Register FAQ / Rules Forum Spy Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Go Back   MacRumors Forums > Mac Community > Community Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old Jun 11, 2014, 02:15 PM   #476
Renzatic
macrumors 604
 
Renzatic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Who puts the washers in the woods?
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheAppleFairy View Post
I agree it's not something you suffer with, but hopefully some day they will be able to fix color blindness and I think the day color blind people see all the colors for the first time they will be simply amazed at the colors around them.
I think it could be done, but you gotta think about the psychological effect of suddenly being able to see more colors. It'd be like us waking up and realizing we can see in ultraviolet and infrared. Yeah, you'd think it'd be neat, but then you realize everyone has weird purple blotches all over their bodies, their veins are stark, jet black roads crossing across their skin, plants and flowers look all glowly and weird...and...no, you probably wouldn't like it. It's not how you're used to seeing the world.

That's one thing I've noticed from looking at those colorblind sim pictures in the link above. I can see 6 distinct colors and various shades of those 6 colors in that one bush in the center of the picture. The colorblind shots? Just two, and a couple of shades off that. And green. It seems that no one with any form of distinct colorblindness can see green. With duteranopia and protanopia, it's a yellowish brown color, with tritanopia, it's a desaturated teal, just a couple steps above grey. Unless you live out in the desert or way up north, green is THE most common color around outside. Grass, trees, leaves, flowers. They've all got some shade of green in them.

To us, it's normal. Green is a pretty color, and you kinda feel sorry for people who aren't able to see it. It's the color of living, thriving things. Everything looks so much better in the summer because it's all green, rather than drab and yellow.

But from their perspective, imagine waking up one day and realizing the entire world looks completely different and alien to how you're used to. Even the colors they are able to see will take on different hues, and become more bold. It'd probably freak them right slap the hell out, and they'd hate it.

Plus, you have to consider all the extra visual noise they'll be faced with. That's the other thing I've noticed from looking at those shots. While you can't differentiate nearly as many things by color, there seems to be a little more contrast to everything, and you're able to pick out organic shapes a little easier. This is coming from someone who's had perfect color vision his entire life. Someone suddenly gaining the ability to see hundreds of thousands of more colors will find it all a random splurtch of weird.

While you won't say it's something we shouldn't work towards, I don't think it'd be the sudden revelation for colorblind people we think it is. There's a lot of psychology and mental processing behind something as simple as color.
Renzatic is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jun 11, 2014, 03:31 PM   #477
Doctor Q
Thread Starter
Administrator
 
Doctor Q's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Los Angeles
I have defective red vision. From what you say, Renzatic, I may be better off than people with defective green vision, given all the green life in the world. On the other hand, live green plants and dead brown plants look the same to me. I feel a bit left out when people are oohing and aahing over a tree with red colors in the Fall and I can't tell which tree they are admiring, nor appreciate it.

If I could suddenly see red, I might be totally confused and disoriented, in the ways you describe. Then again, perhaps I'd soon adapt the way George Stratton did. Another possibility is that my brain would simply filter out the new information to keep my world view the same, so I'd still be colorblind despite the physical problem being solved. My guess, without any proof, is that everything would look oddly tinted, over-saturated, and fake to me, but that I'd get used to it, like watching a mis-adjusted TV.

I'm used to asking for help when I need it (my wife makes sure my clothes match) and the inconveniences are all manageable, much like the problems for left-handed people living in a right-handed world. On my Mac I'm lousy with color pickers but I can choose colors by name, by numeric values, using utility apps, or by copying and pasting known colors. I've even learned to do photo color correction by knowing which types of corrections I can safely make and which I need to avoid. As with any long-term disadvantage, you adapt and get very used to it.
__________________
Oh do pay attention 007. In the wrong hands, this 12-core Mac Pro with three 4K displays, FirePro graphics, and Thunderbolt 2 could be very dangerous.
Doctor Q is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jun 11, 2014, 05:04 PM   #478
Renzatic
macrumors 604
 
Renzatic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Who puts the washers in the woods?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor Q View Post
If I could suddenly see red, I might be totally confused and disoriented, in the ways you describe. Then again, perhaps I'd soon adapt the way George Stratton did. Another possibility is that my brain would simply filter out the new information to keep my world view the same, so I'd still be colorblind despite the physical problem being solved. My guess, without any proof, is that everything would look oddly tinted, over-saturated, and fake to me, but that I'd get used to it, like watching a mis-adjusted TV.
Were the proper cones restored, I think you'd be able to see and and acknowledge red, and yeah, you would eventually get to it. The human break is incredibly elastic, and has shown that it'll readily accept and adapt to any new signal it receives. Case in point, it seems to be a new thing in neuroscience to call humans blocked tetrachromats rather than trichromats, because our eyes are apparently equipped to see into the ultraviolet spectrum, but the lens covering the eye blocks almost all UV wavelengths. Talk to someone who's had their lenses removed through surgery though, and they'll talk about seeing this strange whitish purple color everywhere. Even though none of us have ever seen UV unassisted beforehand, the moment our eye is able to detect it, our brains were able to decipher it.

So I think were it to happen, you'd be able to see and see red, and you'd adapt quickly from a physiological standpoint. Psychologically though, it'd probably take you a little while longer to deal with. I just got through walking downstairs to grab a drink while typing this, and I came to realize that indoor lighting, and thus anything being directly or indirectly lit by it, has an orange reddish tint to it. People, too, would look strange to you for awhile. Everyone in the world, no matter their color or shade, have a light pink to dark reddish tint to their skin. If you can't see red at all, then that means people probably appear a sort of greyish-green to you. Perfectly normal from your perspective, but kinda weird from mine. If reds were suddenly restored to you, everything and everyone would probably weird you out a bit. You're going from a situation where you've seen the world one way for however many years you've been alive, to suddenly seeing it completely differently. Though I'm far from being an expert in cognition, I think it'd take you a little while before everything starts feeling like "home" again.

Much the same way if I woke up tomorrow and found out I lost my reds. It wouldn't drive me insane or anything (well, beyond that initial freak out, anyway), but until I adjusted, I'd think everything looks strange.
Renzatic is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jun 18, 2014, 09:10 AM   #479
briannaharbor
macrumors member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Since those with colorblindness cannot see the vibrancy of some colors, I wonder if there is a higher level of depression among those who are colorblind. Anyone know anything about this?
I know that we've declared it to not be something that people "suffer" but, i wonder if there is a correlation here.
briannaharbor is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Jun 18, 2014, 06:18 PM   #480
Doctor Q
Thread Starter
Administrator
 
Doctor Q's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Los Angeles
Quote:
Originally Posted by briannaharbor View Post
Since those with colorblindness cannot see the vibrancy of some colors, I wonder if there is a higher level of depression among those who are colorblind. Anyone know anything about this?
I know that we've declared it to not be something that people "suffer" but, i wonder if there is a correlation here.
What an interesting question! It could be the case.

A study from 2009 found that depression correlates with reduced ability to see contrast. That doesn't prove cause and effect, but it's easy to speculate that it does. The first test I'd do to research this would be to study the rates of depression among people with monochromacy (complete lack of color vision) compared with the rest of the population.

There may be a difference in psychological effects between those who were born color blind and those who became color blind after previously seeing the full spectrum, since the latter would be more aware of what they were missing.

Some people gradually lose their color differentiation abilities as they age, but if seniors become depressed there are many other suspects as to the cause!
__________________
Oh do pay attention 007. In the wrong hands, this 12-core Mac Pro with three 4K displays, FirePro graphics, and Thunderbolt 2 could be very dangerous.
Doctor Q is offline   0 Reply With Quote


Reply
MacRumors Forums > Mac Community > Community Discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Similar Threads
thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Am I Retina Blind? CrashX Wasteland 36 May 1, 2014 04:40 AM
I'm a blind photographer! :-( mickimac Digital Photography 13 Feb 7, 2013 08:03 AM
Am I going blind? Morrile MacBook Pro 3 Jun 14, 2012 04:38 AM

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:50 AM.

Mac Rumors | Mac | iPhone | iPhone Game Reviews | iPhone Apps

Mobile Version | Fixed | Fluid | Fluid HD
Copyright 2002-2013, MacRumors.com, LLC