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Old Sep 15, 2013, 04:25 PM   #26
wackymacky
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Originally Posted by jav6454 View Post
How long does the Voyager have before it dies?
If mankind every develops technology that enables interstellar travel, even if that's a couple of hundred years away, then we could pop out and replace the battery.

Even at its whopping fast current speed, Voyager will take about 40,000 years to reach the first star in the direction it is headed.

(Not quite sure why they spent the money on the gold disk the message on it. May as well used tin.)
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Old Sep 15, 2013, 05:00 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by wackymacky View Post
(Not quite sure why they spent the money on the gold disk the message on it. May as well used tin.)
It's gold-plated copper actually. The gold was probably used for the same reason as on other craft: to shield it from the unfiltered rays of the sun.
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Old Sep 16, 2013, 12:33 AM   #28
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It's gold-plated copper actually. The gold was probably used for the same reason as on other craft: to shield it from the unfiltered rays of the sun.
I was being facetious really. The probability of anyone every finding the thing, even if there are hundreds of millions of inhabited star systems are so, so, so small.

Even if it was made of iridium and it continues on path and and it reaches the first start it comes by AC+79 3888 in about 41,000AD. and there was an intelligent creature happens to find the thing I doubt there will be much left of it.

That's one of the sad things about the vastness of space; unless there is some kind of method traveling at near light speeds, you may as well stay at home (well in the solar system at least).
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Old Sep 16, 2013, 06:01 AM   #29
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Sigh. The sort of reply that seeks a perfervid escape from my head - while attempting to enlighten the sort of person who is imbued with the brand of religious belief which seems blissfully impervious to the extraordinary advances in human knowledge that the study of the natural sciences has bequeathed to us in recent centuries - might land this wonderful thread in in the less welcome outer reaches of PRSI territory. So, instead, I shall heroically resist such alluring intellectual temptation.........not without a struggle....
So well put

Yes, it was a rather interesting "conversation" of sorts. I was reduced to sipping my coffee quietly while being lectured on the why certain things where simply not possible due to God.

I was also enlightened about the dinosaur were around at the time of Adam and Steve. The dinosaurs didn't follow God so early humans killed them all and buried them deep within the ground to remind man in the future to worship God...

So fun times at work
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Old Sep 16, 2013, 06:37 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by wackymacky View Post
That's one of the sad things about the vastness of space; unless there is some kind of method traveling at near light speeds, you may as well stay at home (well in the solar system at least).
Even at near light speed, or at light speed, it's far too slow to make voyages throughout space meaningful. Really the only way I can see travel in space working is by procreation in space. Generations of humans will have to be born, live their life in space and die. Their offspring would have to follow suit over and over again until/if they reach an inhabitable planet with or without life. That, of course, also infers that they have enough provisions and energy and life systems, the ability to grow food, make/clean water for reuse etc...

Then there is the wormhole theories...
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Old Sep 16, 2013, 06:40 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by SandboxGeneral View Post
Even at near light speed, or at light speed, it's far too slow to make voyages throughout space meaningful. Really the only way I can see travel in space working is by procreation in space. Generations of humans will have to be born, live their life in space and die. Their offspring would have to follow suit over and over again until/if they reach an inhabitable planet with or without life. That, of course, also infers that they have enough provisions and energy and life systems, the ability to grow food, make/clean water for reuse etc...

Then there is the wormhole theories...
If cryogenics was developed further then I could also see that being used.
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Old Sep 16, 2013, 09:18 AM   #32
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There was still some debate on when it officially left that they concluded today.
Perhaps Putin and Obama can arm-wrestle for a decision one way or the other...
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Old Sep 16, 2013, 09:30 AM   #33
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Must be a massive delay on sending and receiving data now its that far out.
You would be surprised - about 18 hours according to NASA
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Old Sep 16, 2013, 09:51 AM   #34
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Even at near light speed, or at light speed, it's far too slow to make voyages throughout space meaningful.
Not quite. Relativity can help. Assuming a constant 1g acceleration, traveling 40 lightyears would take 7.3 years of ship time. Max velocity would be 99.893% the speed of light.

Of course, accelerating at a constant 1g for 12 years is a LOT of energy. 7.4e24 joules if you're in something the mass of the Space Shuttle. That's about $164 quadrillion dollars at today's electricity rates. 41 million kilograms of antimatter, and another 41 million kilograms of matter, would do the trick. But that would just make the ship 41 times heavier, and require more fuel, and on and on... Basically you can't bring enough fuel to travel this way for more than about half a light year or so. However, if you only accelerated at 0.012 Gs, and half you ship's mass was matter/antimatter fuel, you can make the 40 ly trip in only 111 years. Something like a ram-jet that uses interstellar hydrogen for fusion might help keep ship's mass down and up the acceleration.
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Old Sep 16, 2013, 11:26 AM   #35
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Voyager 1 has crossed a new frontier, becoming the first spacecraft ever to leave the solar system, NASA said Thursday.

Thirty-six years after it was launched from Earth on a tour of the outer planets, the plutonium-powered probe is more than 11 1/2 billion miles from the sun, cruising through interstellar space — the vast, cold emptiness between the stars, the space agency said.

Voyager 1 actually made its exit more than a year ago, according to NASA. But it’s not as if there’s a dotted boundary line or a signpost out there, and it was not until recently that scientists with the space agency had enough evidence to say that the probe had finally plowed through the hot plasma bubble surrounding the planets and escaped the sun’s influence.

While some scientists remain unconvinced, NASA celebrated with a news conference featuring the theme from “Star Trek.”

“We got there,” said mission chief scientist Ed Stone of the California Institute of Technology, adding that the spacecraft was “setting sail in the cosmic seas between the stars.”

While Voyager 1 may have left the solar system as most people understand it, it still has hundreds, perhaps thousands, of years to go before bidding adieu to the last icy bodies that make up our neighborhood.

Voyager 1 will now study exotic particles and other phenomena in a never-before-explored part of the universe littered with ancient star explosions and radio the data back to Earth, where the Voyager team awaits the starship’s discoveries.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/busine...45a_story.html

And a good article from The Verge
Hot plasma bubble surrounding the planets? I've not heard of that before. Heat heat, or radiation heat? Something it measured on the way through?
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Old Sep 16, 2013, 11:55 AM   #36
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Hot plasma bubble surrounding the planets? I've not heard of that before. Heat heat, or radiation heat? Something it measured on the way through?
Heat. Plasma in an aurora, for example, can be only 10^2 Kelvin - about 280 F below zero. In a solar core it can be 10^7 Kelvin - about 18 million F. The solar wind that creates the heliosphere has a temperature of about 1 million K. By the time it reaches the heliopause, it's down to 7000 K. That's 12,000 F. Of course, it's such low density that the heat energy content is very low.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_(physics)

http://web.mit.edu/space/www/helio.r...ord.suess.html
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Old Sep 16, 2013, 02:04 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by elistan View Post
Heat. Plasma in an aurora, for example, can be only 10^2 Kelvin - about 280 F below zero. In a solar core it can be 10^7 Kelvin - about 18 million F. The solar wind that creates the heliosphere has a temperature of about 1 million K. By the time it reaches the heliopause, it's down to 7000 K. That's 12,000 F. Of course, it's such low density that the heat energy content is very low.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_(physics)

http://web.mit.edu/space/www/helio.r...ord.suess.html
Thanks for clarifying and the links!
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Old Sep 17, 2013, 10:53 AM   #38
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It's worth mentioning this picture isn't to scale. It will take Voyager 200 years to reach the Oort cloud.

According to the AMA on Reddit, Voyager will start powering down more instruments in 2020, and its final instrument will shut off in 2025. It may have some transmitting capability after that but won't be able to send any useful information.

The reason Voyager has "left the solar system" 15 times is because the edge of the solar system keeps getting redesigned. According to the people at NASA Voyager is in interstellar space, beyond the sun's influence, but it will still be in the solar system until it is past the Oort cloud.
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Old Sep 17, 2013, 10:54 AM   #39
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It's worth mentioning this picture isn't to scale. It will take Voyager 200 years to reach the Oort cloud.
Sure it is. Just a logarithmic scale.
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Old Sep 23, 2013, 06:55 PM   #40
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I found this on reddit:



Continues on the link above. Quite a nice personification if you ask me.
That was an amazing post.
Thanks for linking to it.
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Old Sep 24, 2013, 03:26 PM   #41
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The time it would take

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Originally Posted by Kissaragi View Post
Must be a massive delay on sending and receiving data now its that far out.
approximately 17 hrs. 34 sec.
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Old Sep 27, 2013, 05:47 AM   #42
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it will return back to Earth

Voyager is going to return back to Earth some day but it will be known as V'Ger when it does.
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Old Sep 27, 2013, 10:05 AM   #43
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Voyager is going to return back to Earth some day but it will be known as V'Ger when it does.
Cool, never heard that joke before! [/light hearted sarcasm]
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Old Sep 27, 2013, 10:17 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by RAPrescottssi View Post
approximately 17 hrs. 34 sec.
Twice that to send and receive.
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Old Sep 27, 2013, 12:44 PM   #45
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Voyager is going to return back to Earth some day but it will be known as V'Ger when it does.
No, that's Voyager 6!
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Old Oct 1, 2013, 03:59 PM   #46
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Beyond The Infinite?

Heads up Dave!

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