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Old Jan 31, 2015, 12:27 PM   #226
aaronvan
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Jefferson's is very good bourbon.
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Old Jan 31, 2015, 01:08 PM   #227
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Jefferson's is very good bourbon.
Spectacular, some of my favorite!
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 05:18 AM   #228
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I'm easy to please Jim Beam or Bushmills I'll pass on the rest as they are too smooth or too sweet.
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 07:30 AM   #229
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I'm easy to please Jim Beam or Bushmills I'll pass on the rest as they are too smooth or too sweet.
'Too sweet' I can understand as a complaint, (because sweetness needs to be balanced and tempered with some degree of acidity, or sharpness to work successfully), but to offer 'too smooth' as a reason for rejection?

Ah, sad to say, there we must part ways. To my palate, when sipping whiskey (or cognac) there is no such thing as 'too smooth' - 'smooth' is what I savour, treasure and seek out in whiskies.
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 10:11 AM   #230
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Jefferson's is very good bourbon.
I'll look for it.

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Originally Posted by lowendlinux View Post
I'm easy to please Jim Beam or Bushmills I'll pass on the rest as they are too smooth or too sweet.
Jim Beam Black Label was the first whiskey I tried and at the time thought it was harsh to my tender taste buds. However now that I'm more experienced, I intend to go back and try it again.

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Originally Posted by Scepticalscribe View Post
'Too sweet' I can understand as a complaint, (because sweetness needs to be balanced and tempered with some degree of acidity, or sharpness to work successfully), but to offer 'too smooth' as a reason for rejection?

Ah, sad to say, there we must part ways. To my palate, when sipping whiskey (or cognac) there is no such thing as 'too smooth' - 'smooth' is what I savour, treasure and seek out in whiskies.
Interesting point. We may have some semantics variances at play in this discussion.

When I first started drinking whiskey my impression would be the smoothest whiskey would be the best because I wanted that whiskey flavor, but not the sensation to my unpracticed taste buds of harsh spirits which provided a sensation which I imagined might be like drinking turpentine. As I've become more experienced and acclimated to whiskeys, I found a very smooth/tame variety called Benchmark No.8 but it arrived as a subtle one note, relatively boring experience along the lines of drinking whiskey flavored water. Since then I've also tried very Old Barton which is on the subtle side, but with a more complex taste than Benchmark. To my surprise, I find I prefer some burn, a little flavor eruption with some oomph, which I would also describe as the opposite of smooth. Would you agree that smooth is the opposite of burn, or am I describing something else?

Is this sensation associated with alcohol proof? Probably. The smooth whiskey I described is 80 proof, however I'm in possession of some good 86 proof whiskey Evan Williams and probably the best whiskey I've had is 101 proof Wild Turkey which possesses a good flavor accompanied by an acceptable burn.
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 10:46 AM   #231
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I'll look for it.



Jim Beam Black Label was the first whiskey I tried and at the time thought it was harsh to my tender taste buds. However now that I'm more experienced, I intend to go back and try it again.



Interesting point. We may have some semantics variances at play in this discussion.

When I first started drinking whiskey my impression would be the smoothest whiskey would be the best because I wanted that whiskey flavor, but not the sensation to my unpracticed taste buds of harsh spirits which provided a sensation which I imagined might be like drinking turpentine. As I've become more experienced and acclimated to whiskeys, I found a very smooth/tame variety called Benchmark No.8 but it arrived as a subtle one note, relatively boring experience along the lines of drinking whiskey flavored water. Since then I've also tried very Old Barton which is on the subtle side, but with a more complex taste than Benchmark. To my surprise, I find I prefer some burn, a little flavor eruption with some oomph, which I would also describe as the opposite of smooth. Would you agree that smooth is the opposite of burn, or am I describing something else?

Is this sensation associated with alcohol proof? Probably. The smooth whiskey I described is 80 proof, however I'm in possession of some good 86 proof whiskey Evan Williams and probably the best whiskey I've had is 101 proof Wild Turkey which possesses a good flavor accompanied by an acceptable burn.
Thanks for your response; actually, I don't like 'burn', or sharpness, - at all in whiskies or cognac - but I do like 'smooth', or, perhaps a better way of describing it would be 'mellow'.

However, I have noticed that there is s co-relation with 'mellowness', (and 'smoothness') and age (and indeed, price, come to think of it). For my part, I really don't much care for either whiskies or cognacs that are under 12 years old, - they are much too sharp, and are like a mouthful of piant-stripper, the alcoholic burn is so strong - and much prefer 14, or 18 to 20 year old, to 12 year olds. To my mind, that ageing process allows for a 'smooth', i.e. 'mellow' sensation, but also for a richly textured balance of flavours to be savoured and sipped.

However, each to their own, and long may you enjoy your 'burning' sensation; indeed, what truly matters here is how each person enjoys their whiskey.
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 11:22 AM   #232
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Originally Posted by Scepticalscribe View Post
Thanks for your response; actually, I don't like 'burn', or sharpness, - at all in whiskies or cognac - but I do like 'smooth', or, perhaps a better way of describing it would be 'mellow'.

However, I have noticed that there is s co-relation with 'mellowness', (and 'smoothness') and age (and indeed, price, come to think of it). For my part, I really don't much care for either whiskies or cognacs that are under 12 years old, - they are much too sharp, and are like a mouthful of piant-stripper, the alcoholic burn is so strong - and much prefer 14, or 18 to 20 year old, to 12 year olds. To my mind, that ageing process allows for a 'smooth', i.e. 'mellow' sensation, but also for a richly textured balance of flavours to be savoured and sipped.

However, each to their own, and long may you enjoy your 'burning' sensation; indeed, what truly matters here is how each person enjoys their whiskey.
There might be the problem, I have practically no experience with top shelf whiskeys, and reallty don't want to pick up a $40+ a bottle whiskey drinking habit, but that is not a rebuff of your opinion, just an observation.

And I'm not promoting "the burn". I'm saying in the realm of whiskey drinking where I'm swimming, of the most appealing whiskeys I've tried, the smoothest (not sure this is the best term?) were not the most appealing, which is not to imply there can be no stellar smooth whiskeys. So far, the best tasting had some burn, but did not overpower the positives.
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 11:42 AM   #233
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There might be the problem, I have practically no experience with top shelf whiskeys, and reallty don't want to pick up a $40+ a bottle whiskey drinking habit, but that is not a rebuff of your opinion, just an observation.

And I'm not promoting "the burn". I'm saying in the realm of whiskey drinking where I'm swimming, of the most appealing whiskeys I've tried, the smoothest (not sure this is the best term?) were not the most appealing, which is not to imply there can be no stellar smooth whiskeys. So far, the best tasting had some burn, but did not overpower the positives.
A few years ago, I spent over two years in Georgia (Caucasus Georgia) where they have an ancient tradition of wine and cognac making, a tradition that seems to be at least a few thousand years old.

To be honest, until I went to Georgia, I was not much of a spirit drinker, while I do like good quality wines and beers.

Perhaps it is simply a question of age - I have discovered a preference for quality over quantity as I get older; perhaps it is holding down better jobs, and thus, having more by way of disposable income; perhaps, it is a more discerning palate (I shudder when I recall some of the stuff I happily poured down my throat in my student days), as I realise that I really do prefer the really good (and, also, alas, expensive) stuff, and will forego the lesser stuff in order to sample the good stuff…….but, for obvious reasons of economy, will consume them a lot less often.

In any case, in Georgia, the price of their locally produced cognac was very affordable to those of us on decent western incomes. Some of my colleagues drank the six and seven year old cognac, which, to be frank, was akin to pure paint-stripper, a ghastly burning liquid, but it was extraordinarily cheap.

As a farewell gift, a colleague managed to unearth a small bottle of some legendary 30 year old Armenian cognac for me - stuff that had been made before the collapse of the old USSR, and (because of war, strife, civil war, conflict and sheer instability) had not been made since…..

For the equivalent of around €50, it was possible to drink Georgian XO cognac (i.e. cognac that was 20 years old) and I developed a taste for that. It just tastes an awful lot better, smoother, richer, more elegant, more luscious……

More recently, on another posting elsewhere, as I had never liked the whiskies we drank as students, I developed an occasional taste for the extremely good, aged, smooth, mellow, Scotch whiskies, these singular malts from strange sounding Scottish places. Some of those 14 year olds (and 18 year olds, and 20 year olds) were excellent.
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 12:15 PM   #234
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A few years ago, I spent over two years in Georgia (Caucasus Georgia) where they have an ancient tradition of wine and cognac making, a tradition that seems to be at least a few thousand years old.

To be honest, until I went to Georgia, I was not much of a spirit drinker, while I do like good quality wines and beers.

Perhaps it is simply a question of age - I have discovered a preference for quality over quantity as I get older; perhaps it is holding down better jobs, and thus, having more by way of disposable income; perhaps, it is a more discerning palate (I shudder when I recall some of the stuff I happily poured down my throat in my student days), as I realise that I really do prefer the really good (and, also, alas, expensive) stuff, and will forego the lesser stuff in order to sample the good stuff…….but, for obvious reasons of economy, will consume them a lot less often.

In any case, in Georgia, the price of their locally produced cognac was very affordable to those of us on decent western incomes. Some of my colleagues drank the six and seven year old cognac, which, to be frank, was akin to pure paint-stripper, a ghastly burning liquid, but it was extraordinarily cheap.

As a farewell gift, a colleague managed to unearth a small bottle of some legendary 30 year old Armenian cognac for me - stuff that had been made before the collapse of the old USSR, and (because of war, strife, civil war, conflict and sheer instability) had not been made since…..

For the equivalent of around €50, it was possible to drink Georgian XO cognac (i.e. cognac that was 20 years old) and I developed a taste for that. It just tastes an awful lot better, smoother, richer, more elegant, more luscious……

More recently, on another posting elsewhere, as I had never liked the whiskies we drank as students, I developed an occasional taste for the extremely good, aged, smooth, mellow, Scotch whiskies, these singular malts from strange sounding Scottish places. Some of those 14 year olds (and 18 year olds, and 20 year olds) were excellent.
I've tried 4 and 6 year, maybe even an 8 year whiskey. Maybe I should try a 12 or 14 year whiskey (if I can bring myself to pay for it) and see if it knocks my socks off (with goodness).
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 12:28 PM   #235
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Balvenie Caribbean Cask. Aged in rum casks; very lovely rummy undertones.

Macallan cask strength. Because awesome.
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 12:30 PM   #236
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I've tried 4 and 6 year, maybe even an 8 year whiskey. Maybe I should try a 12 or 14 year whiskey (if I can bring myself to pay for it) and see if it knocks my socks off (with goodness).
The problem with my preference for XO (twenty year old) cognac, is that while the Georgian versions are around €50 (or a little more if you buy them in the old 'Soviet' world), and their Armenian equivalents (the best that could be obtained in the former Soviet world) cook in at around €80 (for XO cognac), the standard French XO cognacs are around €200.

However, when drinking cognac abroad, I developed a taste for this type of cognac, and would find it very hard to try anything else. You can become too used to the good things.

While I have bought these at duty free airports, since my return home, these have become rare - as in very occasional - pleasures.

What I will recommend is that - if opportunity arises, or presents itself - that you sample the good stuff. Sip it, savour it. You will be surprised at the difference.

At a farewell dinner in Georgia, that I hosted, three of my colleagues - knowing my preferences in such matters - produced a bottle of XO cognac which they had clubbed together to buy as a farewell gift. I will say that I was hugely touched by their kind and thoughtful gesture.


----------

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Balvenie Caribbean Cask. Aged in rum casks; very lovely rummy undertones.

Macallan cask strength. Because awesome.
Very good stuff; excellent choices. Actually, rum cask ageing lends a lovely lusciousness to a good whisky.
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 02:14 PM   #237
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I've tried 4 and 6 year, maybe even an 8 year whiskey. Maybe I should try a 12 or 14 year whiskey (if I can bring myself to pay for it) and see if it knocks my socks off (with goodness).
it was mentioned earlier but you can find "airline" sized bottles of some "better" brands of whiskey at many large liquor stores.....they're a reasonable way to sample what you would otherwise resist buying due to the price
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 02:19 PM   #238
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Currently drinking a Bruichladdich Organic Scottish Barley and a Talisker Dark Storm, love the Bruichladdich, and the Talisker was a pleasant surprise (not a big fan of their regular bottlings)

But here's a small list of whiskys I really like:

Glenmorangie Quinta Ruban (Aged in Port Casks, very very nice)
Kilchomann Machir Bay (a really classic taste, it's got peat, but it won't take your face off with it)
Lagavulin 16 (might just take your face off with the peat)
Glenfarclas 15


Ones I badly want to try:
Glenmorangie Ealanta
Ardbeg Uigeadail
anCnoc 12
Bruichladdich Port Charlotte PC11


PS: I see most of the espresso drinking thread folk here too! Glad to find others with deep interests in caffeine AND whisky!
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 02:29 PM   #239
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Currently drinking a Bruichladdich Organic Scottish Barley and a Talisker Dark Storm, love the Bruichladdich, and the Talisker was a pleasant surprise (not a big fan of their regular bottlings)

But here's a small list of whiskys I really like:

Glenmorangie Quinta Ruban (Aged in Port Casks, very very nice)
Kilchomann Machir Bay (a really classic taste, it's got peat, but it won't take your face off with it)
Lagavulin 16 (might just take your face off with the peat)
Glenfarclas 15


Ones I badly want to try:
Glenmorangie Ealanta
Ardbeg Uigeadail
anCnoc 12
Bruichladdich Port Charlotte PC11
Some excellent scotch here! I've been wanting to try the Talisker Dark Storm for a while now...

Quote:
PS: I see most of the espresso drinking thread folk here too! Glad to find others with deep interests in caffeine AND whisky!
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 02:50 PM   #240
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Currently drinking a Bruichladdich Organic Scottish Barley and a Talisker Dark Storm, love the Bruichladdich, and the Talisker was a pleasant surprise (not a big fan of their regular bottlings)

But here's a small list of whiskys I really like:

Glenmorangie Quinta Ruban (Aged in Port Casks, very very nice)
Kilchomann Machir Bay (a really classic taste, it's got peat, but it won't take your face off with it)
Lagavulin 16 (might just take your face off with the peat)
Glenfarclas 15


Ones I badly want to try:
Glenmorangie Ealanta
Ardbeg Uigeadail
anCnoc 12
Bruichladdich Port Charlotte PC11


PS: I see most of the espresso drinking thread folk here too! Glad to find others with deep interests in caffeine AND whisky!
Ah, yes, glad to see that you seem to have spotted that; this is because we espresso aficionados tend to show up in places where our excellent taste, easy companionship and discerning palate might be in demand……

And, may I add that you have set out for our perusal a most impressive selection of quite marvellous and rather delectable whiskies……….
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 05:37 PM   #241
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it was mentioned earlier but you can find "airline" sized bottles of some "better" brands of whiskey at many large liquor stores.....they're a reasonable way to sample what you would otherwise resist buying due to the price
I am aware. I tried the Jack Daniels like that. Thanks!
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Old Feb 1, 2015, 07:44 PM   #242
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I drank so much Jack Daniels (and Yukon Jack too) in college I can't stand it today. I recently tried some Single Barrel and still can't stomach it. But I still sent a bottle back to China for a New Year gift. It's not so common there.

I'll stick with gin.
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