Go Back   MacRumors Forums > Special Interests > Visual Media > Digital Video

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old Sep 8, 2013, 10:16 PM   #1
TheBeastman13
macrumors regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Recording video with a Nikon D7100. Tips?

I have some video side project coming up, and just got the d7100. I'm a novice with both the camera and DSLR video shooting in general. Any tips you can provide would be helpful!

I noticed when I rack focus, my adjustments are shaky and are noticed when playing back test footage. Any thoughts on this? I'm using the kit lens, the nikkor 18-105mm( I believe; I don't have my camera on me currently). The lens is set to MF, and the switch on the camera body is set to MF. This is correct to do, right? Since I do not have a follow focus, I rack with my hand. I think my ******* tripod (it's light and very cheap) is adding to the shakiness as it does not serve as a heavy, study foundation.

Thanks, all, for any insight and tips you have for an amateur such as myself.
TheBeastman13 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8, 2013, 10:39 PM   #2
ezekielrage_99
macrumors 68040
 
ezekielrage_99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
I'm using the Nikon D7100 for shooting VOD and weather graphics on a chroma key in a studio.

For on the go shooting:
  • 64GB 45bm/s SD Card.
  • Tripod
  • Stock lens looks not too bad despite what many say.
  • LED Lighting for the Hot Shoe, just like this
    A boom mic or lapel mic, seriously the 7100 mic is pretty darn horrid though there are some good cheap options like this

For me this is really basic set ups but works rather nicely. The only thing I would suggest is with the 7100 it doesn't allow for the aperture to change when shooting so investing in basic lighting and a tripod for really good results is a must.

StudioThis is what I am currently using, it allows be to live view HD directly from the camera via the HDMI then composite over a chroma key, I can mix several channels and record via an external source.
__________________
"There is a world elsewhere" - Coriolanus
ezekielrage_99 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8, 2013, 10:56 PM   #3
TheBeastman13
Thread Starter
macrumors regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
In regards to the SD cards, I have two 32GB 95mb/s SanDisk cards. When shooting Full HD (I'll be shooting at 1080p 24fps), how quickly can you fill up a card that size? Also, do you ever have the 20 min/shot cap intrude on your filming process?


Which tripod do you have?

And I've never done any live broadcast work, so I have no idea how that BlackMagic apparatus works. Lol

Just to clarify, you are able to use your MacBook to view what is being shot, via the HDMI? How does one activate that option, where in the d7100's menu setup do I find this ability?

Thanks for the thoughtful insight!
TheBeastman13 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 9, 2013, 03:09 AM   #4
initialsBB
macrumors 6502a
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBeastman13 View Post
In regards to the SD cards, I have two 32GB 95mb/s SanDisk cards. When shooting Full HD (I'll be shooting at 1080p 24fps), how quickly can you fill up a card that size? Also, do you ever have the 20 min/shot cap intrude on your filming process?
D7100 shoots 24mbps video, so a 32GB card will give you a maximum 3 hours of video.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBeastman13 View Post
Just to clarify, you are able to use your MacBook to view what is being shot, via the HDMI? How does one activate that option, where in the d7100's menu setup do I find this ability?
Nikon DSLRs output video through HDMI when in Live View mode. That way you can view/record what the camera is seeing on an external machine that has HDMI inputs. I don't think the MacBook has HDMI input, and that is why ezekielrage_99 uses the ATEM (also allows live switching between several cameras). You could hook up the D7100 to a TV or computer monitor with HDMI if you want to try it out (needs mini-HDMI type C connector cable).

If you use Live View's HDMI output to record, you will have to look at the user manual for the menu options regarding clean outputs - no overlays for exposure, etc.

Lastly, a sturdy tripod is a must for video shooting unless you want the shaky hand held look. Good video tripods are expensive for a reason. Switching to manual focus is essential, as you have done, but you should also use Nikon's exposure lock in toggle mode (user manual for AE-L/AF-L). Shooting video with DSLRs requires experience and a steady hand.

Last edited by initialsBB; Sep 9, 2013 at 03:19 AM.
initialsBB is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 9, 2013, 08:07 AM   #5
TheBeastman13
Thread Starter
macrumors regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Thanks for the clarification and feedback.
TheBeastman13 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 9, 2013, 12:28 PM   #6
ChrisA
macrumors G4
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Redondo Beach, California
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheBeastman13 View Post
I have some video side project coming up, and just got the d7100. I'm a novice with both the camera and DSLR video shooting in general. Any tips you can provide would be helpful!

I noticed when I rack focus, my adjustments are shaky and are noticed when playing back test footage. Any thoughts on this? I'm using the kit lens, the nikkor 18-105mm( I believe; I don't have my camera on me currently). The lens is set to MF, and the switch on the camera body is set to MF. This is correct to do, right? Since I do not have a follow focus, I rack with my hand. I think my ******* tripod (it's light and very cheap) is adding to the shakiness as it does not serve as a heavy, study foundation.

Thanks, all, for any insight and tips you have for an amateur such as myself.
#1 use a solid tripod, and (this is important and low-cost too) put sandbags on the tripod legs. Bags filas with 15 pounds of sand or pea gravel or lead shot. At a very minimum if you can't afford a $5 sand bag fill a 5 gal bucket with with dirt and have it from the tripod between the legs. All of these have the effect of FIRMLY holding the tripod to the floor. Every video production truck I've seen have piles of sandbags they use on all their stands, they are cheap and turn a cheap stand into a very solid one

#2 use enough light and learn where to place the lights. NOT on the camera. You need a main light up and to the left or right and a fill light. you camera can only handle a very limited dynamic range the fill light controls the lighting ratio. You can add other lights but that is just "details" and you can use a reflector in place of the fill light to save $$$.

Just those two things, good lighting with a modest fill ratio and a massive tripod and you will be miles ahead of most amateurs.

One more thing is a follow focus stick. this is just a plastic handle that attaches to the focus ring. Some guys use a white card with focus setting on it. You work them out in advance. Then move the stick to the marked position on the card.

EDIT: For about $100 you can get a focus dial but a plain old plastic stick fixed to the focus ring woks 80% as well at 10% of the cost. The point here is you do NOT look through the lens while you focus. You look at the actor. You have already in advance marked off the focus points. Those $100 dials have white-board like erasable surface so you can mark it up and then just move the dial to the mark.

Film making is not easy. Once you take the camera off of full auto need to do both pan and follow focus. It take two people. One guy just to run the focus control and one to aim the camera. But if you are shooting interviews and instructional videos just leave it on autofocus. Those follow focus devices are for cinematographers.

Last edited by ChrisA; Sep 14, 2013 at 10:23 PM.
ChrisA is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 9, 2013, 02:27 PM   #7
adamneer
macrumors regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Chicago, IL
i wasn't aware the 7100 was capable of clean HDMI out. I'm nearly certain my 5100 will not output a clean full 1080 signal, which I would absolutely love for 4:2:2 or 4:4:4 RGB, and a much better bit rate than the 20mb or so the camera records in.
__________________
vimeo.com/adamneer
iOS - iPhone 5 & iPad mini w/retina
OSX - 2012 iMac 27" 3.4ghz i7 w/680MX, 32gb ram; 2012 rMBP 15" 2.3ghz i7 w/16gb ram
adamneer is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 9, 2013, 03:05 PM   #8
jpine
macrumors 6502
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamneer View Post
i wasn't aware the 7100 was capable of clean HDMI out. I'm nearly certain my 5100 will not output a clean full 1080 signal, which I would absolutely love for 4:2:2 or 4:4:4 RGB, and a much better bit rate than the 20mb or so the camera records in.
Remember that a "clean" output just means there is no camera information in the output viewer. My new Nikon D5200 has Clean output, but I'm not yet convinced that the output is 4:2:2. The video looks better recorded through my Blackmagic Intensity Pro in my MP, at least to my naked eye, than the camera's compression algorithm on the SD card.
jpine is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 9, 2013, 07:34 PM   #9
TheBeastman13
Thread Starter
macrumors regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Any recommended follow focus rigs?

EDIT: I forgot to mention earlier that I'm confused as to what I can alter when recording video in regards to ISO, shutter speed, and Aperture. Can I make adjustments in the area of shutter speed when I wish to record, and does altering the shutter speed affect the video quality?

Last edited by TheBeastman13; Sep 9, 2013 at 10:36 PM. Reason: Making an addendum to my post
TheBeastman13 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 10, 2013, 08:23 AM   #10
ezekielrage_99
macrumors 68040
 
ezekielrage_99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
For focus rings in the past I've used these they seem to do the trick nicely.

Regarding tripods, it depends how much you want to spend but Manfrotto usually make decent kit and a fairly reasonable prices (they also have a very nice LED hotshoe light which isn't to bad for both video and portrait shooting).

SD card, what you have is fine. For most of the work I do it's it's live and capture to a 3TB drive.

From memory the 5200 does live view but after the the new firmware update, and I don't beleive it will do much more than 720p or 1080i at 25fps.

And listen to ChrisA, he had some very good points.
__________________
"There is a world elsewhere" - Coriolanus
ezekielrage_99 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 13, 2013, 09:54 PM   #11
adamneer
macrumors regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Chicago, IL
there are tons of cheap $100-$150 follow focus's that seem to be rebranded any number of ways on Amazon and Ebay. I've been meaning to get one, as my focus pulling is terrible using the lens ring alone. Unfortunately, the majority of the cheap follow focus's don't have hard stops, which to me, seems like the biggest advantage to using one in the first place. if you have to look at a card or dial to see your focus marks, how can you also pay attention to what you're shooting? also don't forget, nearly all traditional dial follow focus will also require you to have some sort of 15mm rod setup, which if you've done any research, are marked up to the extreme. for some reason, bits of aluminum that are cut up by robots in large factories cost considerably more than you'd expect them to.
__________________
vimeo.com/adamneer
iOS - iPhone 5 & iPad mini w/retina
OSX - 2012 iMac 27" 3.4ghz i7 w/680MX, 32gb ram; 2012 rMBP 15" 2.3ghz i7 w/16gb ram
adamneer is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 14, 2013, 10:32 PM   #12
ChrisA
macrumors G4
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Redondo Beach, California
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamneer View Post
there are tons of cheap $100-$150 follow focus's that seem to be rebranded any number of ways on Amazon and Ebay..
The cheapest is the "stick". You can make one with wood and a zip tie. Or you can buy them. Google found this example of one brand of focus stick. Not as fancy as the dial but 80% as good and 5% the cost
http://cheesycam.com/using-varavon-s...us-zoom-lever/
The video shows it pretty well. Saves the cost of a rail system too
ChrisA is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 15, 2013, 05:42 PM   #13
adamneer
macrumors regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Chicago, IL
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisA View Post
The cheapest is the "stick". You can make one with wood and a zip tie. Or you can buy them. Google found this example of one brand of focus stick. Not as fancy as the dial but 80% as good and 5% the cost
http://cheesycam.com/using-varavon-s...us-zoom-lever/
The video shows it pretty well. Saves the cost of a rail system too
Yes, but like i said previously, i'd still much prefer a "set it and forget it" function which would allow me to rack focus without looking for a mark. I know the stick style focus add on's are both ultra cheap and effective, but not the functionality i'm looking to achieve, regardless of cost. But to add to your suggestion for anyone else interested, one method I've noticed is popular is using silicone jar openers marketed by Gary Trudeau available on Amazon for about $7.00 for a set of 3.
__________________
vimeo.com/adamneer
iOS - iPhone 5 & iPad mini w/retina
OSX - 2012 iMac 27" 3.4ghz i7 w/680MX, 32gb ram; 2012 rMBP 15" 2.3ghz i7 w/16gb ram
adamneer is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 15, 2013, 06:05 PM   #14
adamneer
macrumors regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Chicago, IL
Quote:
Originally Posted by ezekielrage_99 View Post
For focus rings in the past I've used these they seem to do the trick nicely.

Regarding tripods, it depends how much you want to spend but Manfrotto usually make decent kit and a fairly reasonable prices (they also have a very nice LED hotshoe light which isn't to bad for both video and portrait shooting).

SD card, what you have is fine. For most of the work I do it's it's live and capture to a 3TB drive.

From memory the 5200 does live view but after the the new firmware update, and I don't beleive it will do much more than 720p or 1080i at 25fps.

And listen to ChrisA, he had some very good points.

wow, I knew Cinevate was pricey but I just need to point out the ludicrous markup they've got on a few things such as

http://www.cinevate.com/store2/camer....9SOG49Db.dpbs

-this pack of 2 aluminum feet and some ratchet knobs (which are available from many hardware sources for <$3 each). they only want a mere $225. what a bargain!


http://www.cinevate.com/store2/camer....oWVtrF02.dpbs

-3 skateboard wheels and some cap screws for just $100!


http://www.cinevate.com/store2/camer....JNvVnFU9.dpbs

-only $525 for this NiMH battery?


http://www.cinevate.com/store2/camer....AjEqOKfl.dpbs

-ooh, $45 seems like a fair price for a single nylon gear right?



apparently aluminum and plastic costs more when its meant for filmmaking.
__________________
vimeo.com/adamneer
iOS - iPhone 5 & iPad mini w/retina
OSX - 2012 iMac 27" 3.4ghz i7 w/680MX, 32gb ram; 2012 rMBP 15" 2.3ghz i7 w/16gb ram
adamneer is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16, 2013, 05:55 AM   #15
ezekielrage_99
macrumors 68040
 
ezekielrage_99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamneer View Post
apparently aluminum and plastic costs more when its meant for filmmaking.
LOL, a sad but true statement.

It's like booking a hotel function room for a wedding opposed to a party.
__________________
"There is a world elsewhere" - Coriolanus
ezekielrage_99 is offline   0 Reply With Quote

Reply
MacRumors Forums > Special Interests > Visual Media > Digital Video

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Similar Threads
thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Nikon D7100 Camera Lens Slevin Digital Photography 51 Mar 18, 2014 08:10 PM
Recording webcam video with screen recording software? kat.hayes Alternatives to iOS and iOS Devices 2 Jan 3, 2014 11:41 AM

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:07 AM.

Mac Rumors | Mac | iPhone | iPhone Game Reviews | iPhone Apps

Mobile Version | Fixed | Fluid | Fluid HD
Copyright 2002-2013, MacRumors.com, LLC