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Old Jun 16, 2014, 06:07 AM   #26
Keukasmallie
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As a retired superintendent of public schools in NYS, I'm still amazed at the idea held by many that formal school settings are the only places to achieve the objectives involved in learning the skills and gaining the experiences most of us need and value today.

That's as short sighted as thinking that teachers are the only effective teachers.
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Old Jun 16, 2014, 10:21 AM   #27
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As a retired superintendent of public schools in NYS, I'm still amazed at the idea held by many that formal school settings are the only places to achieve the objectives involved in learning the skills and gaining the experiences most of us need and value today.
I have never heard that idea expressed by a single person in my entire life. Many?

I would love to take a bunch of 4004-BC creationists on a tour of fossil sites (and museums) in the West. From Berlin–Ichthyosaur State Park in Nevada, through Dinosaur National Monument in Utah/Colorado, to the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana. There is nothing like seeing such sites in person to provide a reality check.

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That's as short sighted as thinking that teachers are the only effective teachers.


I think I know what you mean.

I've never heard anyone express that idea, either. But, I have heard public school teachers express concern about the loss of a common understanding of what it means to be an American.
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Old Jun 19, 2014, 08:59 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Keukasmallie View Post
As a retired superintendent of public schools in NYS, I'm still amazed at the idea held by many that formal school settings are the only places to achieve the objectives involved in learning the skills and gaining the experiences most of us need and value today.

That's as short sighted as thinking that teachers are the only effective teachers.
how many parents are qualified to teach AP chemisty, physics, calculus, and other advanced subjects?
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Old Jun 19, 2014, 10:08 AM   #29
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I noticed two things from homeschoolers coming into my high school classroom. I am not saying this applies to every single homeschooled child just general observations.

1) My students who were homeschooled were use to working at their own pace (to a certain degree) and found it difficult to budget their time wisely. This was most noticeable during tests. This was something that most kids could adapt to fairly easily and didn't impact the grades much as there are not any major tests in the beginning of the semester.

2) Illness. There seems to be a period of several weeks that home school kids stay sick. Nothing that keeps them from school but runny noses, coughs, stuffed noses, etc. I think this applies more to kids who are homeschooled for several years and have limited social interactions. Their bodies just aren't exposed to as much as everyone else and need time to build up resistance.

I don't have any issue with homeschooling and I know it can be just like any education as thorough or bare as the teacher wants to make it. I think some social interactions learned in the school setting are helpful for most kids but not something that will severely limit the kid later in life.
I found it quite the opposite.

1. The students I had who were home schooled actually did very well in adapting to the change in pace. Speaking with them they were on timelines at home just like anyone else. There was a curriculum they followed, and had to be completed at certain times just like I had in my classroom, so no real adjustment for them. Also most were given timed test just like public schools, and I was also surprised how many actually take the state tests.

As far as grades....The home school transfers far exceeded the ones who had not been home schooled. Night and day. I am not sure I ever had one that was not an honor student.

2. As far as social interaction I found that they had no issues socializing with the other students, and actually noticed they seemed to take it upon themselves to seek out new friends. Most were actually more outgoing (this surprised me) and one huge thing I noticed is that they seemed to be able to interact with adults much better.

I think there is the stereotype that home school kids are locked in an attic or basement all day.

But from what I have seen I wish they were all home schooled. I am no longer a teacher, so wouldn't affect my job status any

Forgot one other thing.....most of them also used very uncommon terms among kids these days....."Yes sir", "Thank You", "Please", "Excuse me", etc.

One of my favorite videos a home school kid sent me. BTW...this was not one of my students.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJHt-m3VX6o

Edit: Also about the sickness thing...sounds like you were describing me. One of the greatest things about no longer teaching school is....I don't get sick all the stinkin' time.
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Last edited by tshrimp; Jun 19, 2014 at 10:19 AM.
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Old Jun 19, 2014, 10:32 AM   #30
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Actually, that isn't it. We are holding up traffic because we are carefully driving trying to keep our Prius in economy mode and avoiding losing mpg by pressing too hard on that gas pedal.

And I'll continue to hammer home the message about parents being responsible for educating their children, as long as I am able to do so. Nothing infuriates me more than a parent who blames the teacher for their child's failing. Even worse? A parent who has never met that teacher, yet holds him/her responsible for their child's failures.
Could not agree more. As an Ex Teacher, I can tell you that having involved/caring parents is very very important for the success of the child.
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Old Jun 19, 2014, 10:51 AM   #31
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I have interacted with some youngish kids who are home schooled but wanted to make contact with university researchers like myself. Typically they just want 30 minutes or so for me to explain what I do. The kids seemed seemed to be quite advanced and well prepared, but the parents seemed a little pushy. At the point the kids were losing interest, which is when one needs to lighten up and let kids be kids, the parents were still going strong and expecting their kids to do the same. I worry about the long time effects of such educational hot-housing by parents, for I wonder if the precocious kids would eventually rebel in a major way.
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Old Jun 19, 2014, 11:29 AM   #32
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What about like interaction with the opposite (same?) sex? School was a great way to meet girls and I went to a Catholic high school, so they wore those kilts...
It must have been a Catholic school for rich kids, because the Catholic high school I went to didn't have a school uniform. It had no computers and only 2 electric typewriter, one of which was for office use only. This was back in the 80's so computers might not have commonplace in schools; but electric typewriters we as common as houseflies back then.

Still, it was a vastly superior experience to big budget public schools. Thanks to no distractions from idiot or bullies, I earned myself a free college education. My senior class had 30 students, total. Everyone of us scored in the top 10% in the nation on the SAT and ACT. Good GPA and scoring in the top 5% in nation was the only way this working class kid could afford college.
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Old Jun 19, 2014, 12:29 PM   #33
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Could not agree more. As an Ex Teacher, I can tell you that having involved/caring parents is very very important for the success of the child.
When my daughter attended private school, parent participation was required. The kids all excelled. I know that private schools don't compare to public but I liked seeing the parents participate. This year, I was in the school as a certified volunteer and was in the school about once a week. Out of 18 students, I only met three parents.
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Old Jun 19, 2014, 01:37 PM   #34
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Honestly, I have to agree with the "myth" that socialization is needed with kids, but it's beyond the whole having your kids play with other kids. I think that randomness and large population of diverse (color, religion, sexuality, socio-economic, etc) kids is what kids need.
That doesn't exactly happen in school either.

Haven't you ever seen "Heathers" or "The Breakfast Club"?

Kids branch off into cliques and tend to stay there for a big part of their high school years. In most parts of the nation the kids you see in kindergarten are the same people you see in HS.

This is a big part of why I take issue with school zones.

"Diversity" tends to not be a part of people's lives till they join the workforce or college
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Old Jun 19, 2014, 02:57 PM   #35
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That doesn't exactly happen in school either.

Haven't you ever seen "Heathers" or "The Breakfast Club"?

Kids branch off into cliques and tend to stay there for a big part of their high school years. In most parts of the nation the kids you see in kindergarten are the same people you see in HS.

This is a big part of why I take issue with school zones.

"Diversity" tends to not be a part of people's lives till they join the workforce or college
One, those are just movies. I was the quiet brainy girl in school and my friends ranged all over the spectrum.

Granted, until high school I wasn't in any school longer than a year (step-father was a Marine, so we tended to move a lot). So I tended to be more transient with friendships.

But, watching my younger cousins, who have been in the same school system from K-12, they tend to have a diverse set of friends. On top of that, my interactions with homeschooled kids (it's popular here in southeastern Ohio), they tend to be socially stunted, bordering on almost autistic in nature.
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Old Jun 21, 2014, 07:33 AM   #36
jnpy!$4g3cwk
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On top of that, my interactions with homeschooled kids (it's popular here in southeastern Ohio), they tend to be socially stunted, bordering on almost autistic in nature.
It could be because their parents are young-earth creationists.

But, it could also be because many of those kids actually were "somewhere on the autistic spectrum", Asperger's, etc., and, homeschooling was the best alternative. Here is an article from the Wired archive:

http://archive.wired.com/wired/archi...ergers_pr.html
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Old Aug 13, 2014, 04:23 PM   #37
Macs4u
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Hi,

We homeschool our kids, well my wife does whilst i work. Social aspect is a myth as our kids socialise just as much, just with a wider audience. The one thing we have noticed is that local kids do try and bully but its easily sorted. We felt that locked in a stuffy classroom working to the pace of the least bright child was not the best way to learn. Our kids holiday a few times a year and really get to experience different cultures.

We wouldn't change it for the world, our kids are flying (my youngest is just turned 5 and can read pretty much anything and can add up basic maths, write basic words and can certainly debate lol). My eldest who is 9, was getting really irritated and bored as he is very bright and was being held back in school. He's 9 and can read/write fluent and can do all his times tables. My middle child who is 7 is pretty much the same as my eldest.

I think its better than school.

Matt
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Old Aug 13, 2014, 11:28 PM   #38
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Regardless if you child is in public school, private school or home school the primary teacher for your child is YOU. I know that people disagree with this and come up with all sorts of excuses but it is true. The teacher only has your child as a student for 160-180 days per year and only for a few hours each day. The teacher has 18-22 children during that time. You on the other hand have your child 365 days per year.

Teachers are expected to do all the teaching and this is a huge failing. When a student fails in school it is the fault of the PARENT, not the teacher. I don't care how busy you are, it is a matter of prioritizing.

Math is the same for all ages and in all languages. Do you have your child help you with the grocery shopping? Figure the sales tax? How about calculate the square footage in their room?

Language arts? We use them every day. Do you make sure that your child knows the difference between well and good? These things are YOUR job as a parent. Everything is a learning experience. Thanks to Google we as parents don't have to make up the answers any longer, we can look them up.

History? Do you drive by the markers on the side of the road without even pausing? Why not stop and read it with your kids?

Physical Education? Who taught your child how to play baseball and the rules of the game? Football? Basketball? Tetherball?

Science? Who explained how to freeze water to your child? When water boils? Explained why it becomes night?

Everything we do each and every day involves education. We just have to take that time to teach our children. We cannot expect teachers to do it all. I'm very active in my child's school. So active that I'm sure the teacher probably wished that I was less active but she didn't complain because she never had to purchase copy paper, white board markers or certain other supplies all year when other teachers found themselves short.

Become a certified volunteer at your kid's school but remember, the best thing you can do is take responsibility for educating your child.
Something we both agree on.
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