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Old Nov 4, 2012, 12:02 PM   #51
Phrasikleia
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This is what I was up to on Friday while visiting another topo map location discovery. Autumn is giving way to winter here...

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Old Nov 4, 2012, 01:47 PM   #52
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November is not the best time for photography in these parts. The beautiful Fall foliage is now decaying to mulch, we're post-Halloween, pre-Christmas, without snow and the weather is dreary even at the best of times. The upside to this is that I feel motivated to push myself beyond what I perceive to be my comfort-zone.

This weekend, I spent a wonderful afternoon in a local greenhouse...


Centennial Park Greenhouse by Cheese&Apple on Flickr
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Old Nov 4, 2012, 02:06 PM   #53
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2 hour star trail, if only these stupid planes would stop flying over whenever i try to do this!

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Old Nov 4, 2012, 02:43 PM   #54
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Old Nov 4, 2012, 03:07 PM   #55
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Fall trail in black and white by DigitAl3x, on Flickr

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Old Nov 4, 2012, 04:29 PM   #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phrasikleia View Post
This is what I was up to on Friday while visiting another topo map location discovery. Autumn is giving way to winter here...

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Extraordinary...sea, sky and all points in between...beautiful Phrasikleia. Thank you for sharing this.
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Old Nov 4, 2012, 06:26 PM   #57
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A potential shot for the criteria of rule of thirds in my current assessment. I was really surprised by just how much the background went dark simply by using a long focal length on my 55-250mm lens. For a cheap lens on the cheapest Canon DSLR available, it's not a bad shot I think.

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Old Nov 4, 2012, 06:48 PM   #58
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Thanks

I have to say I really enjoy the composition and technique of the posts from you folks I've quoted below. I look forward to the day that my eye and ability is as good as yours!

Fcortese, AlexH, Cheese&Apple I get inspiration from yours too! I like the more quirky style observations that you guys do quite regularly, than postcard scenes I suppose. That's more in the vein of where I'm headed as a style I guess.

I'm guaranteed to have overlooked some others of you here too, so please don't get miffy if I didn't mention you by name.

This current module of study I'm doing on light and composition is really helping me to get more from my pictures. I suppose, that now I'm looking with more discerning eyes at things, and that's only going to increase as time goes on and I have more technique / skills / knowledge available to me!

As I've just gotten really comfortable with my tripod and the time play that allows, I'm enjoying street light at dusk and just beyond! Architecture that was mundane can really come to life in the right light.

Anyways, what I really want to say is a huge thank you to you all for your odd gems of information that you plant here and more so for the inspiration through analysis of your pictures as to why exactly they work so damn well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phrasikleia View Post
This is what I was up to on Friday while visiting another topo map location discovery. Autumn is giving way to winter here...

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Quote:
Originally Posted by oblomow View Post
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snyder7 View Post
Mine for today...

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This was shot a couple of weeks ago when mother nature was kind enough to allow me a couple of hours of non-rain to go out and play with my new 5DMk2 and 17-40L combo.

This is in Discovery Park in Seattle, by the way
Quote:
Originally Posted by VirtualRain View Post
This is one of my favorites from my recent trip...

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doylem View Post
On the lake yesterday...

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Last edited by ijohn.8.80; Nov 4, 2012 at 08:55 PM. Reason: For clarity
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Old Nov 4, 2012, 07:48 PM   #59
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Fall log by DigitAl3x, on Flickr
As this scrolled up my monitor, I thought, holy cow, a wrecked jet engine ! Made me laugh when I realized how stunned I was ! Nice snap.

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Old Nov 4, 2012, 08:33 PM   #60
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Very nice, snyder7. I like how the clouds sort of frame the top of the lighthouse, and the logs of course make good leading lines. I think I'd like to see less of the grass covering the lighthouse, but perhaps you needed the grass to hide something there?
Hey Phrasikleia,

I indeed was hiding a fence behind the tall grass. However, I did set up my composition that way because I was very attracted to the movement on the grasses due to high wind and so the composition was 80% determined by capturing those grass bushes rather than hiding the fence.

Thank you for commenting though!
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Old Nov 5, 2012, 01:23 AM   #61
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Old Nov 5, 2012, 04:37 AM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheese&Apple View Post
Extraordinary...sea, sky and all points in between...beautiful Phrasikleia. Thank you for sharing this.
Thanks for the comment, Cheese&Apple. That lake was almost too much fun for me. After I took that shot, I had a lot of trouble concentrating on subsequent compositions because I was too distracted by the whole experience of being there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BarryJ View Post
As this scrolled up my monitor, I thought, holy cow, a wrecked jet engine ! Made me laugh when I realized how stunned I was ! Nice snap.

BJ
I thought the same exact thing and almost commented about it myself!

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Originally Posted by snyder7 View Post
Hey Phrasikleia,

I indeed was hiding a fence behind the tall grass. However, I did set up my composition that way because I was very attracted to the movement on the grasses due to high wind and so the composition was 80% determined by capturing those grass bushes rather than hiding the fence.

Thank you for commenting though!
I really like the color and texture of the grass, so I totally understand your motivation. I was just curious why you chose the overlapping alignment between the grass and the lighthouse. Anyway, it looks like a beautiful location. I'd love to get up that way someday.

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Originally Posted by oblomow View Post
Good job on catching the mist and sun rays--not easy to do! Have you considered a crop that might get us in closer to that atmospheric goodness in the background? Just a thought!
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Old Nov 5, 2012, 05:19 AM   #63
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Quote:
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I've loved every shot you've taken of this beautiful hill. If I ever make it up to that region, I hope you'll tell me where it is! I would love to photograph it myself someday.
Thanks. To be honest, I'm having trouble getting to the remoter places that I love best, so I'm mostly having to stay local. But instead of fretting about the places I can't get to, I'm enjoying the experience of finding pictures closer to home... where the landscape is intimate rather than dramatic. If you come over here, I'll be happy to show you some wonderful places. Of course, it will probably be raining...

Quote:
Originally Posted by ijohn.8.80 View Post
This current module of study I'm doing on light and composition is really helping me to get more from my pictures. I suppose, that now I'm looking with more discerning eyes at things, and that's only going to increase as time goes on and I have more technique / skills / knowledge available to me!
That sounds like a good approach, IMO. Light is the alpha and omega of photography... potentially a fascination that will last a lifetime. It opens doors to new ways of seeing, unlike the reliance on 'tech solutions' and reaching automatically for some 'effect'...

The lake at Waterhead...

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Old Nov 5, 2012, 06:08 AM   #64
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Quote:
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That sounds like a good approach, IMO. Light is the alpha and omega of photography... potentially a fascination that will last a lifetime. It opens doors to new ways of seeing, unlike the reliance on 'tech solutions' and reaching automatically for some 'effect'...
Speaking of understanding and working (or playing) with light pre-camera, as has become my new mantra! What are your thoughts on light meters? I just ordered the Sekonic L-358, with the intention of getting the 1 degree spot sensor for it a bit later on to spot meter distant shots.

I'm trying to get to a point where I don't have to do much with Lightroom or Photoshop to any pictures as the real work has been done before even pressing the trigger. This I'd say is the secret to the great works of those I mentioned (and those I forgot to mention) in the previous post and from the documentaries I've been watching it appears is definitely the secret of the old masters!
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Old Nov 5, 2012, 06:48 AM   #65
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I got a new computer and now with this monitor all of my photos look funny. Dang.


Inca Trail, Peru by Melissa.O.Anderson, on Flickr
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Old Nov 5, 2012, 07:00 AM   #66
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Laughing mid picture.

As always comments appreciated!


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Old Nov 5, 2012, 07:19 AM   #67
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Fire!



Cropped Photo from a bonfire I recently visited. I'm finding fire to be VERY fun to photograph.

I used a Canon EOS 300D with it's stock 35-80mm lens. Unfortunately I can't remember the other details. I just cranked it down a couple steps and gave it a slowish shutter speed.

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Old Nov 5, 2012, 07:51 AM   #68
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Originally Posted by Doylem View Post
Thanks. To be honest, I'm having trouble getting to the remoter places that I love best, so I'm mostly having to stay local. But instead of fretting about the places I can't get to, I'm enjoying the experience of finding pictures closer to home... where the landscape is intimate rather than dramatic. If you come over here, I'll be happy to show you some wonderful places. Of course, it will probably be raining...
You're fortunate that staying local still means having beautiful countryside to photograph, even if it may be a bit short on drama. I spent about half of the last year stuck in suburbia without a car, and I did fret quite a bit about it. Anyway, I hope I will be able to take you up on that offer someday!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ijohn.8.80 View Post
Speaking of understanding and working (or playing) with light pre-camera, as has become my new mantra! What are your thoughts on light meters? I just ordered the Sekonic L-358, with the intention of getting the 1 degree spot sensor for it a bit later on to spot meter distant shots.

I'm trying to get to a point where I don't have to do much with Lightroom or Photoshop to any pictures as the real work has been done before even pressing the trigger. This I'd say is the secret to the great works of those I mentioned (and those I forgot to mention) in the previous post and from the documentaries I've been watching it appears is definitely the secret of the old masters!
Unless you're shooting film, gadgets like light meters are not going to make a major difference for most types of photography. The real key to getting interesting photographs is timing. With landscapes that means timing on several levels: time of year, time of day, and timing of ephemera. There simply is no substitute for being in the right place at the right time. That said, don't be too quick to dismiss the possibilities of the digital darkroom! Absolutely, getting things right at the moment of capture is the greatest part of the battle, but you're still responsible for what happens afterwards. Some people think it's too much work to get up for a sunrise shot or to wait around for good light, and others think it's too much work to finesse a photograph in post; ultimately, the person who avoids putting in extra effort on either end of things will be missing out on opportunities to create something extra special.

Mine for today is one from August. I'm still sorting through my autumn haul and look forward to sharing more of those shots soon.


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Old Nov 5, 2012, 08:16 AM   #69
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Old Nov 5, 2012, 08:54 AM   #70
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[QUOTE=ijohn.8.80;16226909]I have to say I really enjoy the composition and technique of the posts from you folks I've quoted below. I look forward to the day that my eye and ability is as good as yours!

Fcortese, AlexH, Cheese&Apple I get inspiration from yours too! I like the more quirky style observations that you guys do quite regularly, than postcard scenes I suppose. That's more in the vein of where I'm headed as a style I guess.

ijohn, thanks for the compliment. I never thought I'd be an inspiration on the photography end of things. I still view myself on the front end of the learning curve. I have always felt that the great people who contribute on this site and who so willingly share their expertise make it the main site I go to multiple times during the day to help me learn and grow as a photographer. The people who contribute to this site is what makes it so great, IMO.
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Old Nov 5, 2012, 11:29 AM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheese&Apple View Post
November is not the best time for photography in these parts. The beautiful Fall foliage is now decaying to mulch, we're post-Halloween, pre-Christmas, without snow and the weather is dreary even at the best of times. The upside to this is that I feel motivated to push myself beyond what I perceive to be my comfort-zone.

This weekend, I spent a wonderful afternoon in a local greenhouse...

Image
Centennial Park Greenhouse by Cheese&Apple on Flickr
I like the cropping to the essentials, although the actual flower - and its 'beak' - is larger than this pic. This is a Bird of Paradise and is a fairly common garden flower in my neck of the woods. Nice work
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Old Nov 5, 2012, 11:49 AM   #72
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Unless you're shooting film, gadgets like light meters are not going to make a major difference for most types of photography.

Image
I'd take exception to this one part of your response. Incident meters are, to my mind, one of the more important tools a photographer can have in their bag. Many (most?) amateurs rely on the in-camera metering, which is a poor substitute to understanding what the light really is and exposing correctly for it. In-camera meters, unless in a spot mode, use any one of a number of averaging techniques, which is a compromise that almost always gives a poor exposure.

Of course you are absolutely correct about timing - but put someone in the right place at the right time, and they still have to make a decision about exposure. Too often people simply rely on the in-camera meter to tell them what exposure to use, rather than measure the light, and then make some informed creative decisions about the exposure.

BTW - these latest photographs you've shared are beautiful.
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Old Nov 5, 2012, 12:01 PM   #73
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Good job on catching the mist and sun rays--not easy to do! Have you considered a crop that might get us in closer to that atmospheric goodness in the background? Just a thought!
Thanks! Like this? Or with the same aspect ratio?

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Old Nov 5, 2012, 12:07 PM   #74
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Old Nov 5, 2012, 12:10 PM   #75
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I'd take exception to this one part of your response. Incident meters are, to my mind, one of the more important tools a photographer can have in their bag. Many (most?) amateurs rely on the in-camera metering, which is a poor substitute to understanding what the light really is and exposing correctly for it. In-camera meters, unless in a spot mode, use any one of a number of averaging techniques, which is a compromise that almost always gives a poor exposure.

Of course you are absolutely correct about timing - but put someone in the right place at the right time, and they still have to make a decision about exposure. Too often people simply rely on the in-camera meter to tell them what exposure to use, rather than measure the light, and then make some informed creative decisions about the exposure.

BTW - these latest photographs you've shared are beautiful.
Thanks for your thoughts and your kind words, AxisOfBeagles. I appreciate your perspective about incident meters, though I personally have not found any need for an external light meter, and I think many here feel the same way. Using the camera's histograms and bracketing in tricky situations not only ensures great results but also helps one to learn a lot about light and metering. I'm surprised that you think in-camera meters "always give a poor exposure." I think you need to add a bunch of caveats on to that statement to make it true. Using an external meter certainly won't hurt, I just do not see it as any kind of priority for most purposes.

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Thanks! Like this? Or with the same aspect ratio?

Thumb resize.
That's better. Now the rays are more prominent in the frame. I guess I had the same aspect ratio in mind, but even this pano crop makes the misty background easier to see.
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