Go Back   MacRumors Forums > Apple Hardware > Desktops > Mac mini

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old May 7, 2013, 07:13 PM   #26
E.Lizardo
macrumors 65816
 
Join Date: May 2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulrbeers View Post
Did you even read the definition you provided here?

a : to decrease the flow of (as steam or fuel to an engine) by a valve
b : to regulate and especially to reduce the speed of (as an engine) by such means
c : to vary the thrust of (a rocket engine) during flight

Without a throttle ALL engines would run at FULL speed/RPM. There would be no restriction to the amount of fuel entering the engine which means your car (for example) would run at maximum RPM at all times. Now newer engines use fuel injectors, but those do not have a "throttle". Instead the injectors are turned off and off releasing fuel.

Don't give me the bull about how you meant a "rocket car", because that's baloney. What you found is the only way to even sorta prove you could on the fringe be right. The meaning of throttle is to restrict. A throttle is naturally in the off position almost completely restricting the flow of fuel. You have to force it out of its natural state in order to allow for an engine to increase in rpm. This is the normal and accepted definition. Some obscure definition for rocket engines it is not.

Again Turbo boost is the complete opposite of Throttle. I would recommend you take combustion engines 101 before you argue with me again on this. I'm going to assume you have never worked on a combustion engine of any type since you clearly do not understand the definition of Throttle.
a.You are getting a little to bent out of shape over this.Everyone knows what he meant.
B.You are wrong.
__________________
I'm sure you care what Apple gear I have about as much as I care about yours,so I won't bother putting it here.
E.Lizardo is offline   0
Old May 7, 2013, 07:50 PM   #27
paulrbeers
macrumors 68040
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by E.Lizardo View Post
a.You are getting a little to bent out of shape over this.Everyone knows what he meant.
B.You are wrong.
How am I wrong? A Throttle by definition slows an engine down. It's combustion engine 101. Prove me wrong! I am not wrong about this. Maybe I am getting bent out of shape, but he clearly doesn't know what Throttle means and is trying to use an obscure reference to Rockets to "prove his point"...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throttle

Quoting the above article at wikipedia: "The term throttle has come to refer, informally and incorrectly, to any mechanism by which the power or speed of an engine is regulated."

What is wrong, is that with today's engines being virtual impossible to repair by the average Joe has led to incorrect understandings of simple items like throttles.
__________________
rMBP 11,2 15" 2.0Ghz w/ 256GB SSD
MBA 6,2 13" 1.7Ghz w/ 256GB SSD
Mac Mini 6,2 2.3ghz w/ 240GB SSD + 1TB
Mac Pro 1,1 w/ 8 cores @ 2.66 w/ 240GB SSD
paulrbeers is online now   2
Old May 7, 2013, 08:39 PM   #28
opinio
macrumors 65816
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
I think someone here needs to be throttled. I would volunteer to do it but I am not sure what is the right way to throttle anymore.
opinio is offline   0
Old May 8, 2013, 01:38 AM   #29
Mr. Retrofire
macrumors 601
 
Mr. Retrofire's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: www.emiliana.cl
Quote:
Originally Posted by opinio View Post
So are you are saying all four cores can max out to 3.6 Ghz if the temp is ok?
Yes, this is what Turbo Boost >= 2.0 does.

Quote:
Originally Posted by opinio View Post
I think someone here needs to be throttled. I would volunteer to do it but I am not sure what is the right way to throttle anymore.
*lol*

;-)
__________________

“Only the dead have seen the end of the war.”
-- Plato --
Mr. Retrofire is offline   0
Old May 8, 2013, 02:33 PM   #30
fricotin
macrumors member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
When I open the Intel Power Gadget all I get is a window showing the processor speed and the processor power consumption, should I get something else as a previous photo indicates or is it only for the Windows machines ?
fricotin is offline   0
Old May 8, 2013, 04:04 PM   #31
opinio
macrumors 65816
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by fricotin View Post
When I open the Intel Power Gadget all I get is a window showing the processor speed and the processor power consumption, should I get something else as a previous photo indicates or is it only for the Windows machines ?
The image I put up also had the drop down window from the iStat Pro app showing my CPU cores maxed out.

So your intel gadget is correct. It only shows power and processor frequency speed.

IStat Pro does have a small price if you want to get it. It is the best few dollars I have spent on an app. Shows all temps, CPU usage (in a graph, not speed), ram usage and hard drive read/write speeds. I use it mainly for the last one. You can see the live read/write speeds on your fusion disks (both) and all other internal and external drives. It also gives you the history of the stats so you can see your CPU temp over a historical period say if you did some intensive video coding and wanted to see how hot the mac ran.
opinio is offline   0
Old May 8, 2013, 05:01 PM   #32
dyn
macrumors 65816
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: .nl
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulrbeers View Post
Did you even read the definition you provided here?
Yep and judging from your post you are the one not reading the given definitions.

Quote:
a : to decrease the flow of (as steam or fuel to an engine) by a valve
b : to regulate and especially to reduce the speed of (as an engine) by such means
c : to vary the thrust of (a rocket engine) during flight
If you actually read what it says it tells you that you can throttle up (generally open the valve) and down (generally closing the valve). If you read b and c there is even more emphasis on the part that it can go up and down. That's what words like "regulate" and "vary" mean!

Quote:
Without a throttle ALL engines would run at FULL speed/RPM. There would be no restriction to the amount of fuel entering the engine which means your car (for example) would run at maximum RPM at all times.
The way you are defining things means that it can be used only once. You can only turn down the throttle so when the throttle is completely turned down you need to buy a new engine. That's what you are saying here. Obviously you can open and close the valve as one of the definitions says as well as some of the others. You are taking the wording very very literally. This is not how it works with CPUs.

Quote:
The meaning of throttle is to restrict.
No it's only one of the meanings as dictionaries like Merriam Webster already point out. See below.

Quote:
Again Turbo boost is the complete opposite of Throttle. I would recommend you take combustion engines 101 before you argue with me again on this. I'm going to assume you have never worked on a combustion engine of any type since you clearly do not understand the definition of Throttle.
Again Turbo Boost is exactly throttling because it varies/controls/regulates the speed of the processor as defined in many dictionaries of the English language. Not only is this basic English, it is also basic computer science. Engines are not computers, they work differently so comparing them is very silly.

In this case the meaning is different from what you are used to with combustion engines. Throttling in computers means to control/vary/regulate, there is no emphasis on limiting. Throttling network traffic however works exactly they way you are used to: it's about limiting bandwidth to make sure other things keep on working properly. With CPUs it is aimed at giving you the power that is needed. The entire idea is that the CPU is being used as efficiently as possible, it is not meant to limit (this is very important to understand). The fact that you can save some power and reduce heat is only an added bonus, there is absolutely no guarantee you'll save power and reduce heat (tasks that require lots of computing power will still make things hot and drain power). Some interesting articles on the matter: CPU throttling & network bandwidth throttling.

TL;DR: look up the words "vary", "regulate" and "control" in the dictionary and read into how a CPU controls its speed. A CPU does not work exactly the same as a combustion engine.
dyn is offline   0
Old May 17, 2013, 08:15 PM   #33
brand
macrumors 68040
 
brand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: 127.0.0.1
Quote:
Originally Posted by paulrbeers View Post
How am I wrong? A Throttle by definition slows an engine down. It's combustion engine 101. Prove me wrong! I am not wrong about this. Maybe I am getting bent out of shape, but he clearly doesn't know what Throttle means and is trying to use an obscure reference to Rockets to "prove his point"...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Throttle

Quoting the above article at wikipedia: "The term throttle has come to refer, informally and incorrectly, to any mechanism by which the power or speed of an engine is regulated."

What is wrong, is that with today's engines being virtual impossible to repair by the average Joe has led to incorrect understandings of simple items like throttles.
For what its worth, your not wrong.
brand is offline   1
Old May 18, 2013, 08:13 AM   #34
SandboxGeneral
Moderator
 
SandboxGeneral's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Rigel IV
Moderator note:

There is too much bickering going on in this thread.

Closed

/Moderator note
__________________
It's true, we are aliens. But what are you going to do about it? It's a two-party system. You have to vote for one of us.
••• SandboxGeneral.com •••
SandboxGeneral is online now   1

Closed Thread
MacRumors Forums > Apple Hardware > Desktops > Mac mini

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Similar Threads
thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is there any way to know when I am using Turbo Boost? Hieveryone MacBook Pro 5 May 11, 2014 08:47 PM
What is Turbo Boost? Felasco MacBook Air 12 Mar 20, 2014 07:00 AM
Turbo Boost? Benk3350 MacBook Pro 4 Oct 31, 2013 01:33 AM
Turbo boost etsi Mac mini 6 Aug 14, 2012 07:14 AM
What does Turbo Boost do? TomMaxwell MacBook Air 13 Jun 21, 2012 08:57 PM

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:29 AM.

Mac Rumors | Mac | iPhone | iPhone Game Reviews | iPhone Apps

Mobile Version | Fixed | Fluid | Fluid HD
Copyright 2002-2013, MacRumors.com, LLC