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MacBytes
Dec 4, 2004, 03:06 PM
Category: Opinion/Interviews
Link: Rich Brooks responds: Revenge of the Mac user cultists (and why they missed the point) (http://www.macbytes.com/link.php?sid=20041204160605)
Posted on MacBytes.com (http://www.macbytes.com)

Approved by Mudbug

Nermal
Dec 4, 2004, 03:14 PM
Bring on the flames! :D :eek:

stoid
Dec 4, 2004, 03:16 PM
Well someone certainly missed the point! :D :p

I'm sorry Mr. Brooks, perhaps I'll follow the crowd like a goddamn lemming rather than seeing what is the best and most productive product. :rolleyes: Thank you! I've seen the light! ;)

edit: For the lazy types - original flamed article (http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041127/COLUMNIST09/411270337) and MR discussion thread (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=99464)

winmacguy
Dec 4, 2004, 03:25 PM
Well after I picked myself up off the floor from laughing so hard at his response, I would have to say that Rich Brooks is the one missing the point. He is also stubborn and ingnorant which unfortunatley means his attitude to Apple's operating system and the benefits of using it will never change. These people are best left to live under their rock. It is just unfortunate when they have the power of the press to express their misguided and uninformed views to the larger public, most of whom still believe that all computer operating systems are susceptable to viruses. Interesting to see that he got 700 email replies from Mac users around the world. I guess his article wasnt posted on enough webites...

I seem to remember the guy who trashed his brand new G5 Mac that his parents had given him for Christmas becasue he wanted a Dell since they are "faster" and showed pictures of the rebuild, got more than 700 emails.

I must admit it would be nice if Rich Brooks could actually post some correct and factual information in his replying article after being bombarded by 700 responses. It would seem that he still doesnt know squat about OSX (or care enough about it to do some research)

Pity
Winmacguy

quagmire
Dec 4, 2004, 03:26 PM
He still misses the point of our emails. I wonder who was the one who said that PCs can't read Mac cds. What BS. Now that he says that 97% marketshare was a no brainer for the school district that does sort of make sense so 97% of the kids don't have to learn how to work the Mac. But, still doesn't mean the schools don't have to. I bet you at least 90% of those kids who use windows has an iPod and traveled to an apple store and checked out Macs. My final gripe is the person said," Because Macs have better anti-virus software." A person who says that shouldn't be a Mac Head. Macs don't have viruses because the Mac itself is more secure than windows along with the low market share.

Blackheart
Dec 4, 2004, 03:40 PM
So I'm sure that there WERE a lot of flame emails sent to him and this just makes me mad. Mac users as a whole get a bad wrap when people go out and starting yelling at PC people that they need to switch and that their way of life is wrong. If you're going to send a letter/email out into the PC world, structure it politely. Don't use frivolous generalizations, opinions, or unsubstantiated facts. A common one seems to be "Macs are easier to use". I too believe this, but I wouldn't dare use it in a letter like this. There's no way to back it up with any studies so I wouldn't touch it with a 10 foot pole.

Sorry, just had to rant.

I'll be emailing him apologizing for those flame emails and try to clarify any points that he has missed.

OziMac
Dec 4, 2004, 03:47 PM
I'm sorry, but as much as Brooks missed the point again and quite frankly has no idea what he's writing about, he does have one point - all those people who wrote to him so aggressively simply fueled his ignorance rather than achieving anything positive - I mean, if half of the things he wrote about receiving are true, the authors of that kind of feedback need o be taking a long hard look at themselves before taking the cane to someone else. And look how convinces the great man is. :(

wrldwzrd89
Dec 4, 2004, 03:53 PM
The point Rich Brooks is making doesn't make a whole lot of sense if you take into account that significantly more than 3% of the school population have Macs at home (I'd guess that several of those users have both a Mac and a PC). The marketshare "facts" being quoted are not only themselves false, but they are also misleading given the context.

StarbucksSam
Dec 4, 2004, 03:57 PM
That is UTTERLY unbelieveable.

"Even so, I doubt that I would ever buy a Mac. I've seen what owning one can do to people. And I don't want any part of that."

How IGNORANT. I swear.

Blue Velvet
Dec 4, 2004, 03:59 PM
Revenge is a dish best eaten cold...

After all, the platform of his choice is Windows.
Good luck to him...

nsb3000
Dec 4, 2004, 04:06 PM
The point Rich Brooks is making doesn't make a whole lot of sense if you take into account that significantly more than 3% of the school population have Macs at home (I'd guess that several of those users have both a Mac and a PC). The marketshare "facts" being quoted are not only themselves false, but they are also misleading given the context.

I also liked his defense about writing about Macs even though he has never used one :

"I don't own a Mac or use one; therefore, I shouldn't write about them. The fallacy of this argument is easy to see. Followed to its logical end, this would mean that only murderers could judge those accused of murder, etc."

Right. Because those are two analogues scenarios. Following his type of flawed logic, if 97% people deecied to jump off cliffs, than the rest of us should too...this does not help his aurgument.

The point is you shouldn't write about them because you don't know what you are talking about. I don't personally expect every journalist to use a Mac before writing about them, but they should at least *research* the topic before making broad claims about their benefits and drawbacks, which Mr. Brooks obviously did not do.

Also, there is this part:

"Even so, I doubt that I would ever buy a Mac. I've seen what owning one can do to people. And I don't want any part of that."


I always love it how some people look at Mac user enthusiasm as a negative...as if the Mac operating system is some sort of drug that forces you to believe that it is superior. That these people never consider that Mac users enthusiasm might be a result of a better product, never ceases to amaze me..

NOV
Dec 4, 2004, 05:11 PM
I really 'liked' this part:

No one uses floppy disks anymore. This is flat-out wrong. One teacher wrote to me to say that his students regularly use floppy disks to carry projects and homework to and from school. I know of reporters who do the same thing.

Well I don't in what backward part of the country that teacher and those reporters live
:rolleyes:

AmigoMac
Dec 4, 2004, 05:35 PM
M-O-R-O-N!!!

Yeah, switch to PC and get yourself in troubles...

the man is in the artificial "Win XP Vs Mac os 8" era...

Put the man inside the bag! :mad:

space2go
Dec 4, 2004, 05:43 PM
I still like that one most:
"phasing out the Macs was a no-brainer"

stoid
Dec 4, 2004, 05:46 PM
I still like that one most:
"phasing out the Macs was a no-brainer"

Haha, I finally get the pun. Yes it would take a rather brainless person to phase out Macs for Windows machines. :D

the_mole1314
Dec 4, 2004, 05:48 PM
Phasing out your carrer is a no-brainer.

Iroganai
Dec 4, 2004, 05:59 PM
not with 700 emails, but 700 iMac G5s!

As for floppies etc,
maybe those using Windows are somehow forced to use such an
slow & relatively expensive-per-capacity device even now...

But I think the majorities are now using USB memories,
just CD-Rs, internet storages, or portable HDs including iPods,
or just carrying around your notebooks...


Mmm...

corradokid
Dec 4, 2004, 06:17 PM
Ever since 1998, computers on college campuses I've been to have always had a Zip drive on every computer, be it Mac or PC in their labs. Not just the creative labs, but ALL labs. The PCs had floppies, and about half of the Macs had add-on USB floppy drives but no one used them! Students brought in Zip disks (much more storage) and CD-RWs. Now presentations and such are brought in on pen drives, iPods, CD-R(W)s, and students are welcomed to bring in their own laptops as well.

NO ONE is using floppies anymore. Seriously. Was Mr. Brooks one of those people in '98 trying to say people still need 5.25" floppy disk drives???

He also touched on viruses and spyware attacks, but answering with: Some say this is because Macs have such a small share of the market that hackers don't bother. Others say this is because Macs have superior anti-virus programs. Nowhere does he suggest OS X is just a more secure OS overall and, no, it's not "superior anti-virus programs." If I was to write a paper like this for one of my classes, I'd need to quote sources and do some research. Mr. Brooks would learn probably 90% of MAcs aren't running anti-virus software at all because it's not necessary.

Scary thing is.... the main page of the herald Tribune says "Southwest Florida's Information Leader" HA!

iJon
Dec 4, 2004, 06:31 PM
My high school still used floppies. It was awful. They had nothing else to use. They were also using old equipment. They tended to adopt new techonlogies as they upgraded to newer computers.

I also want to find out his home phone number now, just cause someone got it wrong. No intentions of harrassing him, but it would be fun.

jon

brap
Dec 4, 2004, 07:21 PM
So, anyway.

Responding to e-mails calling you names, you call all Mac users 'cultists'?
Childish, don't you think?

How about you consider how 700 people could have become quite so riled-up, before jumping to the "Mac cult" conclusion. How about you take the reasonable e-mails and READ THEM. Then, perhaps you should spend a few hours researching your case and putting together a balanced article, instead of using your, how did you put it - "no-brainer" logic.

There are always going to be 14-year old kids using the internet. Hell, read the http://www.macteens.com/ forums, and you'll see what I mean. They will reply calling you names; but to dismiss the well-written, mature responses on that basis is... quite frankly, laughable.

I don't know why I'm bothering though; you're getting a hell of a lot of clicks through these two stories and you must be loving it. You proved wth the response your terminally misinformed, closed mind, and inability to take part in rational discussion. So forget it; I'll just continue sacrificing goats.

Enjoy.

--
Benjamin Abbott
University of Kent, Canterbury, England.
Gah! Probably never be read; I'll bet he has a Mail rule in Outlook Express (;))which sends *mac* to the Trash. I know I would If I were a stubborn, closed minded nincompoop expecting lots of Mac-related spam.

Mainyehc
Dec 4, 2004, 07:24 PM
So I'm sure that there WERE a lot of flame emails sent to him and this just makes me mad. Mac users as a whole get a bad wrap when people go out and starting yelling at PC people that they need to switch and that their way of life is wrong. If you're going to send a letter/email out into the PC world, structure it politely. Don't use frivolous generalizations, opinions, or unsubstantiated facts. A common one seems to be "Macs are easier to use". I too believe this, but I wouldn't dare use it in a letter like this. There's no way to back it up with any studies so I wouldn't touch it with a 10 foot pole.

Sorry, just had to rant.

I'll be emailing him apologizing for those flame emails and try to clarify any points that he has missed.

Spot on!

Anyway, I believe in that "Outlook filter" theory. But I think he actually scrubbed through the trash folder, in search of some ugly e-mails, conveniently ignoring information-rich ones. What a dumb-ass... He is the one who seems to be confused... It smells a lot like Stockholm Syndrome! And do you know what I call that attitude of his? DOUBLETHINK!!

jkhanson
Dec 4, 2004, 08:02 PM
I wonder who was the one who said that PCs can't read Mac cds. What BS.

He and the person who wrote him must have been talking about floppy disks. Not that I have actually used a floppy disk in years, but Macs could read PC-formatted floppies but the reverse was not true unless software like MacDrive were installed on the PC.

neonart
Dec 4, 2004, 08:08 PM
In Strongbad's famous words: Unsubscribe me! Take me offalist!

Seriusly folks, if you receive this paper, simply write a polite letter to Mr. Brooks, Mr. Connely, and the subscriptions desk and tell them you would like to NOT receive their newspaper based on Mr. Brooks poorly written article as it shows lack of professional journalism from a newspaper.


But there's probably like 3 people that get that paper anyhow.

bosskxx1
Dec 4, 2004, 08:19 PM
Unfortunately there are more morons out there than just him. These people are old school, and will never listen to reason.

Giving the reason to buy Wintel boxes for the students because it will probably be the system they will use in the work force is bull. Even Windows will change in 5 to 10 years to come that they will have to learn new stuff about the operating system.

I believe that the school systems should offer students Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux. It will make students realize more about computers in general. Knowing only one way to do something on a computer is a very dangerous way of learning, because if something changes in the OS, people wouldn't know what to do.

I remember a long time ago David Progue of CNET was a Mac basher, and wrote an article that received a lot of criticism. Then when he tried a Mac, he later wrote a bunch of positive articles, and even bought one. So my point is I don't even bother reading negative articles about a product unless they thoroughly used the product.

The best thing that people can do is call him a phony, a reporter who writes a persuasive article that is very biased, and no evidence/research to back up his point of view is a bad writer.

dlfitch
Dec 4, 2004, 08:19 PM
My mom has PCs and a Mac in her classroom (4th and 5th grade). The PCs are only used for using World and IE, and absolutely nothing else.

However, the class has digital cameras, a camcorder, a scanner, and tons of multimedia stuff. The kids all refuse to do any of that on the PC, so there ends up being a long line to use the old G3. Having a dock alone changes everything; it encourages kids to launch software and play around with stuff that they would never come across if they had to click a start button and then navigate through the window to find it.

I think those students are much better prepared to use computers in the future, be it a mac or PC. At the same time, the students that can only use PCs and never do that much on them will be able to do just as little on their computers in the future as well. I think PCs are simply too complex for elementary students to use, where as OS X is a perfect introduction into the world of modern operating systems.

Oh yeah, my mom is responsible for all maintenance on the machines too, which she isn't very good at and has no time for, so viruses are a huge pain. In the end they have to wait weeks for the district to send an IT person out (maybe that's only in New Mexico's cash- strapped schools, but I would guess viruses are a huge pain for teachers all over regardless of how may IT people the school has). At least that mac has been there saving them money for almost 4 years now.

Oh yea, his facts are wrong too. Where does a 97% Windows market share come from? Isn't 3% Mac over all, another 3 to 6 percent linux or unix, and windows accounts for the rest? And isn't that including business machines, whereas home users are closer to 10% macs? I think he saw one thing mention a 3% apple market share, assumed that meant home users, and then went on to assume that windows and mac are the only two operating systems out there so MS must have all the rest. What a poor journalists, he should go to a school and try to gather his own information at the very least...

jkhanson
Dec 4, 2004, 08:20 PM
I'm sorry, but as much as Brooks missed the point again and quite frankly has no idea what he's writing about, he does have one point - all those people who wrote to him so aggressively simply fueled his ignorance rather than achieving anything positive - I mean, if half of the things he wrote about receiving are true, the authors of that kind of feedback need o be taking a long hard look at themselves before taking the cane to someone else. And look how convinces the great man is. :(

I agree. Nasty messages don't accomplish anything, however satisfying it may be to send one. If he had instead got 700 messages politely correcting his mistakes, he would get a far different impression of Mac users and his follow-up column might be very different in tone. This is not the first time someone has been so flooded with nasty mail that they write a column about how crazy Mac users are.

Can we (those of us who send messages to columnists) try to represent the Mac user community a little better next time?

goku
Dec 4, 2004, 08:21 PM
[QUOTE=stoid]Well someone certainly missed the point! :D :p

He misses everything. His main issues was when his son was accpted to an honors program before getting any details on the program he bought a PC and when he got detials and a teacher said that the school used Macs. He was upset because had had just assumed that they used PCs.

1. No research on his parts before spending money for his son.

Next is the best nuget

Thinking back to that initial meeting in the high school library, I see now that for all their postulating about technology, the teachers really didn't understand its applications in the educational environment.

Sure, they could write programs, create Web sites and surf the Internet, but they didn't realize that computer technology is a tool to use at home and school.

This last bit argues for the school district need to support Macs as well as PCs. Since one would need to find out what each student had at home before one buys a computer for that student to use.

However if the goal is to teach students about computing and how to use computers they can take the concepts learned in school and apply them at school or work and home.


Now if he wanted to understant Technology in Education he could ask the following.

1. What is the problem we intend to solve with giving the students access to computers?
2. Do students need to learn specific applications like MS Word or general concept such as Word processing?
3. What will the security model be to protect the schools network and prevent hacking.
4. How does the choice of platform affect what the teachers want to do with the students?
5. Does it make sense to have a few diffent choices after all most large companies have a mix Unix, Windows,Linux or just one platform. (Mac break less and are much easier to clone than PC esp Windows XP)
6. What is the end goal.

nsb3000
Dec 4, 2004, 09:57 PM
In Strongbad's famous words: Unsubscribe me! Take me offalist!

Seriusly folks, if you receive this paper, simply write a polite letter to Mr. Brooks, Mr. Connely, and the subscriptions desk and tell them you would like to NOT receive their newspaper based on Mr. Brooks poorly written article as it shows lack of professional journalism from a newspaper.


In defense of the Herald Tribune, they did publish this letter (http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20041203/OPINION/412030617/1029/OPINION02) in Friday's paper in response to Brook's piece:

Columnist Brooks gets an 'F'

In his column on Macintosh computers, Rich Brooks illustrates that he has failed to do his research. Five years ago, he was perhaps correct. But the world has changed in five years; even then perhaps his son stayed after school for reasons known only to a teenager.

After suffering with PCs for years, I purchased a Mac in 2002, about the time Apple introduced a new operating system "OSX." It's easy to use and compatible with Windows, especially the latest XP, etc.

Today, I easily exchange Microsoft Office files with others via the Internet, modifying each other's documents, etc. I prefer Mac's Safari browser, but Explorer works fine also. And the Apple software is great for handling photographs, editing video footage, and easy e-mail.

There are some things a Mac won't do: It won't crash frequently (and can be easily restarted when it rarely does); it won't play a lot of games (not a bad idea for students), and it won't get a virus or worm (none successful for OSX so far).

That leaves cost. I paid a modest premium in 2002. Apple has since reduced prices, and offers special breaks to schools. I confess to not having done current research, but I suspect the Mac premium has shrunk to less than 10 pecent for equivalent machines.

I recommend that Mr. Brooks update his research at new Apple Store in Tampa (International Plaza). I am confident he will find the compatibility issues resolved. Cost/value, operability and convenience he can judge after he brings one home. He will find it addictive -- unless he just wants to play games.

Jerome Schmid

broken_keyboard
Dec 5, 2004, 12:34 AM
Cultists? Cultists live in isolated communities where they are not allowed to see their families and are forced to do and eat what the leader tells them.

That doesn't sound like Mac users. This guy is a right royal twit.

tech4all
Dec 5, 2004, 02:20 AM
Even so, I doubt that I would ever buy a Mac. I've seen what owning one can do to people. And I don't want any part of that.

He seen what a Mac can do to people? Well for me its made me do more work instead of fighting viruses and spyware. Maybe he likes stress :confused: :D That is his opinion, but I just doesn't really make sense to me.....whatever :rolleyes: And, IMO, I really don't appreciate that he keeps refering Mac users as a "cult". Again, although he is entitled his opinion, I still find his article and explanation disrespectful and rude to some degree, again IMO.


My version of that quote:

"Even so, I doubt that I would ever buy a PC. I've seen what owning one can do to people. And I don't want any part of that."

Now that makes sense :)

killmoms
Dec 5, 2004, 07:07 AM
Seriously, all the 14 and 15-year-olds who wrote flames (less on this board, more from the MacNN crowd), go home. People often paint a group of people with a broadly negative brush if their preconceptions are lived out, even if only by a minority.

When the least polite and articulate among us become our spokespeople, this is what happens.

1macker1
Dec 5, 2004, 08:11 AM
No wonder people think Mac users are nut jobs. IF the guy would rather use XP than OS X, so be it. What's the big deal, it's just a computer.

shamino
Dec 5, 2004, 11:34 AM
This guy's a trip.

Buy my PC because everybody else does. I know it's a virus-laden always-crashing piece of garbage, but if everybody else is using it, you aren't allowed to consider anything else.

To heck with getting work done. To heck with quality. Jump on the bandwagon and be a lemming or you're a kook.

And if you disagree with me, I'll write an article and tell the world your mother was the family dog.

dejo
Dec 5, 2004, 01:28 PM
Let's take a look at just one paragraph and see where he went wrong:

The column did not criticize Macs, but pointed out that with 97 percent of the home computer market going to PCs, phasing out the Macs was a no-brainer.

1) "The column did not criticize Macs". C'mon. Really? How does a line like "files and work created on a Mac are not easily transferred to a PC" (from the original article) not criticize Macs (unless he really means to be criticizing PCs, which is hard to believe).

2) "with 97 precent of the home computer market going to PCs". "Going"? Does that mean they're not there yet? If they are, where is his proof that this indeed is the situation? Quote a study or something, please.

3) "phasing out the Macs was a no-brainer". Is this how educators should make all their decisions, especially those that will use taxpayers money? If I was paying taxes into his school board, I would expect decisions that spend my tax money to be based on well-researched information and not just a "because everyone else is doing it" attitude. Also, is this the kind of example of decision-making we want our educators to demonstrate? "Well, kids, you shouldn't be thinking things through. Just do whatever 97% of people are doing and you will be better off." This is not the kind of thinking that school children should be adopting. They are in school to learn to think (far above learning a specific operating system).

solvs
Dec 5, 2004, 08:05 PM
This is classic hack journalism. Write a poorly written, poorly researched article based mostly on unsubstantiated opinion that you know will get you readers... then complain about all of the people who corrected you, being sure to highlight the bad ones and ignoring the valid ones.

Would be funny if he got fired for the shoddy journalism, but that doesn't seem to happen anymore. Money talks, and there's no such thing as bad publicity.

Mav451
Dec 5, 2004, 08:34 PM
It is a cult, sadly, b/c of the zealots. If you wanna talk about percentages, the percentage of Mac users who are zealots are maybe 5-10% (a guess). Unfortunately that outspoken group tends to employ generalizations, personal attacks, among other things in attempting to "convince" PC users to switch.

It is sad that b/c of that outspoken group, that the PC users who are attacked, will respond hostilely and proceed to renounce all Mac users as being zealous. It is unfortunate that the other 90% of Mac users are then, consequently stereotyped and grouped under the same heading as the zealots.

A PC user doesn't want to be told he is a moron for using an "archaic OS" or that his system is "crashing frequently" when that's far from the truth. He does not want to be told that he is a "lemming".

A persuasive argument makes the person think. It is NOT an argument that tells a person WHAT to think. Until the outspoken group understands that, then the "cult" generalization will remain.

bryanc
Dec 5, 2004, 11:24 PM
Ever since 1998, computers on college campuses I've been to have always had a Zip drive on every computer, be it Mac or PC in their labs. Not just the creative labs, but ALL labs...<snippage>....
NO ONE is using floppies anymore. Seriously. Was Mr. Brooks one of those people in '98 trying to say people still need 5.25" floppy disk drives???

Hey 'kid, I still use floppies... and it's a pain in the a$$. But I have to because I use an instrument in the lab (a 96-well fluorescence microplate reader, if you're interested) that's hooked up to an antique Mac that has no network connection, no USB ports, no CD-R, etc. but does have a 3.5" floppy drive (actually, I've always objected to calling those 'floppies'...'floppies' are 8" devices...5 1/4" ers are 'mini-floppies' (I used to punch holes in 'em to get another 128 KB of storage off of the other side), and the 3.5" ers are 'stiffies', but apparently some people objected to all the geeks running around playing with stffies in their pockets).

The point is that this old mac is still running on it's original installation of MacOS 7.5, and still being used on a daily basis, and we're still collecting data with it on it's venerable 3.5" drive. Sadly, I have no floppy drive for my powerbook, so I have to take the data to a slightly-less-old-beige-G3 (running OS 9.1) that has both a 3.5" drive an a network connection to transfer the data to our G5 running OS X.3.6 to actually do anything with it. So floppy disks are still alive and well in the world of bleeding-edge molecular biology research. If it ain't broke...don't fix it.

Cheers

shamino
Dec 6, 2004, 09:20 AM
It is a cult, sadly, b/c of the zealots. If you wanna talk about percentages, the percentage of Mac users who are zealots are maybe 5-10% (a guess). Unfortunately that outspoken group tends to employ generalizations, personal attacks, among other things in attempting to "convince" PC users to switch.
And there are just as many (if not more) zealots for Windows. Just go read comp.sys.mac.advocacy to find just as many pro-Windows flaminig idiots.

Don't let some crackpot reporter con you into thinking Mac users have a monopoly on zealotry.

shamino
Dec 6, 2004, 09:32 AM
Hey 'kid, I still use floppies... and it's a pain in the a$$. But I have to because I use an instrument in the lab (a 96-well fluorescence microplate reader, if you're interested) that's hooked up to an antique Mac that has no network connection, no USB ports, no CD-R, etc. but does have a 3.5" floppy drive
What model antique Mac? Chances are you can give it a network connection with a small amount of shopping.

I have a 10BaseT Ethernet card in my Mac SE. It can mount AppleShare volumes, use LAN-based printers and can talk TCP/IP. All with the software built-in to system 7.

Unless you have a 128 or 512, you can put Ethernet on your Mac. Either as an internal device or as a SCSI device.

For that matter, can you attach your lab equipment directly to your G5? If it needs a serial interface, you can get USB interfaces. If the device is still supported by the manufacturer, then chances are that they have a way to make its software work with modern hardware.
Sadly, I have no floppy drive for my powerbook
Can you get a USB floppy drive for it? They will work for 1.44M diskettes (but not for 800K media.) For that matter, you can put the drive on your G5.
So floppy disks are still alive and well in the world of bleeding-edge molecular biology research.
Unless you've got a very weird setup, a little shopping (possibly for second-hand parts on eBay can eliminate that requirement. And unless you're an unpaid student, the cost savings for your time will far outweigh the cost of the additional hardware.
If it ain't broke...don't fix it.
I guess we have different definitions of "broke". Having to manually shuffle data through two intermediate computers in order to get it from your lab equipment to the computer you want sounds pretty broken to me.

Edot
Dec 6, 2004, 12:32 PM
76% of Americans are Christian! Phasing out other religions is a no-Brainer!!

Mav451
Dec 6, 2004, 04:20 PM
And there are just as many (if not more) zealots for Windows. Just go read comp.sys.mac.advocacy to find just as many pro-Windows flaminig idiots.

Don't let some crackpot reporter con you into thinking Mac users have a monopoly on zealotry.

To clarify, my impressions are from the users on this VERY board, not from the reporter.

I mean, it is inherent, when you are attempting to "switch" people that you will be more vocal and in-your-face, so I mean, its not suprising.

I'm just saying that persuasion that is insulting, degrading, and full of generalizations (I would say a large part of this board when we are discussing PC's), is not gonna have much of an effect.

The few on this board that speak with brevity, clarity, and with genuine facts (not generalizations) are hard to find, but they exist. One of my friend, who is an avid Mac user, is very easy to talk to and never resorts to zealotry when he talks to PC users.

When you speak without an insulting and condescending tone, people will listen.

When you do, how can you expect anyone to listen?