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Old Nov 23, 2014, 10:06 AM   #4376
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So, if you must drink tea, I would suggest setting some of the same standards that many of us here would routinely attempt to apply to coffee. Source the tea carefully, and aim for freshness. If it has come (directly) from somewhere in central Asia, or the Indian sub-contintent, and is very fresh, and of a high quality, it can be an utter revelation.
Good advice. Thank you. I have just started researching tea supply possibilities, and will report back as things steep.


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Was running low on beans so I stopped in at Tim Horton's and picked up a bag of whole beans. Mmmmm
Yes, I need to roast today....the usual plus some extra as the long holiday weekend no doubt will produce higher than usual coffee consumption. New Classic Espresso....Ethiopiques....Liquid Amber. Choices, choices.
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Old Nov 23, 2014, 10:24 AM   #4377
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Good advice. Thank you. I have just started researching tea supply possibilities, and will report back as things steep.




Yes, I need to roast today....the usual plus some extra as the long holiday weekend no doubt will produce higher than usual coffee consumption. New Classic Espresso....Ethiopiques....Liquid Amber. Choices, choices.
Enjoy the roasting process and - more importantly - enjoy drinking the coffee which ensues. Actually, I keep forgetting that this is the Thanksgiving Holiday in the US.

Re tea, to my surprise, I realised that the sort of adjectives we routinely apply to coffee on this thread - words such as 'clean', 'bright', 'fresh', 'clear', were words that I found myself supplying to describe many of the teas (almost invariably excellent) that I had occasion to drink in central Asia. As I said, it was something of a revelation, and I am not normally a tea drinker.

In fact, the only country I have visited where both the tea and the coffee are invariably excellent is Turkey, where the restaurants, cafés and even the airport shops, all serve really exceptionally good tea and first rate coffee.
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Old Nov 23, 2014, 02:49 PM   #4378
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Enjoy the roasting process and - more importantly - enjoy drinking the coffee which ensues. Actually, I keep forgetting that this is the Thanksgiving Holiday in the US.

Re tea, to my surprise, I realised that the sort of adjectives we routinely apply to coffee on this thread - words such as 'clean', 'bright', 'fresh', 'clear', were words that I found myself supplying to describe many of the teas (almost invariably excellent) that I had occasion to drink in central Asia. As I said, it was something of a revelation, and I am not normally a tea drinker.

In fact, the only country I have visited where both the tea and the coffee are invariably excellent is Turkey, where the restaurants, cafés and even the airport shops, all serve really exceptionally good tea and first rate coffee.
Excellent point about our descriptive words. Not something I had thought about.

You know, sooner or later you are going to talk me into visiting Turkey.....

I lived in Japan for a time many years ago (no, I was never in the military.....that is usually the next question) and really enjoyed the sencha tea, but it is not something I brought back with me.

Turns out there is a nice tea shop 4 miles from my house. Be back later!
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Old Nov 23, 2014, 02:52 PM   #4379
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I lived in Japan for a time many years ago (no, I was never in the military.....that is usually the next question)
And that would have been my next question too! Especially since I lived there for a year and was, in fact, in the military then. Of course, I never made it to the mainland Japan and stayed on the beautiful island of Okinawa. Oh, how I do miss that place. I really loved it there.
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Old Nov 23, 2014, 03:00 PM   #4380
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And that would have been my next question too! Especially since I lived there for a year and was, in fact, in the military then. Of course, I never made it to the mainland Japan and stayed on the beautiful island of Okinawa. Oh, how I do miss that place. I really loved it there.
Yes, I am a huge fan of Japan as well. I spent two years there just traveling around, sort of as a break from college. I had planned to go all over Asia, but became enamored with Japan and spent the entire two years there.

I visited Okinawa a few times. This was back in the early 80's, when Kadena was just huge and massive and the southern part of the island had a lot of military stuff. We used to sit and watch the Habu's (SR-71s) take off in the early mornings. It was cheap entertainment.

Did you ever make it to any of the smaller islands in the chain? I spent a bunch of time out on Kerama Reto. A very peaceful place.
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Old Nov 23, 2014, 03:08 PM   #4381
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Yes, I am a huge fan of Japan as well. I spent two years there just traveling around, sort of as a break from college. I had planned to go all over Asia, but became enamored with Japan and spent the entire two years there.

I visited Okinawa a few times. This was back in the early 80's, when Kadena was just huge and massive and the southern part of the island had a lot of military stuff. We used to sit and watch the Habu's (SR-71s) take off in the early mornings. It was cheap entertainment.

Did you ever make it to any of the smaller islands in the chain? I spent a bunch of time out on Kerama Reto. A very peaceful place.
That must have been an amazing sight to personally watch the SR-71's! That is one of my favorite planes to read about. I actually read this article about a month ago.

Alas, being in the military, at the time, travel was restricted to Okinawa only and some areas were off limits at that. We had to sign out and travel in, at least, groups of two's or more, for safety. Leaving the island was only done on official business, and aside from returning to the US, I left the island to go to Australia on official business. Australia was amazing too. We were there to train with the Australian Air Force and also had about two weeks of liberty in Darwin.

Two places I wish to visit again someday, Japan and Australia.
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Old Nov 23, 2014, 04:01 PM   #4382
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Fascinating posts about Japan and Australia, neither of which I have ever managed to visit (yet), - and watching SR-71s, which sounds extremely interesting.

Thanks for posting that link, SBG; very interesting to read.

Kurwenal: Turkey is extraordinarily interesting; I must return for longer visits, but this is a place with climate, culture, history, which wears its multiple pasts unusually easily. Although my visits were always en route to, or from somewhere[s] else, I must say that I really liked the place, and plan to return for longer, lingering visits.
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Old Nov 23, 2014, 04:16 PM   #4383
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Fascinating posts about Japan and Australia, neither of which I have ever managed to visit (yet), - and watching SR-71s, which sounds extremely interesting.

Thanks for posting that link, SBG; very interesting to read.

Kurwenal: Turkey is extraordinarily interesting; I must return for longer visits, but this is a place with climate, culture, history, which wears its multiple pasts unusually easily. Although my visits were always en route to, or from somewhere[s] else, I must say that I really liked the place, and plan to return for longer, lingering visits.
In addition to Japan and Australia, I'd love to return to Korea, South Korea that is. I spent a month there and it was a fabulous place to visit and the local cuisine was fantastic. I really miss *fresh* Korean food. (There is that *fresh* word again )
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Old Nov 23, 2014, 04:44 PM   #4384
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In addition to Japan and Australia, I'd love to return to Korea, South Korea that is. I spent a month there and it was a fabulous place to visit and the local cuisine was fantastic. I really miss *fresh* Korean food. (There is that *fresh* word again )
Agree completely.

On the topic of 'fresh' food in a number of Asian countries, two of the places where I spent time in central Asia had the most incredibly delicious street food, again - 'freshly' cooked.

Anyway, I have yet to encounter an Asian cuisine I dislike;Thai, Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese and some of the food from some of the 'stans' of central Asia, I find them all delicious, especially the emphasis on balance and contrast of flavours, textures, tastes, and the deep commitment to fresh food.

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Old Nov 23, 2014, 07:47 PM   #4385
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That must have been an amazing sight to personally watch the SR-71's! That is one of my favorite planes to read about. I actually read this article about a month ago.
Great article, thank you for the post.

The friend I visited in Okinawa had an apartment that was near to and off the end of one of main Kadena runways. It was cooler to sleep on the roof, so we would drag our futons up there and sleep. Many mornings, about 4 or 5 am, the Habu would serve as a wake up call. This is not my video, but this gives an idea of what we saw.


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Kurwenal: Turkey is extraordinarily interesting; I must return for longer visits, but this is a place with climate, culture, history, which wears its multiple pasts unusually easily. Although my visits were always en route to, or from somewhere[s] else, I must say that I really liked the place, and plan to return for longer, lingering visits.
I have a work colleague who is originally from Transylvania and has for years offered tour guide services if I ever make it there. I would love to do that and perhaps I can pair it up with a Turkey visit. Hmmm, so many options.

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Agree completely.

On the topic of 'fresh' food in a number of Asian countries, two of the places where I spent time in central Asia had the most incredibly delicious street food, again - 'freshly' cooked.

Anyway, I have yet to encounter an Asian cuisine I dislike;Thai, Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese and some of the food from some of the 'stans' of central Asia, I find them all delicious, especially the emphasis on balance and contrast of favours, textures, tastes, and the deep commitment to fresh food.
Add me to the list of Asian cuisine devotees. Asian street food is about as good as it gets. This conversation will cause me to go find some pictures to post, of course.

Sitting here drinking my first cup of tea in probably a decade or longer. A not-inexpensive white tea, recommended by the tea experts I visited this afternoon. I am a complete newbie in this area and have much to learn.

Turns out you can "roast" your own tea....it arrives raw and then you have to process it. Turns out that Japanese tea must be steamed, while Chinese tea is pan fried. Who knew?
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Old Nov 23, 2014, 11:41 PM   #4386
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I've travelled to Thailand quite a few times, mostly through my occupation but also as a back packer in the 90's. Their food tastes amazing and has such a distinctive fragrance. I don't usually eat Thai food back home in the UK because It never comes close to tasting the same.
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Old Yesterday, 09:01 AM   #4387
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Well, the coffee from Mexico that I wrote about earlier is not one that will feature on a re-order. However, in the spirit of exploration and discovery, I am glad that I had occasion to order it and try it out.

Anyway, not before time, this morning, I opened another offering from Intelligentsia. This is not one of the two that I love (and frequently order - I have noticed that we all seem to have strong favourites that we return to again and again).

Instead, it is from Ethiopia, and is called 'Yirgacheffe Limited Release'. A lovely, clear, clean, elegant and smooth coffee.
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Old Yesterday, 07:34 PM   #4388
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I've travelled to Thailand quite a few times, mostly through my occupation but also as a back packer in the 90's.
Ah, sounds like a ton of fun.

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Instead, it is from Ethiopia, and is called 'Yirgacheffe Limited Release'. A lovely, clear, clean, elegant and smooth coffee.
I suspect you just made mobilehaathi salivate.
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Old Yesterday, 07:45 PM   #4389
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Ah, sounds like a ton of fun.



I suspect you just made mobilehaathi salivate.
Ahhh, yes, well that is certainly my favorite region.

I think my next SM's order will consist of some different SO Yrgacheffes and Ethiopiques if it is still around. I'm super tempted to treat myself to a Chemex these days, incidentally.....
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Old Yesterday, 07:50 PM   #4390
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Ahhh, yes, well that is certainly my favorite region.

I think my next SM's order will consist of some different SO Yrgacheffes and Ethiopiques if it is still around. I'm super tempted to treat myself to a Chemex these days, incidentally.....
You know, we should all just give in and buy everything the others own, just to get it over with.......

(You need the kettle too....)
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Old Yesterday, 07:54 PM   #4391
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I've been meaning to post for the last few days, but I never seems to be able to find time to write a few brief thoughts.

1) I posted in this thread long ago, but checked back a week or two ago and saw Silver Bridge Coffee listed on the front page. That excited me, because they have been the sole provider of coffee in my house since I met them at a farmer's market in Columbus. Fantastic people, and have really treated me well in our encounters. I really like the Buckeye Breakfast Buzz, but we've been drinking Silver Bridge Blend almost exclusively lately. What I really like is that I can walk across the street to Kroger and grab a bag of Silver Bridge and know that it was roasted in the last week.

2) I know this thread originated as a dedicated thread to espresso, but I wanted to share my new buy. I went to a local thrift store to find an air popper to try my hand at home roasting. I had no luck in that search, but came across a rather rough looking Bunn BX-B brewer for $7.99. It was missing the brew basket and the carafe, but replacements have been ordered. After cleaning and testing I have a working brewer for under $30. Not bad considering that model costs $125 new. Any tips or experience with a Bunn Velocity brewer?
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Old Today, 06:56 AM   #4392
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Ah, sounds like a ton of fun.



I suspect you just made mobilehaathi salivate.
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Ahhh, yes, well that is certainly my favorite region.

I think my next SM's order will consist of some different SO Yrgacheffes and Ethiopiques if it is still around. I'm super tempted to treat myself to a Chemex these days, incidentally.....
Well, what can I say? Other than that I'm delighted to have helped to make mobilehaathi's day, not an awful lot. You have excellent taste, sir. Allow me to compliment you on it.

I will say (and, perhaps surprisingly, for, while I knew of the reputation for excellence that some of the Ethiopian offerings come with, this has been the first time I have sampled a Yrgacheffe region/style coffee) that the Ethiopian Yirgacheffe (Limited Release) is quite excellent - I am thoroughly enjoying it, and am sipping a cup as I write.
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Old Today, 08:04 AM   #4393
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2) I know this thread originated as a dedicated thread to espresso, but I wanted to share my new buy. I went to a local thrift store to find an air popper to try my hand at home roasting. I had no luck in that search, but came across a rather rough looking Bunn BX-B brewer for $7.99. It was missing the brew basket and the carafe, but replacements have been ordered. After cleaning and testing I have a working brewer for under $30. Not bad considering that model costs $125 new. Any tips or experience with a Bunn Velocity brewer?
I don't know that model or even Bunn brewers, so cannot provide any tips. In general, most drip brewers suffer from a list of issues, including a water temperature that is either too low throughout extraction, or that starts at an appropriate temperature but soon drops. Even at something like 170 or 180, the chemical reactions that are necessary for coffee to "brew" never happen.

So, you might want to stick a thermocouple up into the unit and see how it is doing in this respect. But, hey, $30. Can't beat that.


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Well, what can I say? Other than that I'm delighted to have helped to make mobilehaathi's day, not an awful lot. You have excellent taste, sir. Allow me to compliment you on it.

I will say (and, perhaps surprisingly, for, while I knew of the reputation for excellence that some of the Ethiopian offerings come with, this has been the first time I have sampled a Yrgacheffe region/style coffee) that the Ethiopian Yirgacheffe (Limited Release) is quite excellent - I am thoroughly enjoying it, and am sipping a cup as I write.
OK, ordering up some Yrgacheffe, as it appears this will be the coffee we discuss in December. MH, I think I am going to start with this one:'

Quote:

This was a top-scoring dry-processed coffee we selected from many Southern Ethiopia samples, sent to us by a private washing station owner in the region. His group do a very good job of managing several washing stations in Yirga Cheffe, of which we've brought in several this year, many garnering our top scores. Located very close to Yirga Cheffe town, the Konga area is a central hub for coffee in the region. This particular lot of Konga is in an area of Yirga Cheffe with a range of 1900-2100 meters, and is dry-processed on raised beds at one station in the Konga zone. Smallholder farmers from around the region delivery their heirloom Ethiopian coffee varietals to the station where it is weighed and then sun dried before being delivered to Addis Ababa for sale. This lot is a 'clean' version of the process with its wide array of fruit characteristics easily perceptible. This coffee was prepared to Grade 1 specifications, and while we still have occasional quaker beans in the roast (from under-ripe cherries), these are minimal compared to other super-grade dry-processed coffees.

This Konga Dry-Process is both potent, fruit-forward and quite refined as well. The dry fragrance is very sweet, overflowing with red berry and stone fruit smells, along with tropical fruit beauty, guava and mango. Adding hot water, we get peaches and cream in the light roast, cinnamon stick, and a slight jasmine note, while darker roasts taking on a smell of darker fruit syrups like plum and date. Unlike many naturals we tasted this year, the fruits in Konga aren't over ripe/winey, or 'dusty' in flavor. They are relatively brighter in acidity than other dry-process lots. The cup is top-loaded with fruit notes of peach preserves, chocolate-dipped strawberry, and lychee hints, accented by strong sweet spices of chai blends, cinnamon, ginger, and cardamom. It's a bodied cup, which carries a sweetness of date sugar and molasses long in the aftertastes. We cupped this coffee at City+ and Full City and it works well at both levels, complex, sweet, and a fairly 'clean' cup - especially considering processing method. A coffee that will keep the adjectives rolling! We have used small amounts of this one in espresso blends too, adding a nice fruit zing to the shot (or try as SO for the adventurous types!).
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Old Today, 09:24 AM   #4394
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I don't know that model or even Bunn brewers, so cannot provide any tips. In general, most drip brewers suffer from a list of issues, including a water temperature that is either too low throughout extraction, or that starts at an appropriate temperature but soon drops. Even at something like 170 or 180, the chemical reactions that are necessary for coffee to "brew" never happen.

So, you might want to stick a thermocouple up into the unit and see how it is doing in this respect. But, hey, $30. Can't beat that.




OK, ordering up some Yrgacheffe, as it appears this will be the coffee we discuss in December. MH, I think I am going to start with this one:'
Hah! That's precisely the one I'm planning to buy!
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Old Today, 11:57 AM   #4395
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I went to a local thrift store to find an air popper to try my hand at home roasting.
Okay, I use the West Bend Air Crazy (available on Amazon, although I swear a paid less for it in the past). For best results you may have to mod it a bit by disassembling it and detaching the thermo sensor that turns off the heating element above a certain temperature.

It is super DIY, and the batch sizes are small (~75g of green beans). So you're always dialing in a new grind. It is impossible to get radical consistency from batch to batch, and you have to be extremely attentive---not just to the roast process but also to the ambient temperature in the room and other environmental variables. In the summer FC finishes a full minute before FC finishes in the winter (I don't have climate control in my apt). And you must either have multiple machines, or you must wait a few minutes between roasting sessions to let the machine cool off (or you'll blow the heating element).

All that said, it is extremely easy and cheap, and I've learned a lot about the process. All things considered it is a remarkably good roaster and I highly recommend it if you're looking for a cheap entry into home roasting. For what it is worth, SM's seems to prefer the air popper method over some of the more expensive ($100s) air coffee roasters, citing a more even roast with the popcorn poppers.
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