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Old Nov 11, 2010, 05:38 AM   #1
natemac
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Apple Training/Certification Courses

I'm considering Apple networking/security certification and would like to hear about some experiences from people who have taken courses and/or are certified Apple consultants. Which courses did you start with, which were the most helpful, where you began, etc. etc. I'm a 20+ year Mac user but have not considered certified training until now and wanted to hear any feedback and suggestion from others about it.
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Old Nov 11, 2010, 05:57 AM   #2
Queso
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If you're after networking and security Apple is not the company to train with. You'd be better off going for the Cisco certs, such as the CCNP or the new CCNPS (which is replacing the CCSP). Networking technologies are more standardised than endpoint platforms. Once you understand the concepts and protocols and how they relate you can gain knowledge on how endpoints implement them just by reading the OS vendor's support sites.

More details over on Cisco.com
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Old Nov 11, 2010, 09:12 PM   #3
natemac
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Good point - thanks.
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Old Nov 21, 2010, 03:03 PM   #4
dyn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Queso View Post
Networking technologies are more standardised than endpoint platforms. Once you understand the concepts and protocols and how they relate you can gain knowledge on how endpoints implement them just by reading the OS vendor's support sites.
This part completely contradicts the other parts of your post but it is the truth. You really need to start with the basics and work your way up. A lot of vendors have certifications that certify you for their products only. Cisco is such a vendor. They teach you some important stuff but it will be aimed at their products. So if you're working with Juniper equipment it doesn't make sense to get a Cisco certification. It's more helpful to get some Juniper certification instead. Apart from that you don't always need certification. Vendor support sites and other online (and even offline) resources can be enough.

So basically you need to ask yourself why you'd want a certification and then which one.
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Old Nov 21, 2010, 03:17 PM   #5
natemac
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My main interest in Apple/Mac Certification is to fill a need at a friend's IT consulting firm. They do not have an Apple certified technician to deal with setting up networks between PC and Mac, mobile computing support, security involving Macs, etc.
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Old Nov 21, 2010, 09:04 PM   #6
joecool99
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can i take this course online ?

Apple Certified System Administrator (ACSA 10.6)

http://training.apple.com/certification/macosx
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 01:47 PM   #7
logandzwon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by natemac View Post
My main interest in Apple/Mac Certification is to fill a need at a friend's IT consulting firm. They do not have an Apple certified technician to deal with setting up networks between PC and Mac, mobile computing support, security involving Macs, etc.
Certifying would be good for you then. You can self-study with the peachpit books or take the class. Some people do better one way, some the other.
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Old Nov 22, 2010, 03:42 AM   #8
Queso
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Originally Posted by dyn View Post
This part completely contradicts the other parts of your post but it is the truth. You really need to start with the basics and work your way up. A lot of vendors have certifications that certify you for their products only. Cisco is such a vendor. They teach you some important stuff but it will be aimed at their products. So if you're working with Juniper equipment it doesn't make sense to get a Cisco certification. It's more helpful to get some Juniper certification instead. Apart from that you don't always need certification. Vendor support sites and other online (and even offline) resources can be enough.
The encryption and hashing algorithms are pretty standardised regardless of platform, as are most of the implementations of 802.1whatever, STP, LACP, OSPF, BGP etc. The Cisco certs teach you about the protocols, THEN how to implement them on a Cisco platform. Even if you never touch a Cisco device again you will still gain the base knowledge about how networking at the various OSI layers string together, as well as how TCP/IP fits into the OSI model and what you need to do to secure the various protocols within it.

And yes, you can get everything you need for free from the Web if you want. The RFC documents themselves are all publicly there. However, that's not really what I would recommend for someone just starting out, and the OP specifically asked about certs.
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Old Nov 27, 2010, 12:13 PM   #9
dyn
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Originally Posted by Queso View Post
Even if you never touch a Cisco device again you will still gain the base knowledge about how networking at the various OSI layers string together, as well as how TCP/IP fits into the OSI model and what you need to do to secure the various protocols within it.
That's the theory but my experience tells me otherwise. Most Cisco people know little about those common things compared to people who didn't went through Cisco certification stuff. Strangely I keep explaining stuff to Cisco certified people because they don't understand/get it. Cisco's main focus still is their own protocols and their own products but that's the entire purpose of a manufacturers certification anyway They certify that you have knowledge about their products and their standards.

Quote:
And yes, you can get everything you need for free from the Web if you want. The RFC documents themselves are all publicly there. However, that's not really what I would recommend for someone just starting out, and the OP specifically asked about certs.
That's why it is important to learn what certifications are and when you need them. They are certainly not the holy grail, silver bullet, etc. Get some basic education first, then start specialising by getting some certification.
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Old Nov 27, 2010, 01:20 PM   #10
Queso
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Strangely I keep explaining stuff to Cisco certified people because they don't understand/get it.
What level are you dealing with? There's absolutely no way anyone can genuinely obtain the CCNP without having a greater than working knowledge about IPv4/6, BGP, OSPF, 802.1x etc. So either you're encountering CCNAs or complete muppets who are braindumping the exams without doing the work involved.
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