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Old Nov 28, 2012, 12:40 AM   #26
JohnDoe98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noiseordinance View Post
This is my third rMBP and my other two didn't have this problem (which doesn't doesn't mean they wouldn't have eventually, mind you). When looking on ifixit's teardown, they make it sound impossibly hard to remove the battery. However, the adhesive on this one looks to be a strip of double-sided adhesive foam, which makes me wonder if they changed the design to make battery replacement easier for technicians?
Are you in the United States? If so you are covered by the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act (if not, google the equivalent in your country). According to that act you are allowed to open and service some of the parts inside your machine (feel free to mention this act to the genius if need be, though don't do it pompously, just make it clear you know what you are talking about and won't be bullied). Obviously you can't mess with the batteries according to the MMWA because it is a biohazard to do so, which brings me to my point. If I were you I'd bring the unit in, with the picture, explain to them how you discovered this issue, and then claim you demand that they fix your machine because as it currently stands, it is a biohazard. The batteries shouldn't be rattling around like that and there is a genuine risk the batteries could puncture as a result of their movement when the machine heats up, which it will under normal working conditions. Make it clear that's not an acceptable risk that you are willing to take. Since you already went in for this problem previously, there is a record on file that this isn't your first complaint, and now you have evidence there is something severely wrong with the unit despite their claims to the contrary.

If they say they won't fix it, ask to speak to the store manager and demand a refund for your machine because you will not accept a machine in such a condition, you paid good money for this machine, you shouldn't have to live in fear of dealing with a battery leak, which isn't paranoia since your picture is evidence of this risk. Mention that this level of service is incredibly disappointing since Apple has some serious quality control issues. Mention this is your third unit and frankly your fed up of this mess. Say you won't leave until you have come to agreeable terms. Now, if they give you a new machine, which they should, ask to be compensated for your troubles. I complained about having to have my screen swapped twice and Apple gave me a card that's good for a 10% discount of my next purchase, whatever it is. If they continue to stonewall you, after giving them a chance to make it right (which I'm sure they will if you are persistent and courteous), mention, only as an absolute last resort, that you have no qualms of taking this issue to small claims court (which by the way you should do if it comes to it, though I doubt it will, with the picture I think they will likely now acknowledge the issue).

Most important things: #1 Do not get angry and emotional. #2 Address them with respect at all times. #3 Do not take no for an answer. #4 Try to schedule an appointment for a peak hour, so that many customers will hear you complaining. Apple cares about it's image and if there is someone complaining about the computers being a biohazard, and how there are all kinds of quality control issues, Apple will feel pressured to just get you out of the store happy. If you were frantic, they know other customers would write you off as a lunatic, but if you are presenting your case rationally and convincingly, the other customers will be taking notice, as will the managers.
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Old Nov 28, 2012, 03:48 AM   #27
Ccrew
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Originally Posted by JohnDoe98 View Post
Are you in the United States? If so you are covered by the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act (if not, google the equivalent in your country). According to that act you are allowed to open and service some of the parts inside your machine (feel free to mention this act to the genius if need be, though don't do it pompously, just make it clear you know what you are talking about and won't be bullied).
BS, MM Act has nothing to do with this. Feel free to point out the applicable spot:


http://www.mlmlaw.com/library/guides...s/undermag.htm

MM Act came about from Car manufacturers requiring the use of their oil filters in cars in order to maintain warranty. We all know now that that is not necessary. By stating that there are no user serviceable parts inside that MBP Apple has effectively covered themselves.

Last edited by Ccrew; Nov 28, 2012 at 03:57 AM.
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Old Nov 28, 2012, 04:09 AM   #28
JohnDoe98
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Originally Posted by Ccrew View Post
BS, MM Act has nothing to do with this. Feel free to point out the applicable spot:

http://www.mlmlaw.com/library/guides...s/undermag.htm

MM Act came about from Car manufacturers requiring the use of their oil filters in cars in order to maintain warranty. We all know now that that is not necessary. By stating that there are no user serviceable parts inside that MBP Apple has effectively covered themselves.
Sorry but according to section 102 C of the act, which covers all consumer products not just car manufacturers, tie-in-sales provisions are not typically allowed. Apple can't just state that there are no user-serviceable parts inside the RMBP, they actually have to do better. They have to apply to the FTC in order to get a waiver. Here's the important quote:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Source, FTC, or even in the page you linked
Although tie-in sales provisions generally are not allowed, you can include such a provision in your warranty if you can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the FTC that your product will not work properly without a specified item or service. If you believe that this is the case, you should contact the warranty staff of the FTC's Bureau of Consumer Protection for information on how to apply for a waiver of the tie-in sales prohibition.
But don't worry there are no such provisions in your warranty. I own a RMBP and nowhere in my warranty does Apple ever claim that there are no user serviceable parts. That's a bogus myth that is constantly being spread without a shred of evidence for it. But feel free to demonstrate where in my Warranty contract with Apple it says that I can't change the fans or the SSD in my RMBP. In fact you won't find it because there are no such tie-in-sales provisions in the warranty. The onus is on you to demonstrate the MMWA doesn't protect us, not the other way around since the MMWA is the default protection everyone automatically receives on all consumer products.

Oh and one more thing, the OP never replaced anything inside, he just opened it up, which again, can't be prohibited according to the MMWA unless special provisions are granted by the FTC, which they haven't been as Apple never applied for them and nowhere included such provisions in their warranties.

Last edited by JohnDoe98; Nov 28, 2012 at 04:26 AM.
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Old Nov 28, 2012, 07:31 PM   #29
Ccrew
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Originally Posted by JohnDoe98 View Post
Oh and one more thing, the OP never replaced anything inside, he just opened it up, which again, can't be prohibited according to the MMWA unless special provisions are granted by the FTC, which they haven't been as Apple never applied for them and nowhere included such provisions in their warranties.
Tell you what. Take that machine into Apple, have them tell you they won't fix it because you've been inside it, and tell us how far you get quoting that the MM act lets you do it. They'll tell you you've been spending too much time sniffing internet dust.

After you pay the lawyer, you could have bought a new Macbook. And you'll still be waiting for yours to get fixed. Because you can bet $ that the minute the word "lawyer" comes out of your mouth, all discussion ends. And I can assure you Apple has a much better legal team than you can afford. Just ask Samsung.
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Old Nov 28, 2012, 11:21 PM   #30
noiseordinance
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Lol, anyways, back on track here, took it into the apple store tonight. Turns out this is a refurbished unit with a poorly replaced battery sold as new, in new packaging and everything. They are going to replace it, round four. What a heap of crap this endeavor has turned out to be be. Apple is very quickly losing my respect.
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Old Nov 28, 2012, 11:56 PM   #31
JohnDoe98
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Originally Posted by noiseordinance View Post
Lol, anyways, back on track here, took it into the apple store tonight. Turns out this is a refurbished unit with a poorly replaced battery sold as new, in new packaging and everything. They are going to replace it, round four. What a heap of crap this endeavor has turned out to be be. Apple is very quickly losing my respect.
Well it's good to hear they changed the unit for you. Hopefully the one you now have is good.

----------

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Originally Posted by Ccrew View Post
Tell you what. Take that machine into Apple, have them tell you they won't fix it because you've been inside it, and tell us how far you get quoting that the MM act lets you do it. They'll tell you you've been spending too much time sniffing internet dust.

After you pay the lawyer, you could have bought a new Macbook. And you'll still be waiting for yours to get fixed. Because you can bet $ that the minute the word "lawyer" comes out of your mouth, all discussion ends. And I can assure you Apple has a much better legal team than you can afford. Just ask Samsung.
First off, I said I'd mention anything about courts only as an absolute last resort, which means at that point Apple wouldn't be doing anything anyway, so the discussion would already be ended. Second, you don't need a lawyer for small claims court, you can litigate those cases yourself. Third, it isn't about who's legal team is better. Just have a look at this for instance:

http://www.seattlerex.com/seattle-re...verdict-is-in/

A blogger beat Apple in court.

Last edited by JohnDoe98; Nov 29, 2012 at 12:02 AM.
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Old Nov 29, 2012, 12:48 AM   #32
mac jones
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Yikes. Tons of companies tell you they will not honor a warranty an item if you open it. So your giving advice telling people to basically ignore them, "And not be bullied"?

Bad advice. I'm certain you will make a fine attorney ( or whatever) , but perhaps counseling is not your thing.
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Old Nov 29, 2012, 12:54 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by noiseordinance View Post
Lol, anyways, back on track here, took it into the apple store tonight. Turns out this is a refurbished unit with a poorly replaced battery sold as new, in new packaging and everything. They are going to replace it, round four. What a heap of crap this endeavor has turned out to be be. Apple is very quickly losing my respect.
So you are confirming that apple sells returned/refurbished macs as new? I've seen this brought up in quite a few threads and has been a controversial topic lately.
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Old Nov 29, 2012, 01:28 AM   #34
JohnDoe98
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Originally Posted by mac jones View Post
Yikes. Tons of companies tell you they will not honor a warranty an item if you open it. So your giving advice telling people to basically ignore them, "And not be bullied"?

Bad advice. I'm certain you will make a fine attorney ( or whatever) , but perhaps counseling is not your thing.
It depends on the individual circumstances. If your warranty, or the terms of your contract, state that tampering or opening the device will void the warranty, that's one thing. In those cases you will have to do research to find out if you can mess around with the items yourself. But if there is no such statement in writing, then I'm saying you can safely assume you are protected by the MMWA.

But give us some concrete examples you might have in mind. And if you think you can't open your computer up, please tell me where Apple says that you cannot.

----------

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Originally Posted by Irock619 View Post
So you are confirming that apple sells returned/refurbished macs as new? I've seen this brought up in quite a few threads and has been a controversial topic lately.
No he's not confirming that. He mentioned Apple had serviced his computer three times, and was on his way to a fourth now. The first machine was brand new, but the parts they used when they did the first repair and subsequent repairs on it might have been refurbished parts. In your warranty it says that Apple will use, at its own discretion, new or refurbished parts that function as new, and have the same reliability as new parts, when doing any repairs.
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Old Nov 29, 2012, 03:28 AM   #35
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Originally Posted by prisstratton View Post
Based on the fact that it had no user serviceable parts, plus the use of security screws (I was not aware of that), I would guess that "YES" opening would likely void the warranty.
Except that's not on the Apple website. It doesn't say specifically opening your rMBP voids the warranty, so it doesn't.
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Old Feb 18, 2014, 03:04 PM   #36
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I have a 13" rMBP that just started to rattle inside. Sounds nearly identical to your situation. When the machine is cold, it doesn't happen but when in use, it does.

Really don't want to start this game of Genius' telling me nothing is wrong and scratching up my machine while they all do god knows what "out back". Thinking of just selling it and getting an iMac.
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