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Old Jan 14, 2013, 06:29 PM   #1
06Honda
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Images Stored on a CD-RW

I have a number of images on a CD-RW from 2008 and some of them only partially load up in preview. They were originally stored and processed from a window based pc but I am not sure if this is the issue. Any ideas, the top half loads fine but the rest of the image won't load, shows solid grey on screen.The images end with .jpg so I am guessing it has nothing to do with being original stored from a pc windows based setup?
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Old Jan 14, 2013, 06:47 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by 06Honda View Post
I have a number of images on a CD-RW from 2008 and some of them only partially load up in preview. They were originally stored and processed from a window based pc but I am not sure if this is the issue. Any ideas, the top half loads fine but the rest of the image won't load, shows solid grey on screen.The images end with .jpg so I am guessing it has nothing to do with being original stored from a pc windows based setup?
Have you actually imported any onto your Mac for this? Or are you reading from the CD? Try importing a few and see if the issue still occurs. There's so many variables here, just trying to narrow it down a bit.
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Old Jan 14, 2013, 07:17 PM   #3
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I have just tried reading using preview from the CD. Will attempt to import into IPhoto and see what happens, thanks.
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Old Jan 19, 2013, 12:08 AM   #4
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I have just tried reading using preview from the CD. Will attempt to import into IPhoto and see what happens, thanks.


Try finding a PC or a friend with a PC. Load the photos there and then email them to you or put them on a flash drive so that you can transfer them to your Mac.


I've always used DVD-R. That's what came with my first Mac. Yeah they used to ship blanks DVD-R with their computers. From what I remember, back then you could only use DVD-R/CD-R. If I tried putting anything else in, it doesn't work. Since I still used my Mac that I bought in 2000, I like using the DVD-Rs. I have some that are over 10yrs old. Sony has work best for me. If you drag your photos to the disc, you should be find. Storing in a dark area of your room helps keep them safe.

idk how CDs have a short life span? I have a few dating back when they first came out Just got to store them properly. In fact the Cds are a little bit thicker and better quality.
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Old Jan 19, 2013, 08:29 AM   #5
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...
idk how CDs have a short life span? I have a few dating back when they first came out Just got to store them properly. In fact the Cds are a little bit thicker and better quality.
The quality of blank CDs has varied over time. And in general I have found that recordable CDs hold out better than recordable DVDs. Individual experiences will differ of course, but I'm reading and hearing much the same from other people.
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Old Jan 19, 2013, 05:44 PM   #6
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Very interesting trend.

Would USB keys be more reliable than CD's , DVD's , etc ?
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Old Jan 14, 2013, 07:23 PM   #7
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First of all, PCs and Macs use the same CD/DVD drives, there is no difference on a technical level. It's just that in my experience CD-Rs and CD-RWs are a very, very bad long-term storage medium. I've had a big collection of CD-Rs (200~300), and at least 30 % of them have had data that has since become unreadable. My advice is to get all data off of CD-Rs and put them onto hard drives. The amount of data that fits on a CD is minuscule by today's standards.
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Old Jan 14, 2013, 08:27 PM   #8
06Honda
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Good advice on the storage options, will get an external device. Finished the import and 114 were good, 140 unreadable.
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Old Jan 16, 2013, 12:51 PM   #9
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According to Computer World, 2-5 years

"Unlike pressed original CDs, burned CDs have a relatively short life span of between two to five years, depending on the quality of the CD,"
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Old Jan 16, 2013, 11:04 PM   #10
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Burned CDs have a short lifespan. It is likely that the dye layer that contain the data has degraded to the point of no return, sorry.
At this point it won't matter if there are scratches or scuffs on the CD; the damage is in the actual reflective stuff sandwiched in the plastic.
Next time, if you plan on archiving with optical media, use DVD. They have higher capacity and longer lifespan (in fact every bit better than CDs except for read rate).
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Old Jan 16, 2013, 11:11 PM   #11
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Next time, if you plan on archiving with optical media, use DVD. They have higher capacity and longer lifespan (in fact every bit better than CDs except for read rate).
In my experience, DVDs don't fare much better. I've had much, much better luck storing data on multiple hard drives. Unlike with physical media, I have yet to lose a single byte of data due to hardware issues.
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 03:54 AM   #12
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In my experience, DVDs don't fare much better. I've had much, much better luck storing data on multiple hard drives. Unlike with physical media, I have yet to lose a single byte of data due to hardware issues.
True, but with hard drives it's lose-one-lose-all. If a single drive crashes and you have your entire archive on it, then you just lost your entire archive. With DVDs you can split the archive up and should one DVD fail, the rest of the archive is safe.
Although I prefer hard drive storage myself too, disc storage is technically much safer in the case that the storage media fails.
To remedy this we have RAID redundant storage to have multiple copies of a single hard drive in case that one of the drives fail. OP should try one of these out
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 05:48 AM   #13
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True, but with hard drives it's lose-one-lose-all.
That's why I wrote multiple hard drives in my post. I don't have one backup drive, I have three plus a Crashplan account. If all of my backups were to fail, I probably have more serious problems than lost data (zombies perhaps? ).
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 06:13 AM   #14
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That's why I wrote multiple hard drives in my post. I don't have one backup drive, I have three plus a Crashplan account. If all of my backups were to fail, I probably have more serious problems than lost data (zombies perhaps? ).
I hear dead hard drives make a good weapon against zombies so you're covered
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Old Jan 30, 2013, 03:45 PM   #15
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There is a lot of discussion on what is the best way to back up media files.
CD, DVD, Blu Ray, Tape, mechanical drive, "thumb" drives, SSD and so on.

The reality is that all of them can fail. CD storage gets a bad rap and deservedly so when one uses inferior discs. Sadly, most on the market discs that are popular by brand are bad choices. There are however (as with DVD) some very good choices. They are designed to be archival by nature.

The short version - CD-R etc. have unstable or low life dyes. Superior media may be produced with long life dyes that can offer far past 30 years. These include stabilized Cyanine, a combination with Azo dye and more.

I highly suggest you (and those unsatisfied with disc media) look at the following link that can explain far better the reality of disc media.

http://adterrasperaspera.com/blog/20...archival-media


This is a good starting point and mentions at least one company that is devoted to archival disc media.

I personally find when storing media, to use both asynchronous redundant drives and disc. The latter is "bulk" files (everything I can store) and the former is for potential return to use files. When I say asynchronous, I am suggesting rather than mirroring drives, use a good duplicating software that allows just the changes to be added to the second drive (including deletions and changes in files). CC Clone and SuperDuper are a couple of easy to use standard choices.

If you opt for mechanical drives, which can store far more than a CD or DVD, just realize if the drive goes bad far more files are lost. Thus, going redundant is important on hard drives.

I hope this helps a bit.
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