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Old Dec 13, 2012, 02:21 PM   #26
GermanyChris
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I probably wouldn't switch...
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 02:28 PM   #27
takeshi74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickH88 View Post
So, how difficult would the adjustment be for me? How disoriented would I be at first? How quickly do you think I would adapt?
Impossible to say. Try it and see for yourself. It isn't a one-size-fits-all matter. I can't see using anything other than a Magic Trackpad these days (aside from the Logitech Trackman). I find it extremely disappointing to have to use a Windows laptop's touchpad without fluid inertial scrolling, excellent gesture support, two finger scrolling, etc. YMMV as with any other subjective matter.

I'd say don't assess it solely in the store. Spend a couple weeks or so with it to get past the differences (until you're comfortable with it and using it is second nature) and then make your decision -- especially if you're the type that dislikes change in general.

Last edited by takeshi74; Dec 13, 2012 at 02:36 PM.
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 03:04 PM   #28
Freyqq
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickH88 View Post
I've used PCs/ Windows all of my life, but am thinking of getting a MacBook Pro. I'm concerned that the differences may be difficult to adjust to, though.

  1. PC laptop touchpad and pointing stick vs. Mac Trackpad

    I have become extremely proficient with a standard PC laptop touchpad. I also love the "pointing stick" mice that a few models have (see this if you're not sure what I'm talking about). I know the Mac's Trackpad is different; you push down anywhere on it to click instead of moving to an actual button. This click also sounds louder to me than a click on a PC touchpad mouse's buttons, and I feel that it may be annoying to hear repeatedly. I am used to often using 2 fingers with the PC touchpad (1 index finger for the actual touchpad and the other for the buttons), which doesn't really seem like a possibility on the MBP. I sometimes do tap the actual touchpad area to click, which fortunately, I've read is an option on the MBP touchpad.

    I'm also an avid right-clicker, and I know that to do so on the MBP, you must either hold the Command key as you click, or click with two fingers.

    I'm also used to scrolling on a PC touchpad (slide finger along right edge to scroll vertically; slide finger along bottom edge to scroll horizontally).

  2. Ctrl vs. Command

    I use Ctrl shortcuts constantly. I know I can do all the same things with the Command keys; however, they are in different locations on the keyboard, and I am used to quickly typing Ctrl+V, etc., without even looking at the keys.

  3. no equivalent of PC Delete key

    As you know, the PC Delete key allows you to delete text going forwards. There is no way to do that on a MBP (as far as I know). I actually use the PC Delete key quite often, both to delete text and to delete files, and although I can do the latter with the MBP Delete key, it's in the location that I'm used to Backspace being in (which obviously doesn't delete files).

  4. completely different OS

    This one should speak for itself. I know Windows and its native programs inside and out, while I have zero experience with (and little knowledge of) OS X and it's native programs.

    I know I can still have Windows via Boot Camp, but I have to imagine I will be using OS X the majority of the time.

So, how difficult would the adjustment be for me? How disoriented would I be at first? How quickly do you think I would adapt?

BTW, I don't want to use an external mouse and/or keyboard to alleviate issues 1-3.

Thanks!
1. the mac touchpad is the best i've ever used. Just be sure to use the reverse scrolling option so that it is back to normal.
2. Personally, I have the same issue b\c I use pcs a lot. In OSX, you can set it in keyboard settings to swap the control and command keys, so that control+C = copy and such.
3. fn+backspace = delete
4. there's a couple big differences between OSX and windows, but they seem to be shrinking after every OS revision. The dock is almost identical to the taskbar, and there is a bar across the top with file, edit, etc instead of having each program contain its own top bar. Structurally, the OS puts its version of the registry in USERS/x/Library. Also, programs are usually contained within one file, rather than having a folder with a lot of different files. This is a bit of an OS trick, though, as that one "file" is really a folder that contains all the necessary files. You can right click and hit "show package contents" to see the inner workings of a program, but this is rarely necessary.
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 04:09 PM   #29
AirThis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickH88 View Post
I've used PCs/ Windows all of my life, but am thinking of getting a MacBook Pro. I'm concerned that the differences may be difficult to adjust to, though.

[LIST=1][*]PC laptop touchpad and pointing stick vs. Mac Trackpad

I have become extremely proficient with a standard PC laptop touchpad. I also love the "pointing stick" mice that a few models have (see this if you're not sure what I'm talking about). I know the Mac's Trackpad is different; you push down anywhere on it to click instead of moving to an actual button. This click also sounds louder to me than a click on a PC touchpad mouse's buttons, and I feel that it may be annoying to hear repeatedly. I am used to often using 2 fingers with the PC touchpad (1 index finger for the actual touchpad and the other for the buttons), which doesn't really seem like a possibility on the MBP. I sometimes do tap the actual touchpad area to click, which fortunately, I've read is an option on the MBP touchpad.

You're making this more complicated than it should be. Remember that scene in Minority Report where Tom Cruise is swiping through all those case files with his fingers? That's what the OSX UI feels like.

I'm also an avid right-clicker, and I know that to do so on the MBP, you must either hold the Command key as you click, or click with two fingers.

On a Mac you can single click with 2 fingers and you will get the same result. Just make sure both fingers hit the deck at the same time.

[*]Ctrl vs. Command

I use Ctrl shortcuts constantly. I know I can do all the same things with the Command keys; however, they are in different locations on the keyboard, and I am used to quickly typing Ctrl+V, etc., without even looking at the keys.

The Mac shortcuts are actually much more powerful than those provided with Windows. It will take some getting used to at first, but once you get the hang of it you won't want anything else. A lot of Windows users don't realize this, but the Mac has a very long history of using keyboard shortcuts.

[*]no equivalent of PC Delete key

As you know, the PC Delete key allows you to delete text going forwards. There is no way to do that on a MBP (as far as I know). I actually use the PC Delete key quite often, both to delete text and to delete files, and although I can do the latter with the MBP Delete key, it's in the location that I'm used to Backspace being in (which obviously doesn't delete files).

Um... how to put this delicately... would this be a good time for me to give you that badly needed "real men don't..." lecture?

More seriously... You'll be having so much fun that I doubt you'll miss that key. I like using the command line (in terminal) and the only keys, I needed to learn (on a non-US Mac keyboard) are these:


~ = alt-n
| = alt-7
{ = alt-(
} = alt-)
[ = alt-5
] = alt-6
# = alt-3
\ = option-shift-7




[*]completely different OS

This one should speak for itself. I know Windows and its native programs inside and out, while I have zero experience with (and little knowledge of) OS X and it's native programs.

You'll have so much fun with OSX that you just won't believe it. There are a lot of native apps provided and they are often much more powerful than their Windows counterparts. After spending 3 minutes editing a home video in iMovie, you'll never want to perform that task in Windows again.


Thanks!
See my comments above.
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 05:28 PM   #30
Essenar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickH88 View Post
I've used PCs/ Windows all of my life, but am thinking of getting a MacBook Pro. I'm concerned that the differences may be difficult to adjust to, though.

  1. PC laptop touchpad and pointing stick vs. Mac Trackpad

    I have become extremely proficient with a standard PC laptop touchpad. I also love the "pointing stick" mice that a few models have (see this if you're not sure what I'm talking about). I know the Mac's Trackpad is different; you push down anywhere on it to click instead of moving to an actual button. This click also sounds louder to me than a click on a PC touchpad mouse's buttons, and I feel that it may be annoying to hear repeatedly. I am used to often using 2 fingers with the PC touchpad (1 index finger for the actual touchpad and the other for the buttons), which doesn't really seem like a possibility on the MBP. I sometimes do tap the actual touchpad area to click, which fortunately, I've read is an option on the MBP touchpad.

    I'm also an avid right-clicker, and I know that to do so on the MBP, you must either hold the Command key as you click, or click with two fingers.

    I'm also used to scrolling on a PC touchpad (slide finger along right edge to scroll vertically; slide finger along bottom edge to scroll horizontally).

  2. Ctrl vs. Command

    I use Ctrl shortcuts constantly. I know I can do all the same things with the Command keys; however, they are in different locations on the keyboard, and I am used to quickly typing Ctrl+V, etc., without even looking at the keys.

  3. no equivalent of PC Delete key

    As you know, the PC Delete key allows you to delete text going forwards. There is no way to do that on a MBP (as far as I know). I actually use the PC Delete key quite often, both to delete text and to delete files, and although I can do the latter with the MBP Delete key, it's in the location that I'm used to Backspace being in (which obviously doesn't delete files).

  4. completely different OS

    This one should speak for itself. I know Windows and its native programs inside and out, while I have zero experience with (and little knowledge of) OS X and it's native programs.

    I know I can still have Windows via Boot Camp, but I have to imagine I will be using OS X the majority of the time.

So, how difficult would the adjustment be for me? How disoriented would I be at first? How quickly do you think I would adapt?

BTW, I don't want to use an external mouse and/or keyboard to alleviate issues 1-3.

Thanks!
First, most of the people here used Windows a few years ago, some even almost a decade ago (Last experience was Windows XP) so not only do they not understand the software differences but more importantly, the hardware differences.

Up until about one month ago, I was a hardcore PC user. Make no mistake, I was not only a Windows user, but I was a gamer, builder and tweaker. I set up custom gaming laptops and desktops, used Windows XP, Vista and 7 emphatically.

I'm an engineering student in my senior year so I've even spent 4 years using Windows for writing reports, working, setting up projects, doing research and reading articles and forums.

I'm somewhat the exact circumstance as you so I'll break this down as best as I can:
[*]Ctrl vs. Command
I use my left thumb and right thumb to strike and hold the Command key and it works very well because my thumb doesn't feel uncomfortable at all and I rarely need to hit the space key at the same time as a command shortcut. I just "curl" my left or right thumb inward, hit and hold and the opposite hand hits the appropriate key. I've gotten quite accustomed to it.
[*]no equivalent of PC Delete key
Function + Delete as others may have mentioned. Also note that there's a free App for OSX on the App Store called "Cheat Sheet" which shows you ALL the available shortcuts for the App you are currently using. All you do is hold Command for a few seconds and a dark transparent overlay displays all the shortcuts you can use. It's very useful.
[*]completely different OS
I will say that most people on this forum are biased and can't offer you a reliable opinion on Windows versus Mac. There's even people here who are so blindly loyal to Apple that they run around and claim that OSX is as good of a gaming OS as Windows when most real Mac gamers agree that Boot Camp with Windows is the way to go. Also bear in mind that most people here are comparing their OSX experience to what they 'remember' from Windows when XP was the top dog and what they view from a third person perspective of their friends/relatives who own Windows laptops.

I'll tell you as best as I can, what you'll notice:

You're not the boss anymore:
With Windows, the UAC and dark overlay popup is pretty commonplace. Most times you need to accomplish something, you have to run applications as administrator. Accessing the "registry", modifying the internals of Windows is not a strange thing to do. With OSX, this isn't the case. It's not easy to view system files on OSX and even doing something like deleting 'kext' files requires entering your password. The operating system wasn't designed with the intention of you being underneath the hood tweaking it. I had a hard time adjusting to this. It's like, I would describe using Windows as a laborious experience, almost like being at work. And OSX is like the first time you've ever gone on vacation in years. You have a hard time just 'sitting down and relaxing' but once you do, you really enjoy it.

One thing you'll notice: A lot of software suites on OSX are designed to work really REALLY well with minimum tweaking. For example, in Microsoft Office 2010, I got used to the white page view with a small toolbar on the top. In Office for Mac, I was bombarded with a myriad of tools and while it seems somewhat cluttered at first glance, it's actually very nicely done. For example, Notebook Layout in Word makes your notes look LIKE notes and it makes it easier on your eyes to keep up with lectures. It also has built in Audio Notes. On Windows Office, I had to install an audio note feature and it didn't work nearly as well as OSX.

Gestures. When you get used to TrackPad gestures, you will never miss your mouse nipple ever again. I used to own a ThinkPad T series and I got quite familiar with the pointing stick. I couldn't imagine not having it. Now that I've gotten used to TrackPad gestures, I don't even want a mouse or pointing stick. The three finger swipe up means I'm never "out of space" with open applications. Apple really nailed it with the finger gestures and multi tasking features.

Hot corners. When I want to close my screen and run off to class or to the gym, all I do is put my mouse cursor in the upper right corner and boom, my laptop is sleeping. No need to hit menus, close the lid, press buttons. I simply put the cursor top right and it sleeps. You would think that would get annoying if it happens accidentally. On the contrary, it has a very short delay. It's small enough that it feels instant when you need it to be, but long enough that if you accidentally brush the right corner while moving things around, it won't sleep. My bottom right corner is for notifications (mail, messages from Adium, text messages from Google Voice or Calendar notifications), my top left corner is for Desktop view (moves everything off screen so I can view my desktop) and my bottom left corner is for my dashboard.

Updates shmupdates. One thing I hated about Windows was it's "screw you" method of installing updates. I was in the middle of a movie with a date, full screen, things were going GREAT with me and her. She was enjoying the movie, I just fixed her a drink. Randomly the movie exits full screen and my computer starts shutting down. It says "Configuring Updates. Do not power off or unplug the computer". It took 6 minutes for it to shut down. No big right? Small chat for 6 minutes and we'll be good to go? I restarted, it was configuring 9 updates and it took 15 minutes. The buzz was killed and she had to go shortly after. Windows.... The "something other than pop-up" blocker. What's that? You can configure the Update settings differently? If that's the case, why the HELL would the DEFAULT recommended settings be to shut down your computer without asking? What engineer proposed that and managed to keep his high paying job at Microsoft?

I can't even imagine the conversation:
"Okay guys let's talk updates... How should we handle them?"
D-Bag Stevens (Chief Engineer) : "I think updates should be #1 most important and we should shut down the computer immediately when they're done. That should be the way."
Future Apple engineer: "Don't you think we should install the updates in Windows and put a small notification in the corner to restart? Let them restart when they're done working?"
D-Bag Stevens: "Are you crazy? Don't you know that if you install Windows updates while in Windows, the computer will go Ape **** and babies will go flying all over the place with explosions?"
Future Apple engineer: "Well okay then, as long as they can get back to work as soon as it's done restarting."
D-Bag Stevens: "Well it will have to configure the updates when the computer starts..."
Future Apple engineer: "But wasn't it installing them when it was shutting down? You have to install again?"
D-Bag Stevens: "Well yeah, we installed them when we were shutting down, now we have to configure them when we start it up... It's a complicated process but it makes sense. And this should be the default setting."
Future Apple engineer: "I think I'm done here, good luck guys."

The most time my MacBook has spent without me being able to use it was when it was installing Windows updates in Boot Camp, go figure. OSX updates install in the background while you work and when they're done it's one quick restart and you're back in business. And it's minimal. I've had to 'restart' OSX probably 4 times since I bought my MacBook from OSX and one of them was to install Boot Camp.

The best part is the most subtle novelty: No antivirus. I didn't notice how much I didn't enjoy leaving my computer on scanning for infections one day a week until I didn't have to do it anymore. If you have any more questions let me know. I was quite an Anti-Apple head until I had the funds to actually spend on one.
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 05:33 PM   #31
richnyc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlieegan3 View Post
3. fn+bksp
Thanks, I actually, learned something very useful today I was missing it, too but lazy to look for it. I kinda knew that I will discover how to do it soon or later... BTW, on my MBP it is 'Fn' and 'DELETE' keys

Re. the transition, I've been on PCs for more than 15 years... I'm on a Mac for the past month. Not looking back at all. So far, I'm loving the OS X!!!

The two best things fo me are definitely trackpad with all the gestures and up to 16 different workspaces (or virtual desktops). There is no way around it, once you'll get use to the trackpad (I did in less than an hour) there is no going back!!! Way more efficient and faster than anything else out there Plus, the workspaces allow me to have many apps/programs open at the same time and switch between them quickly.
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 05:39 PM   #32
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I am in the same boat as the OP. Long time windows user and received my first mac a couple of days ago. I am still adjusting to the OS X but so far, I am loving it...especially the touchpad, its awesome!! I will be attending the courses offered at the Apple store to better familiarized with the OS X.
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 05:43 PM   #33
charlieegan3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by richnyc View Post
Thanks, I actually, learned something very useful today I was missing it, too but lazy to look for it. I kinda knew that I will discover how to do it soon or later... BTW, on my MBP it is 'Fn' and 'DELETE' keys

Re. the transition, I've been on PCs for more than 15 years... I'm on a Mac for the past month. Not looking back at all. So far, I'm loving the OS X!!!

The two best things fo me are definitely trackpad with all the gestures and up to 16 different workspaces (or virtual desktops). There is no way around it, once you'll get use to the trackpad (I did in less than an hour) there is no going back!!! Way more efficient and faster than anything else out there Plus, the workspaces allow me to have many apps/programs open at the same time and switch between them quickly.
Always nice to hear from another happy convert - I personally started out with Mac and have been on Windows, Mac and some Linux all in Parallel ever since.

stay tuned here for tips and support

----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by wicked45 View Post
I am in the same boat as the OP. Long time windows user and received my first mac a couple of days ago. I am still adjusting to the OS X but so far, I am loving it...especially the touchpad, its awesome!! I will be attending the courses offered at the Apple store to better familiarized with the OS X.
There are some videos on their site that are great at covering the basics - if you've not seen them already I'd recommend a quick look.

If you've got any questions make use of the forums here - normally the quickest way for an answer.
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 05:47 PM   #34
wicked45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlieegan3 View Post
Always nice to hear from another happy convert - I personally started out with Mac and have been on Windows, Mac and some Linux all in Parallel ever since.

stay tuned here for tips and support

----------



There are some videos on their site that are great at covering the basics - if you've not seen them already I'd recommend a quick look.

If you've got any questions make use of the forums here - normally the quickest way for an answer.
Hi Charlie,

Can you please send me the link to the videos? I have looked but couldnt find them. Maybe I am not looking hard enough or looking at the wrong section.

I agree, this forum has been great for me. You guys rock!! As a first time Mac user, I'll be sure to be posting on this forum more often...thanks in advance!
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 05:58 PM   #35
charlieegan3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wicked45 View Post
Hi Charlie,

Can you please send me the link to the videos? I have looked but couldnt find them. Maybe I am not looking hard enough or looking at the wrong section.

I agree, this forum has been great for me. You guys rock!! As a first time Mac user, I'll be sure to be posting on this forum more often...thanks in advance!
here you go:
http://www.apple.com/findouthow/mac/

I imagine you'll know a lot of this already though. Might find some useful stuff in there all the same.

If you're into reading here is another good comprehensive guide: http://macs.about.com/od/usingyourma...icuserpath.htm

It also goes into a fair bit more depth.
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 06:01 PM   #36
Haifisch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Essenar View Post
First, most of the people here used Windows a few years ago, some even almost a decade ago (Last experience was Windows XP) so not only do they not understand the software differences but more importantly, the hardware differences.

Up until about one month ago, I was a hardcore PC user. Make no mistake, I was not only a Windows user, but I was a gamer, builder and tweaker. I set up custom gaming laptops and desktops, used Windows XP, Vista and 7 emphatically.

I'm an engineering student in my senior year so I've even spent 4 years using Windows for writing reports, working, setting up projects, doing research and reading articles and forums.

I'm somewhat the exact circumstance as you so I'll break this down as best as I can:
[*]Ctrl vs. Command
I use my left thumb and right thumb to strike and hold the Command key and it works very well because my thumb doesn't feel uncomfortable at all and I rarely need to hit the space key at the same time as a command shortcut. I just "curl" my left or right thumb inward, hit and hold and the opposite hand hits the appropriate key. I've gotten quite accustomed to it.
[*]no equivalent of PC Delete key
Function + Delete as others may have mentioned. Also note that there's a free App for OSX on the App Store called "Cheat Sheet" which shows you ALL the available shortcuts for the App you are currently using. All you do is hold Command for a few seconds and a dark transparent overlay displays all the shortcuts you can use. It's very useful.
[*]completely different OS
I will say that most people on this forum are biased and can't offer you a reliable opinion on Windows versus Mac. There's even people here who are so blindly loyal to Apple that they run around and claim that OSX is as good of a gaming OS as Windows when most real Mac gamers agree that Boot Camp with Windows is the way to go. Also bear in mind that most people here are comparing their OSX experience to what they 'remember' from Windows when XP was the top dog and what they view from a third person perspective of their friends/relatives who own Windows laptops.

I'll tell you as best as I can, what you'll notice:

You're not the boss anymore:
With Windows, the UAC and dark overlay popup is pretty commonplace. Most times you need to accomplish something, you have to run applications as administrator. Accessing the "registry", modifying the internals of Windows is not a strange thing to do. With OSX, this isn't the case. It's not easy to view system files on OSX and even doing something like deleting 'kext' files requires entering your password. The operating system wasn't designed with the intention of you being underneath the hood tweaking it. I had a hard time adjusting to this. It's like, I would describe using Windows as a laborious experience, almost like being at work. And OSX is like the first time you've ever gone on vacation in years. You have a hard time just 'sitting down and relaxing' but once you do, you really enjoy it.

One thing you'll notice: A lot of software suites on OSX are designed to work really REALLY well with minimum tweaking. For example, in Microsoft Office 2010, I got used to the white page view with a small toolbar on the top. In Office for Mac, I was bombarded with a myriad of tools and while it seems somewhat cluttered at first glance, it's actually very nicely done. For example, Notebook Layout in Word makes your notes look LIKE notes and it makes it easier on your eyes to keep up with lectures. It also has built in Audio Notes. On Windows Office, I had to install an audio note feature and it didn't work nearly as well as OSX.

Gestures. When you get used to TrackPad gestures, you will never miss your mouse nipple ever again. I used to own a ThinkPad T series and I got quite familiar with the pointing stick. I couldn't imagine not having it. Now that I've gotten used to TrackPad gestures, I don't even want a mouse or pointing stick. The three finger swipe up means I'm never "out of space" with open applications. Apple really nailed it with the finger gestures and multi tasking features.

Hot corners. When I want to close my screen and run off to class or to the gym, all I do is put my mouse cursor in the upper right corner and boom, my laptop is sleeping. No need to hit menus, close the lid, press buttons. I simply put the cursor top right and it sleeps. You would think that would get annoying if it happens accidentally. On the contrary, it has a very short delay. It's small enough that it feels instant when you need it to be, but long enough that if you accidentally brush the right corner while moving things around, it won't sleep. My bottom right corner is for notifications (mail, messages from Adium, text messages from Google Voice or Calendar notifications), my top left corner is for Desktop view (moves everything off screen so I can view my desktop) and my bottom left corner is for my dashboard.

Updates shmupdates. One thing I hated about Windows was it's "screw you" method of installing updates. I was in the middle of a movie with a date, full screen, things were going GREAT with me and her. She was enjoying the movie, I just fixed her a drink. Randomly the movie exits full screen and my computer starts shutting down. It says "Configuring Updates. Do not power off or unplug the computer". It took 6 minutes for it to shut down. No big right? Small chat for 6 minutes and we'll be good to go? I restarted, it was configuring 9 updates and it took 15 minutes. The buzz was killed and she had to go shortly after. Windows.... The "something other than pop-up" blocker. What's that? You can configure the Update settings differently? If that's the case, why the HELL would the DEFAULT recommended settings be to shut down your computer without asking? What engineer proposed that and managed to keep his high paying job at Microsoft?

I can't even imagine the conversation:
"Okay guys let's talk updates... How should we handle them?"
D-Bag Stevens (Chief Engineer) : "I think updates should be #1 most important and we should shut down the computer immediately when they're done. That should be the way."
Future Apple engineer: "Don't you think we should install the updates in Windows and put a small notification in the corner to restart? Let them restart when they're done working?"
D-Bag Stevens: "Are you crazy? Don't you know that if you install Windows updates while in Windows, the computer will go Ape **** and babies will go flying all over the place with explosions?"
Future Apple engineer: "Well okay then, as long as they can get back to work as soon as it's done restarting."
D-Bag Stevens: "Well it will have to configure the updates when the computer starts..."
Future Apple engineer: "But wasn't it installing them when it was shutting down? You have to install again?"
D-Bag Stevens: "Well yeah, we installed them when we were shutting down, now we have to configure them when we start it up... It's a complicated process but it makes sense. And this should be the default setting."
Future Apple engineer: "I think I'm done here, good luck guys."

The most time my MacBook has spent without me being able to use it was when it was installing Windows updates in Boot Camp, go figure. OSX updates install in the background while you work and when they're done it's one quick restart and you're back in business. And it's minimal. I've had to 'restart' OSX probably 4 times since I bought my MacBook from OSX and one of them was to install Boot Camp.

The best part is the most subtle novelty: No antivirus. I didn't notice how much I didn't enjoy leaving my computer on scanning for infections one day a week until I didn't have to do it anymore. If you have any more questions let me know. I was quite an Anti-Apple head until I had the funds to actually spend on one.
Thanks for sharing. Sounds pretty accurate. Haters bash Apple saying their hardware costs more for the same specs. It's true, until you realize how much time it takes to maintain a Windows machine. Then you realize that Macbook is a bargain.

I'm going to parrot what everybody else said about the trackpad: it is Apple's gift to humanity. I switched in 2007 and when I first discovered two-finger scroll, I was like "that is so obvious, why didn't anybody else think of that?!!?!"
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 06:03 PM   #37
spb3
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I was a life-long PC/windows user. One day I saw an imac on CL that was just cheap and I bought it. I have to admit the first few weeks are frustrating. I was starting from zero. Lots of googling, article reading and trial&error. But in the end it is rewarding. Right now at home I only use mac. At work it is PC.
No regrets.

Seems like you've done quite some hw (i was looking for ctrl key for a while and right click, where is it!?) which puts you up the hill on the learning curve.

If you have patience you can do it. And I think you will like it.
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Old Dec 13, 2012, 07:16 PM   #38
Poisonivy326
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Longtime Windows user switched to Mac OS. I guess the biggest adjustment for me was the way to exit applications and plug-ins. With Macs the process isn't just unplugging the USB or clicking the X button. You have to physically quit each application and eject each plug-in, and that can be a bit clunky. But otherwise the Mac OS is very easy. Coming from Windows I find it almost to be a little TOO easy, meaning with Windows you are kind of on your own. You have to figure out how to install a driver, how to configure your computer, etc. With Mac it's like everything is done for you, dragged and dropped and boom there it is on your screen.

If I could make an analogy (since I'm a teacher) it's this: Windows is like the teacher that says "Sit down, open your textbook, answer questions 1-10 on p. __ and hand it in by the end of the period." Mac OSX is like the teacher that says "Ok class today we're going to learn about __ and here's my presentation to show you about ___ and ___."
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 01:53 AM   #39
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I've used ThinkPads for almost 20 years. I always used the track point and couldn't stand the trackpad to the point of turning it off in the settings. When I switched to a MacBook Pro, I was amazed at how much better the trackpad was. Given a choice I will use a mouse when convenient but the trackpad is great.

One reference I found useful was David Pouge's book "Switching to the Mac". It covers all the major differences.
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 02:38 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by Essenar View Post
It's not easy to view system files on OSX and even doing something like deleting 'kext' files requires entering your password. The operating system wasn't designed with the intention of you being underneath the hood tweaking it. I had a hard time adjusting to this. It's like, I would describe using Windows as a laborious experience, almost like being at work. And OSX is like the first time you've ever gone on vacation in years. You have a hard time just 'sitting down and relaxing' but once you do, you really enjoy it.
I disagree. OS X offers you a very rich (terminal) command set to access its internal database, tweak individual settings and generally adjust the system to your liking. You can even change your network's MAC address. And not to mention that the configuration files (plists) are human-readable, easy-to-tweak and usually more logically organised than the Window's registry. For a programmer, Apple offers a very rich set of APIs which even allow you to extend standard UI controls; e.g. changing the system-wide spellchecker or adding a new file system type. The only thing where Windows is ahead when it comes to customisation is the looks - theme support is pretty much non-existant on OS X.

Its simply that you don't have to do all that with OS X to be productive because the initial set up of the OS is good enough.
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 03:03 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by NickH88 View Post
Yup, I'm currently a Computer Science student (though as I mentioned above, I want to switch to Film).
After a week of intensive usage, you would become completely fluent with all the basic stuff.
Then, if you like to learn advanced things ("Linux-style"), after a year or so
you would become a real Mac OS X "superuser"
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 09:10 AM   #42
Mdwall
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I'm in a similar place. I've had my mac about a month now and it is hard at the very first to break 20 years of Windows habits. It's really not as hard as some make it out to be though. Sure I have had to learn the command key is my friend and I learn something new almost every day but overall it is pretty easy. I liken it to buying a new car from a different manufacturer. Overall pretty similar but the details are different. Ad in this case, far more streamlined and easier to learn. It is hard though because I still have to u se a PC at work and a lot of the multitouch gestures I have to retry on my work computer because I'm already getting comfortable with the way OSX does them. That should tell you a lot if one can almost untrained 20 years of habit in one month.
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 09:29 AM   #43
Spikeywan
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I've not had mine for 24 hours yet, and there's loads of things that I can't do. However, every time I find out how to do something it's a case of "That was so simple and obvious! Why didn't I think of trying that!?"

And, despite these things, I'm loving it almost as much as my FireBlade [1], already. What you can do with the touch pad is incredible. It's so much easier to use than a Windows laptop.

[1] A Honda CBR900RR motorcycle, which was less than 500 more expensive than my rMPB!!
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 12:26 PM   #44
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But boy do I miss that 'snap" feature in Windows 7! I find myself going to and from Win 7 regularly, mainly for work (Office etc...) and gaming as I cant find anything in the Apple world comparable to Business Contact Manager (suggestions welcome). Thats the great thing about the mac though, you can install Windows os and flit to it if need be.
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 01:02 PM   #45
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Before heeding the advice of OS X converts, keep in mind that most made the switch during the XP/Vista days. Most situations of why OSX is 'better' has long past.

I see a lot of examples of "my grandma always calls me about problems ____ on windows xp! i gave her a brand new mac, and i never hear from her anymore!", or even the example above about Windows updates messing up a date night...on XP.

I use Win7/8 and OS X. At the end of the day, they are just vehicles to help you do what you want, and they both get you there. Windows 8 now has comparable gestures, and the hardware to support it (Logitech's new Touchpad is comparable if not better than Apple's -- about time)

OS X and Windows have gone a long long way to optimize user experience. From a purely technical perspective, its all about what applications you need to run and how optimal you'd like those applications to run.

Personally, I have a rMBP because I can have whatever OS I want, but only because Apple requires Apple hardware for OS X. Be warned that Apple also made no effort to optimize bootcamp - so Windows is less than ideal (terrible battery life, poor fan control).
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 01:38 PM   #46
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I honestly wouldn't recommend going and talking to a genius bat worker. Most of them are morons and treat you like you are an idiot who knows nothing about technology.

I made the switch back in July. I still use PC for work and gaming. But honestly it isnt hard switching over. The command button has the same placement on the keyboard as the control does on a PC. However if you plan on using win 7 on your macbook you might find it annoying with the only control button.

The OS does take a little getting use to. Google became my best friend in my first week as a mac user.

The track pad is awesome. You can enable right click if you want. But scrolling is made easier with the trackpad.
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 03:50 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by minnus View Post
Before heeding the advice of OS X converts, keep in mind that most made the switch during the XP/Vista days. Most situations of why OSX is 'better' has long past.

I see a lot of examples of "my grandma always calls me about problems ____ on windows xp! i gave her a brand new mac, and i never hear from her anymore!", or even the example above about Windows updates messing up a date night...on XP.

I use Win7/8 and OS X. At the end of the day, they are just vehicles to help you do what you want, and they both get you there. Windows 8 now has comparable gestures, and the hardware to support it (Logitech's new Touchpad is comparable if not better than Apple's -- about time)

OS X and Windows have gone a long long way to optimize user experience. From a purely technical perspective, its all about what applications you need to run and how optimal you'd like those applications to run.

Personally, I have a rMBP because I can have whatever OS I want, but only because Apple requires Apple hardware for OS X. Be warned that Apple also made no effort to optimize bootcamp - so Windows is less than ideal (terrible battery life, poor fan control).
Sorry but you're mistaken. I'm a Windows 7 convert. That date night ruined was Windows 7 with its Recommended Settings. You clearly didn't read the post. The default setting for Windows 7 Updates is to install during shut down and to configure during restart.

And Windows 8 touchpad is a joke. In fact, Windows 8 is a joke unless you have a touch screen.
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 04:26 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by Tombs View Post
But boy do I miss that 'snap" feature in Windows 7! I find myself going to and from Win 7 regularly, mainly for work (Office etc...) and gaming as I cant find anything in the Apple world comparable to Business Contact Manager (suggestions welcome). Thats the great thing about the mac though, you can install Windows os and flit to it if need be.
Download and install BetterTouchTool http://blog.boastr.net

You can program in your own trackpad gestures and it also enables a snap feature, works pretty much the same as the Windows version. Plus the app is freeware
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 05:26 PM   #49
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I was a life long PC user, when I went to college my Toshiba satellite could not keep up with faster apple computers. I went to the Apple store and found a MBP (non retina) with good memory and more reliable than my PC (it spent weeks at Geek squad). I think you should look at online reviews and see what MB you like. Like others said go to the Apple store and talk to the experts (it's their job).
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Old Dec 14, 2012, 06:16 PM   #50
minnus
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Originally Posted by Essenar View Post
Sorry but you're mistaken. I'm a Windows 7 convert. That date night ruined was Windows 7 with its Recommended Settings. You clearly didn't read the post. The default setting for Windows 7 Updates is to install during shut down and to configure during restart.

And Windows 8 touchpad is a joke. In fact, Windows 8 is a joke unless you have a touch screen.
You're right about the update for Windows 7 - I apologize. I never use the "Recommended" (since recommended is not always in the best interest of the user) update settings as I always opt to install them manually. During manual installs, it will not restart your computer automatically. I've done this for so long, it led me to mistakenly believe that it no longer auto-restarted unless purposely configured to do so by an administrator.

In regards to Win8, I have to disagree. While the interface is optimized for a touchscreen, it is far from necessary. The reason why there are so many 'complaints' is because the change this time around is significant enough to cause shock and resistance. After a couple weeks, one can appreciate some of the design changes. Beyond the UI changes, it essentially behaves like Windows 7.
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