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Old Jan 17, 2013, 10:44 AM   #26
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So what does a data cap do to prevent peak hours?
It prevents peak hours in that people are less likely to download more throughout the month so as to stay under their data cap. Sure if there's a super important event on a single evening people will likely congest the network to watch live streams, keep up on twitter, post things to Facebook... Just like a road would get over congested for a football game. But on normal days it discourages overuse.
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 11:15 AM   #27
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It prevents peak hours in that people are less likely to download more throughout the month so as to stay under their data cap.Sure if there's a super important event on a single evening people will likely congest the network to watch live streams, keep up on twitter, post things to Facebook... Just like a road would get over congested for a football game. But on normal days it discourages overuse.
Proof?
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 11:34 AM   #28
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Proof?
Proof of what? That if you have to pay more for a certain service once you meet a threshold you will attempt to limit your usage of the service to avoid those charges? Like every cell phone plan with a set amount of minutes?
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 11:37 AM   #29
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Proof of what? That if you have to pay more for a certain service once you meet a threshold you will attempt to limit your usage of the service to avoid those charges? Like every cell phone plan with a set amount of minutes?
Let's clarify something.

When you speak of data caps, you know that is a hard cap on data right, like 20 gbs per month, and NOT your download speed, right?

So when you say "It prevents peak hours in that people are less likely to download more throughout the month so as to stay under their data cap.Sure if there's a super important event on a single evening people will likely congest the network "

you recognize that is not a data cap issue, but a bandwidth issue?

If you still insist, I would be very interested to see a study that data caps prevent peak-time usage, because too my knowledge no such relationship has been proven to exist.
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 11:50 AM   #30
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If you still insist, I would be very interested to see a study that data caps prevent peak-time usage, because too my knowledge no such relationship has been proven to exist.
I still don't understand what you wrote so maybe we're talking apples and oranges as they say.

To me, a data cap is "You can download x amount of data a month and any data past that your bandwidth will be throttled down and/or you will end up paying so much money per unit of data that exceeds your plan." So you can exceed the cap at a cost of lowered bandwidth or at an additional cost past the amount you paid to consume monthly.

There's also the reality of the amount of data that can be sent from the CO to your house and those in your neighborhood. That is the bandwidth throttle many on cable modems see in the evenings as that network becomes congested.

I'm speaking of the first kind of cap that is contractual.

The contractual data cap assists the congestion because I will be more likely to be more choosy as to what I download during the month. I personally don't have a data cap and have fast internet speeds. So instead of storing my games on my hard drive and never deleting them, I just keep a few installed because if I need another I'll just go download it again from Steam. If I had a data cap I would be more likely to download them once and keep them locally so as not to hit my data cap.

Roads obviously don't have data caps. But they can institute higher tolls at various times throughout the day to discourage use of those roads. In my opinion (I have no proof), a monthly bandwidth cap can help reduce daily load on the servers. Just like a higher toll at various hours can reduce load on the road. It is not a perfect analogy but very few are.
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 11:56 AM   #31
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I still don't understand what you wrote so maybe we're talking apples and oranges as they say.

To me, a data cap is "You can download x amount of data a month and any data past that your bandwidth will be throttled down and/or you will end up paying so much money per unit of data that exceeds your plan." So you can exceed the cap at a cost of lowered bandwidth or at an additional cost past the amount you paid to consume monthly.
Ok. So what is the relationship between this and peak hours?

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There's also the reality of the amount of data that can be sent from the CO to your house and those in your neighborhood. That is the bandwidth throttle many on cable modems see in the evenings as that network becomes congested.
Right, but how does a data cap help solve this problem? I mean, let's say that there is a 20gb data cap for the week (yes I know it's monthly, but for sake of ease bear with me). And let's say peak hours are mon-fri 6-10pm.

What if I save all of my data cap space and use it exactly during peak hours?

Do you see what I mean? How does what you mentioned alleviate this?

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I'm speaking of the first kind of cap that is contractual.

The contractual data cap assists the congestion because I will be more likely to be more choosy as to what I download during the month. I personally don't have a data cap and have fast internet speeds. So instead of storing my games on my hard drive and never deleting them, I just keep a few installed because if I need another I'll just go download it again from Steam. If I had a data cap I would be more likely to download them once and keep them locally so as not to hit my data cap.

Roads obviously don't have data caps. But they can institute higher tolls at various times throughout the day to discourage use of those roads. In my opinion (I have no proof), a monthly bandwidth cap can help reduce daily load on the servers. Just like a higher toll at various hours can reduce load on the road. It is not a perfect analogy but very few are.
That's all fine and dandy, but what the problem here is, is that the service providers either own, or will come into contract with media companies. So whta will happen is that (they have tons of excess bandwidth and what-not mind you) they will charge against your data cap using a service they don't control, such as iTunes, whereas they won't charge against your data cap to use their own service, or their partners.

Does that make sense? The problem is that the Netflix, Amazon, and Apple's of the world are squeezed out by content providers by limiting access to these services.
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 12:01 PM   #32
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Meh. Comcast has removed data caps until further notice as a result of many people streaming media through Netflix, Vudu, etc.

I think their relaxed approach at looking over the situation for a while is much more customer friendly.
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 12:01 PM   #33
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The problem is that the Netflix, Amazon, and Apple's of the world are squeezed out by content providers by limiting access to these services.
I've met my level for the other discussion. I agree that this part is an issue. That's why I made this thread. I am okay with data caps so long as it treats all data the same. It still think data caps are probably dumb, but I am for net neutrality.
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 01:27 PM   #34
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They don't throttle unless you aren't paying extra. If they get their extra charges in they will let you use as much as you want. Canada has one of the worst competitive markets when it comes to internet and cell.
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Old Jan 17, 2013, 04:51 PM   #35
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Roads obviously don't have data caps. But they can institute higher tolls at various times throughout the day to discourage use of those roads.
The problem with the road analogy is US 12, for example. If I need to get from Gary to Kenosha, I can take 12 to 41 instead of the toll roads. That would go through a bunch of stoplights and impose lower speed limits, but ultimately, during the day, the cost in travel time is negligible. By comparison, if my data plan is AT&T, there is no alternate route, I must get my data through their network and agree to their terms. In some parts of the country, there is only one provider, so there is no competition. Where I live, I can only get dsl at home through one provider, if that company chooses to limit what I can reach, or impose a surcharge, what recourse do I have?
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Old Jan 18, 2013, 10:34 PM   #36
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Speaking purely from a mobile data standpoint, I understand data caps. Don't like them, think they're a $ grab and by and large unnecessary 99% of the time. But, if these providers are going to cap the data, why oppose a way to soften the cap for consumers? These partnerships could help consumers, not harm them. I don't see how it's anticompetitive compared to any other benefit that comes with corporate partnerships. I'm thinking reward programs, exclusive contents, prime programming and the like.
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