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Old Dec 6, 2012, 07:10 PM   #26
DesterWallaboo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matteusclement View Post
if you're this obsessed about what the background looks like... green screen it.
then edit it in Photoshop with some blur.
Jeez.
Green screen footage isn't just capture and knock out. There's a lot more to it than that.

You should change your tagline on compression from "that's compression" to "that's lossy compression"... because lossless compression is exactly that... lossless.
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Old Dec 7, 2012, 10:17 AM   #27
matteusclement
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DesterWallaboo View Post
Green screen footage isn't just capture and knock out. There's a lot more to it than that.

.
Nope. It's really that simple, especially given the op's limited space and budget, they could get some green fabric, a few lights and be pretty good to go.
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try this:
take an empty pop can, place it on the floor, smash it flat, now try to pull it back to how it was.
see how it looks like crap? that's called compression
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Old Dec 7, 2012, 10:31 AM   #28
acearchie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matteusclement View Post
Nope. It's really that simple, especially given the op's limited space and budget, they could get some green fabric, a few lights and be pretty good to go.
Personally, I wouldn't recommend this as I think on these low budget YT style videos it always looks a little tacky.

If you are going to go this route you will need some lights, access to After Effects, some basic knowledge of keying and some patience whilst it exports.

You will probably be saying goodbye to realtime playback with greenscreen as well so make sure you have finalised your edit before applying all your effects.
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Old Dec 7, 2012, 12:47 PM   #29
DesterWallaboo
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Originally Posted by matteusclement View Post
Nope. It's really that simple, especially given the op's limited space and budget, they could get some green fabric, a few lights and be pretty good to go.
Actually it isn't.... or I should say. If you want realistic green screen compositing it isn't just that simple.

I own a production/post compositing house with a 4500 sq foot green screen insert stage. There's a lot more to quality green screen compositing than simply tossing up some green fabric and rolling footage.

The OP on here doesn't understand F/T-stops nor focal lengths. Tossing him into green screen shooting isn't going to help.
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Old Dec 7, 2012, 09:18 PM   #30
warghh
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Hi OP,

I'm also getting into more serious photography/ videography - Nikon D3100 here. Also quite young, <18. Woop.

Okay, this is basically what I think you want to know:

Depth of Field/ what I call "bokeh" is entirely controlled by your f-stop/ aperture. I'm trying to include multiple terms because if you want to google to expand your knowledge, which I think you should be doing if you are serious, some sites will only use one term.

So, f-stop/ aperture is how much light you're letting into the camera. This is how the two words differ. A low f-stop (e.g. f1.8) means that the hole letting light in is really big. This is also called a big aperture. Meanwhile, a high f-stop means a smaller hole, and hence smaller aperture.

okay. So f-stop is vital to getting nice bokeh, which nearly everyone on here has pointed out. The difference between your 50mm lens and JacksGap's (the twins' youtube channel is called that) 30mm lens is the focal length. Obviously.

Now the bigger your focal length, the more "zoom" you have into an environment. Hence, JacksGap's camera can probably be placed closer to his face than you can with yours. This is really important for bokeh.

The closer an object is to the camera (given that the camera is focused to that said object), the better the bokeh in the background will be. Conversely, the further away the focused object is from the camera, the less bokeh the background will have.

Just learn to take lots of photos/ videos. It'll all turn out.

Another thing, I think the difference between the first and second video is this. In the second video, the camera may not have been exactly focused in that perfect position. Also, first video may have been shot in better quality than the second. i.e. 1080p vs. 720p.

But really, just have fun getting into photography and videography. You'll understand the camera a lot better with experience rather than just reading all of these replies.
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