mac the Ripper. Handbrake is used to create compressed video files that can play on Apple devices that can only handle certain levels of video quality such as iPods, iPhones, and the aTV.

Thanks for the reply. That is what I was asking, but it wasn't stated so articulately (I'm not very knowledgeable when it comes to all this)

Patriiick
Aug 19, 2010, 03:11 AM
Since you seem keen on quality, use the "high profile" preset in handbrake, this will give you the best usable quality vs size ratio to use when ripping a dvd.
If you want to display on a HDTV, this setting is a good compromise.