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Old Jun 19, 2014, 09:51 AM   #26
alent1234
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jnpy!$4g3cwk View Post
I have no idea what you are trying to say.



We already have a monopoly, or, at best, a duopoly, at most people's homes. What we are now seeing is the development of a horizontal monopoly on cable. It the cable monopoly also owns/controls large swaths of content, we have a genuine, you-should-be-frightened, free speech problem.



We have a genuine problem developing, but, I find myself frustrated by the use of the word "internet" in these discussions. Core internet carriers may find it convenient to offer different service classes, so that phone calls may be carried via VOIP over their cores. Or, a class of service that allows loss-free distribution of network video content across the country. It is a perfectly harmless market-driven business decision. There is no reason why "net neutrality" rules should stop carriers from differentiating service for different kinds of traffic. In fact, a lot of money has been spent over the last ten years making this practical, because bulk data transfer has different requirements than, for example, voice.

This is entirely different than a cable monopoly using its market power to restrict deliberately the amount of traffic from sources that don't agree to pay extra rent, or, reduce the viability of content that they do not control. The "last mile" cable provider is not "the internet" any more than AOL was "the internet" in the mid-90's.

The following article explains the situation fairly well, but, is much more sympathetic to the last mile ISP's (Comcast, AT&T, Verizon, TWC) than it is to the core carriers:

http://www.cnet.com/news/comcast-vs-...et-neutrality/

Other articles are much more skeptical about the ISP's behavior:

http://arstechnica.com/information-t...rade-networks/

What to do about monopoly abuse is not obvious in this case. Technologies have been changing radically over the last 20 years, and, I'm sure Libertarians would prefer to let new technology correct existing monopolistic abuse. That does not seem to be working very well the last few years, though.
opensecrets.org tracks political money contributions

al franken is sold to hollywood and other media companies and they are afraid of big ISP's
imagine you're disney or viacom and your contract with Dish expires. they have around 5% of the total pay TV market. you blackout your channels and their customers go crazy demanding they pay up and worst case your revenue drops by 3% or so for 2 months.

now imagine you are dealing with comcast who now owns 30% of pay TV customers. you want to raise prices and they tell you to go to hell and to move ESPN to a premium channel tier and other demands. now you are facing a lot of lost revenue and the possibility that your stock price will drop and lost bonuses for everyone in management

having weak middlemen is how Disney and others can keep on jacking up their prices and force TV carriers to have a thousand channels of mostly crap no one watches or reruns. and make more money licensing the same reruns to netflix

Last edited by alent1234; Jun 19, 2014 at 09:57 AM.
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Old Jun 19, 2014, 11:05 PM   #27
MacNut
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Originally Posted by alent1234 View Post
opensecrets.org tracks political money contributions

al franken is sold to hollywood and other media companies and they are afraid of big ISP's
imagine you're disney or viacom and your contract with Dish expires. they have around 5% of the total pay TV market. you blackout your channels and their customers go crazy demanding they pay up and worst case your revenue drops by 3% or so for 2 months.

now imagine you are dealing with comcast who now owns 30% of pay TV customers. you want to raise prices and they tell you to go to hell and to move ESPN to a premium channel tier and other demands. now you are facing a lot of lost revenue and the possibility that your stock price will drop and lost bonuses for everyone in management

having weak middlemen is how Disney and others can keep on jacking up their prices and force TV carriers to have a thousand channels of mostly crap no one watches or reruns. and make more money licensing the same reruns to netflix
First of all ESPN has the cable companies by the nuts. They raise the price as high as they want and the Cable companies don't budge. ESPN and Comcast are in bed together, they both need each other. ESPN can't make the money on their own, and Comcast can jack up the rates to pay for it.
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Old Jun 20, 2014, 12:46 AM   #28
jnpy!$4g3cwk
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John Oliver (comedian on HBO) takes on net neutrality

Fresh Air just interviewed the comedian John Oliver, who now has a show on HBO. He did a routine explaining and commenting on Net Neutrality. While this NSFW video is somewhat out of my comfort zone, it makes its point:



Quote:
Recently, Oliver tackled net neutrality, or the idea that the Internet should be a level playing field with all data treated equally, whether it's coming from a big corporation or a startup. The Federal Communications Commission is endorsing rules that would end net neutrality and create a data "fast lane" for companies willing to pay a premium. The issue is sometimes discussed in hard-to-follow technical and bureaucratic language, which is where Oliver comes in.

"Internet neutrality is the most important thing that is honestly too boring to care about, and yet it is a pivotal moment in a very, very key issue," Oliver tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "It took a week of sifting through almost paralyzingly dull footage to try and work out how to present it."

But present it he did in a 13-minute rant, and at the end of the show, Oliver encouraged viewers to comment on the FCC website to change the rule. The FCC site received so much traffic, the agency had to send out a few tweets saying it faced "technical difficulties" on its servers.
http://www.npr.org/2014/06/19/323335...s-new-hbo-show
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