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Old Jan 25, 2013, 10:57 AM   #1
macmesser
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mySQL on Abyss installation questions

Setting up Abyss web server with PHP and mySQL on my Mac Pro running 10.6.8 and I have a few questions. I just got "PHP & mySQL in easy steps" by Mike Mcgrath but the setup section is for Windows so it's not too helpful.

I installed the server and Aprellium's PHP 5.4.2 package and have a few questions regarding MySQL version and installation. The recommended version is the free MySQL Community server available at MySQL.com, but I don't know if I should install the 32bit or 64bit version. Any possible issues with either version? Am I correct in thinking that PHP will connect with MySQL directly and the web server will interact with a database only through PHP?

Thanks for insights.
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Old Jan 26, 2013, 06:19 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macmesser View Post
Setting up Abyss web server with PHP and mySQL on my Mac Pro running 10.6.8 and I have a few questions. I just got "PHP & mySQL in easy steps" by Mike Mcgrath but the setup section is for Windows so it's not too helpful.

I installed the server and Aprellium's PHP 5.4.2 package and have a few questions regarding MySQL version and installation. The recommended version is the free MySQL Community server available at MySQL.com, but I don't know if I should install the 32bit or 64bit version. Any possible issues with either version? Am I correct in thinking that PHP will connect with MySQL directly and the web server will interact with a database only through PHP?

Thanks for insights.
Abyss for Mac is not 64 bit as of Abyss 2.8, and you should be fine with the Community 5.1.67 version, be sure to download the DMG for Mac from:
http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/mysql/4.1.html

Once MySQL is running is it available to any program which is designed to connect to it and has the appropriate socket connector or driver. You could use MySQL with Java and Connector/J (JDBC) for example. PHP/MySQL is a popular combo as both are well supported open source coding/DB platforms and easy to learn, but by no means are you limited to this pairing.


If you don't mind me asking:

On your Mac Pro are you running quad-core, 12-core or server?
Do you plan on dedicated your Mac Pro to dedicated commercial web hosting?

I ask because if you only need your Mac Pro to function as a development and staging platform for client projects or personal use, you might consider MAMP Pro simply because it's reliable in such an environment and also far, far easier to maintain and upgrade and configure as it's a suite. There is NO need to go Abyss in such a situation simply because you read somewhere how stable it is compared to MAMP Pro. Each product has its own unique purpose.
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Old Jan 26, 2013, 10:18 AM   #3
macmesser
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SrWebDeveloper View Post
Abyss for Mac is not 64 bit as of Abyss 2.8, and you should be fine with the Community 5.1.67 version, be sure to download the DMG for Mac from:
http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/mysql/4.1.html

Once MySQL is running is it available to any program which is designed to connect to it and has the appropriate socket connector or driver. You could use MySQL with Java and Connector/J (JDBC) for example. PHP/MySQL is a popular combo as both are well supported open source coding/DB platforms and easy to learn, but by no means are you limited to this pairing.


If you don't mind me asking:

On your Mac Pro are you running quad-core, 12-core or server?
Do you plan on dedicated your Mac Pro to dedicated commercial web hosting?

I ask because if you only need your Mac Pro to function as a development and staging platform for client projects or personal use, you might consider MAMP Pro simply because it's reliable in such an environment and also far, far easier to maintain and upgrade and configure as it's a suite. There is NO need to go Abyss in such a situation simply because you read somewhere how stable it is compared to MAMP Pro. Each product has its own unique purpose.
Thanks for reply. The only reason I'm going with this setup (or trying to) is that I want to learn MySQL and not being a Unix guy I thought MySQLWorkbench might be an easy entry, especially since I have the book "PHP & MySQL in easy steps" by Mike McGrath. He specifically works with the Abyss/MySQL/PHP combo in the book but unfortunately the setup sections are for Windows. This will be for my programming self-education, for personal use and to develop and test things for my web site. I have an 8-core 2.93GHz 2009 Mac Pro which I flashed to 5,1 from 4,1 and I'm running 10.6.8.

I know I'm not going to learn Unix overnight so I just want an interface to MySQL which once set up properly I can forget and just tinker with MySQL. I'd like to set it up with PHP and Abyss (both of which I installed) since the book I have uses these together. As the setup section in the book is for Windows I am a bit stymied at an early stage. Eventually I might be using this machine to serve images (plus other non-web uses) but at this point it's for learning and development. I will check MAMP Pro. Is it free like the setup I'm trying to build?


ps - Do you know of a forum dedicated to MySQL, which might have Newbie and Mac threads or groups?

Last edited by macmesser; Jan 26, 2013 at 10:53 AM.
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Old Jan 27, 2013, 09:48 AM   #4
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Learning MySQL from a developer's perspective is one thing, i.e. SQL, connections and queries, but learning how its installed and how the daemon is configured in the OS is another.

If all you need is the former, I must go on the record it's probably in your best interest to use MAMP Pro and avoid the stress of system administration, especially on a Mac when the product you're installing (Abyss) is primarily supported through Windows. But if you enjoy being a system administrator and learning the stack, by all means proceed. You sound committed to Abyss, so you'll need to consult their MySQL/PHP integration/setup guides and support forums beyond this response and the link I provided below.

MAMP PRO is not free, but buying the licensed copy means quick install, easy automated VHOST setup using port 8888 so no interference with Apache already running in most Mac's, easy SSL setup, mailer capability, etc. while being able to easily modify stuff and edit mysql.cnf, php.ini and Apache httpd.conf from wihin the editor, and no need to edit /etc/hosts manually. The unlicensed version is free but less features and more manual editing involved overall. If you're into professional development, buy PRO.

You can always seek help with queries and especially PHP connections to MySQL here, plus mysql.com if you need specific help on functions and more advanced query building. Might also want to install phpMyAdmin at http://www.phpmyadmin.net and learn how to use that, which includes query testing and running, import/export of DB, great way to work with DB's, tables, fields and indexes and so forth. Great way to learn MySQL, totally free. Included in MAMP, both versions.

Links to also help you:
http://www.aprelium.com/forum/viewto...eaf6cb917a4743 (setup abyss, mysql, php)
http://www.mysqltutorial.org/basic-mysql-tutorial.aspx (basic MySQL tutorial)
http://www.w3schools.com/php/php_mysql_intro.asp (W3 schools PHP/MySQL tutorial, excellent)
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Old Jan 27, 2013, 11:40 AM   #5
macmesser
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SrWebDeveloper View Post
Learning MySQL from a developer's perspective is one thing, i.e. SQL, connections and queries, but learning how its installed and how the daemon is configured in the OS is another.

If all you need is the former, I must go on the record it's probably in your best interest to use MAMP Pro and avoid the stress of system administration, especially on a Mac when the product you're installing (Abyss) is primarily supported through Windows. But if you enjoy being a system administrator and learning the stack, by all means proceed. You sound committed to Abyss, so you'll need to consult their MySQL/PHP integration/setup guides and support forums beyond this response and the link I provided below.

MAMP PRO is not free, but buying the licensed copy means quick install, easy automated VHOST setup using port 8888 so no interference with Apache already running in most Mac's, easy SSL setup, mailer capability, etc. while being able to easily modify stuff and edit mysql.cnf, php.ini and Apache httpd.conf from wihin the editor, and no need to edit /etc/hosts manually. The unlicensed version is free but less features and more manual editing involved overall. If you're into professional development, buy PRO.

You can always seek help with queries and especially PHP connections to MySQL here, plus mysql.com if you need specific help on functions and more advanced query building. Might also want to install phpMyAdmin at http://www.phpmyadmin.net and learn how to use that, which includes query testing and running, import/export of DB, great way to work with DB's, tables, fields and indexes and so forth. Great way to learn MySQL, totally free. Included in MAMP, both versions.

Links to also help you:
http://www.aprelium.com/forum/viewto...eaf6cb917a4743 (setup abyss, mysql, php)
http://www.mysqltutorial.org/basic-mysql-tutorial.aspx (basic MySQL tutorial)
http://www.w3schools.com/php/php_mysql_intro.asp (W3 schools PHP/MySQL tutorial, excellent)
Thanks for the links. I'm not committed to Abyss, just thought it might be more out of the box friendly to a newbie. Seems it really isn't. The only thing installation did, for both Aprelium PHP and Abyss, was to copy the application folders into Mac Applications folder. These seem self contained as I found nothing relating to them in any other folder. Since the Abyss forum is locked and seems to be in "read only" mode (which means basically no support for me) I will probably just trash my Abyss and Aprelium PHP folders. I'll most likely uninstall MySQL and MySQLWorkbench as well unless I can make sure they are properly installed (?).

Trying to learn PHP/MySQL with an environment on my Mac seemed like a good idea but it requires more command line chops than I currently have. Maybe I'll try MAMP, maybe I'll get a minimal goDaddy site.
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Old Jan 27, 2013, 01:54 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SrWebDeveloper View Post
Learning MySQL from a developer's perspective is one thing, i.e. SQL, connections and queries, but learning how its installed and how the daemon is configured in the OS is another.

If all you need is the former, I must go on the record it's probably in your best interest to use MAMP Pro and avoid the stress of system administration, especially on a Mac when the product you're installing (Abyss) is primarily supported through Windows. But if you enjoy being a system administrator and learning the stack, by all means proceed. You sound committed to Abyss, so you'll need to consult their MySQL/PHP integration/setup guides and support forums beyond this response and the link I provided below.

MAMP PRO is not free, but buying the licensed copy means quick install, easy automated VHOST setup using port 8888 so no interference with Apache already running in most Mac's, easy SSL setup, mailer capability, etc. while being able to easily modify stuff and edit mysql.cnf, php.ini and Apache httpd.conf from wihin the editor, and no need to edit /etc/hosts manually. The unlicensed version is free but less features and more manual editing involved overall. If you're into professional development, buy PRO.

You can always seek help with queries and especially PHP connections to MySQL here, plus mysql.com if you need specific help on functions and more advanced query building. Might also want to install phpMyAdmin at http://www.phpmyadmin.net and learn how to use that, which includes query testing and running, import/export of DB, great way to work with DB's, tables, fields and indexes and so forth. Great way to learn MySQL, totally free. Included in MAMP, both versions.

Links to also help you:
http://www.aprelium.com/forum/viewto...eaf6cb917a4743 (setup abyss, mysql, php)
http://www.mysqltutorial.org/basic-mysql-tutorial.aspx (basic MySQL tutorial)
http://www.w3schools.com/php/php_mysql_intro.asp (W3 schools PHP/MySQL tutorial, excellent)
+1 for the MAMP recommendation. Also, don't fear the command line in OSX. There are several good tutorials out there.

If your goal is to learn PHP and MySQL, a local dev environment is the best way to go. MAMP is a great option, and if you are feeling a bit more ambitious, this site offers a great tutorial for configuring Apache, PHP and MySQL on your own.

Either way would be a far simpler path than the one you are on or trying to muddle through with a GoDaddy hosting account (you can do a LOT better for hosting when the time comes, too).
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Old Feb 9, 2013, 09:32 AM   #7
macmesser
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grizfan View Post
+1 for the MAMP recommendation. Also, don't fear the command line in OSX. There are several good tutorials out there.

If your goal is to learn PHP and MySQL, a local dev environment is the best way to go. MAMP is a great option, and if you are feeling a bit more ambitious, this site offers a great tutorial for configuring Apache, PHP and MySQL on your own.

Either way would be a far simpler path than the one you are on or trying to muddle through with a GoDaddy hosting account (you can do a LOT better for hosting when the time comes, too).
Thanks for inputs. If I had the time I'd go the Apache route for the local dev environment but might be dicey for me right now. Using the command line seems to require a greater understanding of the Unix philosophy and architecture than I have now (which is not much at all), so that would be the first thing to familiarize myself with. A lot to learn, which is why I'm trying to break things up into self contained units. MAMP might be the way to go for me right now.

I found GoDaddy responsive and helpful with support for their products. They helped me install a certificate and walked me through the whole process. That's the extent of my experience with them but it left me with the impression that they might be the "hosting company for the rest of us," i.e. newbie friendly. When you say there are a lot better options are you thinking price, features, support, reliability? For me support is very high on the list, probably equal to reliability.
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