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Old Jan 16, 2013, 05:34 PM   #1
Huntn
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Anyone Use a Cordless Nailgun?

I'm remodeling and have a lot of baseboard to replace. In the past I used drill, hammer and nail. Usually pre-drilled holes so I was not splitting the molding. I thought gee, this would be perfect for a nail gun, but I don't have a compressor, don't want to buy a compressor so I was hoping for an electric/cordless model. Today I visited Home Depot and the best price for their battery powered model is $250. That's really more than I want to spend. A quick check at ebay shows refurbished Bostitch 15 Gauge Cordless Angled Finish Nailer GFN1564K-R for $209. I was hoping for $150 for a decent nailer, but that might not be realistic.

The speed and ease of popping nails into my baseboard with a gun seems like a whole bunch more fun than the old fashioned method. Any opinions appreciated.
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Old Jan 16, 2013, 05:38 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntn View Post
I'm remodeling and have a lot of baseboard to replace. In the past I used drill, hammer and nail. Usually pre-drilled holes so I was not splitting the molding. I thought gee, this would be perfect for a nail gun, but I don't have a compressor, don't want to buy a compressor so I was hoping for an electric/cordless model. Today I visited Home Depot and the best price for their battery powered model is $250. That's really more than I want to spend. A quick check at ebay shows refurbished Bostitch 15 Gauge Cordless Angled Finish Nailer GFN1564K-R for $209. I was hoping for $150 for a decent nailer, but that might not be realistic.

The speed and ease of popping nails into my baseboard with a gun seems like a whole bunch more fun than the old fashioned method. Any opinions appreciated.
If you're going to buy cordless or electric equipment - or any equipment really get it from Paslode or Bosch or DeWalt or Makita. That cheap $250 store brand nail gun is probably gonna kick the bucket real soon after purchase.

I have a Paslode Cordless Finishing nail gun, it works fine for rental property maintenance. It was $900NZD when i bought it.

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Old Jan 16, 2013, 05:43 PM   #3
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I've never tried a cordless nailgun, but I do use one with a Makita MAC 700 compressor for stuff I do around the house. My brother in law is a professional cabinet maker, he uses a compressor powered nailgun as well. I'll ask him what he thinks about a cordless one..
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 04:45 PM   #4
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My recommendation...



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Old Jan 17, 2013, 05:39 PM   #5
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My recommendation...

Image

Hey, dual barrel?

I wanted something inexpensive, suitable for homeowner use. I gave up on the battery powered one. I all most jumped on this ($80) but its reviews were bad:
Sears Evolv Combo


But then I settled for this, because of the higher capacity, higher horsepower compressor, and better reviews although it's more than twice as much. But that motto you get what you pay for hopefully applies :
Hitachi Combo ($220)

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Old Jan 17, 2013, 05:58 PM   #6
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Snoop uses one.
Here's a tutorial where she shows how to buy one:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N_UuImPL4E

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Old Jan 17, 2013, 06:52 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Huntn View Post
I'm remodeling and have a lot of baseboard to replace. In the past I used drill, hammer and nail. Usually pre-drilled holes so I was not splitting the molding. I thought gee, this would be perfect for a nail gun, but I don't have a compressor, don't want to buy a compressor so I was hoping for an electric/cordless model. Today I visited Home Depot and the best price for their battery powered model is $250. That's really more than I want to spend. A quick check at ebay shows refurbished Bostitch 15 Gauge Cordless Angled Finish Nailer GFN1564K-R for $209. I was hoping for $150 for a decent nailer, but that might not be realistic.

The speed and ease of popping nails into my baseboard with a gun seems like a whole bunch more fun than the old fashioned method. Any opinions appreciated.
You havent lived until youve fired one of these bad boys ( i know its major over kill on what you want to do)
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 11:54 PM   #8
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I think you're on the right track with a not-too-expensive pancake compressor kit like you've pictured. Don't buy the $50 Walmart or Harbor Freight special, but as you've discovered, going cordless properly isn't going to be cheap either.

The major advantage of a cordless nailgun is the fact that it's cordless (duh) which is useful if you're up on a rooftop or in an area where there's no power to run the compressor. It's also a little less hassle to take around because you don't also need to lug around the compressor, the hose, the electrical cable, etc.

However, you pay for those conveniences. You need to pay for consumable gas cartridges for the Paslode, or lug around batteries for electric units. These mechanisms cost a lot more and the whole unit is going to be much heavier as a result. The electric ones like the DeWalt are also slower to fire because they need to spin up a flywheel each time. And cordless units might not have the "oomph" to fully insert the fastener, especially if it's a longer fastener into a harder wood such as oak.

The compressor kit will be much better value and more versatile in the long run. In addition to the nailer it comes with, you can buy other nailers and staplers, as well as inflators for your car tires, beach balls, air mattresses, etc, and all kinds of other fun tools.
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Old Jan 18, 2013, 08:15 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by juanm View Post
Snoop uses one.
Here's a tutorial where she shows how to buy one:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N_UuImPL4E

I found that painful to watch. I don't know why but after watching this video it brought to mind, one of my favorite displays of using a nailgun in an unorthodox manner in The Island (Movie) when a nailgun was used to staple a bad guy's hand to door. Also found this interesting Movies Tagged With Nail Gun list.


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Originally Posted by bigMAC28 View Post
You havent lived until youve fired one of these bad boys ( i know its major over kill on what you want to do) Image
Holding power in your hands...

Quote:
Originally Posted by notjustjay View Post
I think you're on the right track with a not-too-expensive pancake compressor kit like you've pictured. Don't buy the $50 Walmart or Harbor Freight special, but as you've discovered, going cordless properly isn't going to be cheap either.

The major advantage of a cordless nailgun is the fact that it's cordless (duh) which is useful if you're up on a rooftop or in an area where there's no power to run the compressor. It's also a little less hassle to take around because you don't also need to lug around the compressor, the hose, the electrical cable, etc.

However, you pay for those conveniences. You need to pay for consumable gas cartridges for the Paslode, or lug around batteries for electric units. These mechanisms cost a lot more and the whole unit is going to be much heavier as a result. The electric ones like the DeWalt are also slower to fire because they need to spin up a flywheel each time. And cordless units might not have the "oomph" to fully insert the fastener, especially if it's a longer fastener into a harder wood such as oak.

The compressor kit will be much better value and more versatile in the long run. In addition to the nailer it comes with, you can buy other nailers and staplers, as well as inflators for your car tires, beach balls, air mattresses, etc, and all kinds of other fun tools.
I agree with your points. Batteries are expensive and the battery is just something else that can deteriorate. I believe the air driven mechanisms are simpler proven technology that will hold up better if it is sitting a year between uses.

After reading bad reviews on the $80 Sears model, as in, "the gun is a piece of junk", I decided to spend twice as much on the Hitachi model. I've installed several rooms of 6" baseboard molding in the past and when I started my project yesterday with the pre-drill, the accidental hammer marks on the molding, the nails that start bending half way in, and sinking them, I said enough and purchased the Hitachi unit. What irritates me is that I can't find this unit locally. It had to be ordered online so I'll see it the beginning of next week.
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Old Jan 18, 2013, 08:28 AM   #10
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I laid flooring in a family room and when installing the 1/4 round I used a hammer and nail. It was the most painful experience ever to be frank. The angle that you must nail the trim down is incredibly awkward. I tried both right and hand left hand application and wound up finding if I laid on the floor I had a slightly better angle. As you may know, you can't nail down trim into a floating floor because the floor needs to have a little wiggle room for expansion and shrinking.

When I laid the floor in my office I bought a cheap nail gun/compressor combo:
http://www.lowes.com/pd_103500-43657...eld&facetInfo=

It is honestly perfect for trim work. I can do my crown molding, the 1/4 round in the other room I plan to put new flooring in, and I'll likely use it for other trim work around the house. For the price I couldn't go wrong. Your Hitachi is cool. If I had seen that I would have likely bought that. In the end though, if the damn thing shot nails and did what I needed it to do, I was going to be happy. What took me well into an hour before took me 10 minutes with the nail gun. Not to mention, it's a seriously fun freaking tool to run around with.

Cordless nail guns are flat out expensive. I'm learning that the price point of certain tools is obviously geared towards people who use them daily. Where I'd like to buy a $500 miter saw, I'm going with a well-rated "lesser" brand because I won't be moving it to job sites and I won't be using it every day or even every weekend. You do get what you pay for but if you start to research and understand price points and who they're targeted to, you can save yourself some cash.

Not that I wouldn't love to drop a ton of cash on all the most awesome tools possible, but alas, I like to eat and I love electricity so I try to limit my spending on such things.
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Old Jan 18, 2013, 09:18 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by jessica. View Post
I laid flooring in a family room and when installing the 1/4 round I used a hammer and nail. It was the most painful experience ever to be frank. The angle that you must nail the trim down is incredibly awkward. I tried both right and hand left hand application and wound up finding if I laid on the floor I had a slightly better angle. As you may know, you can't nail down trim into a floating floor because the floor needs to have a little wiggle room for expansion and shrinking.

When I laid the floor in my office I bought a cheap nail gun/compressor combo:
http://www.lowes.com/pd_103500-43657...eld&facetInfo=

It is honestly perfect for trim work. I can do my crown molding, the 1/4 round in the other room I plan to put new flooring in, and I'll likely use it for other trim work around the house. For the price I couldn't go wrong. Your Hitachi is cool. If I had seen that I would have likely bought that. In the end though, if the damn thing shot nails and did what I needed it to do, I was going to be happy. What took me well into an hour before took me 10 minutes with the nail gun. Not to mention, it's a seriously fun freaking tool to run around with.

Cordless nail guns are flat out expensive. I'm learning that the price point of certain tools is obviously geared towards people who use them daily. Where I'd like to buy a $500 miter saw, I'm going with a well-rated "lesser" brand because I won't be moving it to job sites and I won't be using it every day or even every weekend. You do get what you pay for but if you start to research and understand price points and who they're targeted to, you can save yourself some cash.

Not that I wouldn't love to drop a ton of cash on all the most awesome tools possible, but alas, I like to eat and I love electricity so I try to limit my spending on such things.
I realize this is different than what you are talking about, but I remember when I put down a tongue and grove wood floor (not engineered), I rented a pneumatic floor nailer. It was a life saver. It allowed me to put the floor down in 2 days vs a week. Something like:

Thumb resize.
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Old Jan 19, 2013, 01:29 AM   #12
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Another question- are nailgun nails universal or must you stick with the manufacturer's brand of nails?
Thanks!
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Old Jan 19, 2013, 10:06 PM   #13
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Another question- are nailgun nails universal or must you stick with the manufacturer's brand of nails?
Thanks!
I don't think Hitachi makes nails specifically. I think you just need to ensure you use the right nails is all.
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Old Jan 20, 2013, 08:30 AM   #14
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I don't think Hitachi makes nails specifically. I think you just need to ensure you use the right nails is all.
Actually Hitachi does have branded nails, but thanks for the info! I'll check it out once I get the nailgun.
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Old Jan 20, 2013, 06:59 PM   #15
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Actually Hitachi does have branded nails, but thanks for the info! I'll check it out once I get the nailgun.
Don't worry, basic pin nails and fasteners are universal.

I have no experience with coil or stick-loading framing nailers; I expect those are standardized too, but don't know for sure. But since you're not building a roof, you're not using this type of nailer anyway...
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Old Jan 20, 2013, 10:47 PM   #16
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Don't worry, basic pin nails and fasteners are universal.

I have no experience with coil or stick-loading framing nailers; I expect those are standardized too, but don't know for sure. But since you're not building a roof, you're not using this type of nailer anyway...
The kit I purchased includes an 18 gauge brad nailer, and a 15 gauge finish nailer.
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Old Jan 21, 2013, 10:49 AM   #17
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The kit I purchased includes an 18 gauge brad nailer, and a 15 gauge finish nailer.
Those are pretty standard. Just be sure to buy the right length for your application and double check that the guns support that length (for example I own two nail guns that will do 18 gauge brads, but one of them will only go up to 1 1/4" while the other one can handle up to 2" long brads).

I was thinking in terms of the clipped-head framing nailers like in the picture someone posted a few posts back, I don't own one of those so I don't know how to buy nails for it, but I assume they are also standard. I have used one of those last fall -- a little bit scary but a lot of fun!
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Old Jan 21, 2013, 11:15 AM   #18
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I have used one of those last fall -- a little bit scary but a lot of fun!
Compared to the process of hammering nails into molding, mucho fun, pop pop.
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Old Jan 23, 2013, 03:34 PM   #19
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The Hitachi Combo kit I linked to in my first post, arrived today. No, it's not battery operated. It works like a champ! So much nicer than pounding nails with a hammer. One thing surprised me is that once the compressor gets up to it's target pressure, it cuts off for quite a while. I had in my mind that this relatively low cost compressor would have to run all the time because the nail gun would be using more pressure than it actually does. The compressure pressures up to about 130 psi, the 15 gauge finish nail gun needs 70 psi to operate. I'm happy I made this choice instead of going with the lesser Sears option.

The only concern I might have is that the part of the gun that holds nails is made out of plastic. Is that a concern? I don't plan on banging it around.

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Don't worry, basic pin nails and fasteners are universal.

I have no experience with coil or stick-loading framing nailers; I expect those are standardized too, but don't know for sure. But since you're not building a roof, you're not using this type of nailer anyway...
Of note, the Hitachi says only use Hitachi branded nails!! Hmm. I'll make a comparison to other brands to compare prices and see if there is any difference.
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Old Jan 24, 2013, 07:28 PM   #20
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I'm thinking "no", but does it hurt the compressor to leave it pressurized overnight while doing a project?
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Old Jan 24, 2013, 10:00 PM   #21
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I'm thinking "no", but does it hurt the compressor to leave it pressurized overnight while doing a project?
No. Even if you leave it pressurized, it will eventually, slowly, all leak out anyway. But if you know that you're not going to use the compressor for a while, it's good to purge the tank. Air has moisture in it and if you leave it in there the air will eventually escape but leave the moisture behind. It can start rusting out the tank from the inside. There should be a purge valve somewhere near the bottom of the tank that will let the air out and any accumulated water as well.

Enjoy your new tool!
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Old Jan 24, 2013, 10:43 PM   #22
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I've used a dewalt compressor/nail gun kit, I liked it alot!

I think there's a better value in a kit like that. You get a better nail gun, you spend less money, and you get a compressor that you can use for other stuff!

An electric nailgun might be nice for a contractor hauling tools to job sites, but for a homeowner doing their own work it's poorer performance for more money! I think you went a good route!

+1 to what the above poster said. I always purge my compressor when I'm done and remove/hang the hose. There is a LOT of moisture in that compressed air. Blow the air out on your hand with a blowgun or tire inflator sometime, especially on a cool day, and see how wet your hands get. That spells rust!

My DeWalt has a nice 'on/off' style purge valve instead of just a spring loaded one, so I just open it up and leave it open so moisture stays out, then just just close the valve and start it up when I want to use it!
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Old Jan 25, 2013, 09:20 AM   #23
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No. Even if you leave it pressurized, it will eventually, slowly, all leak out anyway. But if you know that you're not going to use the compressor for a while, it's good to purge the tank. Air has moisture in it and if you leave it in there the air will eventually escape but leave the moisture behind. It can start rusting out the tank from the inside. There should be a purge valve somewhere near the bottom of the tank that will let the air out and any accumulated water as well.

Enjoy your new tool!
For only pressurizing this unit two times I was amazed at how wet the air was when I purged the tank. And after it was empty, water dripped out. Thanks!

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I've used a dewalt compressor/nail gun kit, I liked it alot!

I think there's a better value in a kit like that. You get a better nail gun, you spend less money, and you get a compressor that you can use for other stuff!

An electric nailgun might be nice for a contractor hauling tools to job sites, but for a homeowner doing their own work it's poorer performance for more money! I think you went a good route!

+1 to what the above poster said. I always purge my compressor when I'm done and remove/hang the hose. There is a LOT of moisture in that compressed air. Blow the air out on your hand with a blowgun or tire inflator sometime, especially on a cool day, and see how wet your hands get. That spells rust!

My DeWalt has a nice 'on/off' style purge valve instead of just a spring loaded one, so I just open it up and leave it open so moisture stays out, then just just close the valve and start it up when I want to use it!
Just curious, how much did your kit cost? Mine was $220. It came with two guns, a 15 gauge finish nailer and an 18 gauge brad nailer. So far the guns work well. The compressor builds to 140psi, the manual says the guns need 70 psi to funtion, and I can shoot about 25 nails before it kicks back on. This Hitachi compressor has a turn purge valve, very easy to operate. My only concern would be that the parts of the gun that hold the nails appears to be made of plastic. I guess this might be an issue. How about the DeWalt guns?
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Last edited by Huntn; Jan 25, 2013 at 03:44 PM. Reason: Changed the number to 25
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Old Jan 25, 2013, 11:22 AM   #24
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IMO, consider a garage compressor as a long term investment.
Then, you can route a compressor hose indoors if needed for basement tool usage....heck for a simple weekend job rent a nail gun, or buy one if you see yourself as DIY type.

I bought the prior version of this 2-1 nail gun, works fine for staples and brad nails.
I've lent it to 3-4 guys at work and they all had good comments on using it.
http://www.craftsman.com/craftsman-2...Tools&prdNo=30


Yea - I've also got a Paslode Framing gun, the cordless no air is great.
I borrowed a air framing gun from a contractor friend initially, but he needed it back in 2 weeks so the Paslode was also a long term investment.
When I lend it out, people always buy me a extra cartridge and nails...I've got a good back-up supply that way


That easily paid for itself many times over as I used it to completely finish my basement in 2008, among other projects...
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Old Jan 25, 2013, 12:06 PM   #25
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IMO, consider a garage compressor as a long term investment.
Then, you can route a compressor hose indoors if needed for basement tool usage....heck for a simple weekend job rent a nail gun, or buy one if you see yourself as DIY type.

I bought the prior version of this 2-1 nail gun, works fine for staples and brad nails.
I've lent it to 3-4 guys at work and they all had good comments on using it.
http://www.craftsman.com/craftsman-2...Tools&prdNo=30
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Yea - I've also got a Paslode Framing gun, the cordless no air is great.
I borrowed a air framing gun from a contractor friend initially, but he needed it back in 2 weeks so the Paslode was also a long term investment.
When I lend it out, people always buy me a extra cartridge and nails...I've got a good back-up supply that way
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That easily paid for itself many times over as I used it to completely finish my basement in 2008, among other projects...
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For the Paslode, where is the battery? The ones I've seen in the store, the battery is at the end of the handle.
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