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Old Dec 9, 2010, 12:24 PM   #1
dqpassat
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Help with Ethernet in house

Just moved to a new rental home and I'm trying to get my macs networked and all. Cable/internet guy just came and installed cable modem in patch panel (is that what it's called? panel is master closet upstairs with all sorts of wires coming out).

This is a fairly new home (2000) and there are 2 orange ethernet jacks throughout the house. One upstairs and one downstairs. My previous home had a similar set up and all I had do was plug all the ethernet cables at the patch panel to the cable modem and I had instant ethernet all over the house.

In this new rental the 2 ethernet cables (as I'm told by the cable installer) have no end caps (is that what they are called? so I can plug into router), but are attached to some panelůsee attached photo.

How the heck to I plug these into my router to get ethernet working at the 2 ethernet jacks??

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Old Dec 9, 2010, 12:40 PM   #2
EvilC5
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looks like a punchdown block for phones, but I dont have an answer to your actual question.
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Old Dec 9, 2010, 12:43 PM   #3
belvdr
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Rather than try to debug this from one picture, I'd ask the owner of the building. I'm sure they have some insight into how this wired. I'm thinking they may have it wired for voice, not data.
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Old Dec 9, 2010, 01:48 PM   #4
dmmcintyre3
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There should be a bunch of ethernet ports on another side where you plug the switch into. If not ask the building owner.
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Old Dec 9, 2010, 06:59 PM   #5
hmmfe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dqpassat View Post
Just moved to a new rental home and I'm trying to get my macs networked and all... Any help would be greatly appreciated.
The photo is a 110 block. Technically, a 110 block will support voice and data but it really depends on how you punch it down.

As others have said, I really can't say for sure how things are connected by the limited photo. But, if you don't care about voice to the two locations you mentioned you can simply pull the cables off the C-clips and terminate using an 8P8C (I am assuming the 2 blue cables are what you are referring to?). If you have never done this before and really don't care to do it in the future, just hire someone to do it. 4 terminations should take all of 15 minutes tops.

If you can take more pictures and post - we might be able to tell more. Really, though, get a guy out there that knows something about cabling and you should be fixed up in no time.

Last edited by hmmfe; Dec 9, 2010 at 07:00 PM. Reason: Typos and other stuff
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Old Dec 10, 2010, 05:31 AM   #6
blacka4
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yup thats a punch down for voice and it can be used for data..but I bet its not. better to go ask the building manager or owner to see how it was wired
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Old Dec 10, 2010, 06:06 AM   #7
miles01110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hmmfe View Post
The photo is a 110 block. Technically, a 110 block will support voice and data but it really depends on how you punch it down.
Correct. Specifically, it really only supports data for 10/100BaseT networks. Gigabit networks will bleed too much and you will lose performance.

Quote:
But, if you don't care about voice to the two locations you mentioned you can simply pull the cables off the C-clips and terminate using an 8P8C (I am assuming the 2 blue cables are what you are referring to?). If you have never done this before and really don't care to do it in the future, just hire someone to do it. 4 terminations should take all of 15 minutes tops.
For CAT-5 you only need the white blue / blue white and white orange/orange white wires in positions 1, 2, 3, and 6 on the jack, respectively. The only thing that really prevents you from putting them in a jack yourself is lack of a crimper, which tend to be a little expensive to own one yourself if you don't do this frequently.
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Old Dec 10, 2010, 12:40 PM   #8
hmmfe
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Originally Posted by miles01110 View Post
Correct. Specifically, it really only supports data for 10/100BaseT networks. Gigabit networks will bleed too much and you will lose performance.



For CAT-5 you only need the white blue / blue white and white orange/orange white wires in positions 1, 2, 3, and 6 on the jack, respectively. The only thing that really prevents you from putting them in a jack yourself is lack of a crimper, which tend to be a little expensive to own one yourself if you don't do this frequently.
Since we're getting all technical... no, there are Cat5e and CAT6 rated 110 blocks that do support gigabit Ethernet. I doubt the block in the photo is such a block but the photo is not clear enough to tell.

Exceedingly bad practice to start splitting pairs unless there aren't other options. Once you go down the gigabit Ethernet path and PoE, you will/may need the additional pairs. Also, 568A (used mostly in residential installations) pinouts would be pins 1,2,3&6 using white green/green and white orange/orange respectively. In either 568A or 568B, pin 4 is blue and pin 5 is white/blue and not used in older Ethernet terminations (though I still recommend terminating all 4 pairs).

Now on to less pedantic endeavors...

Last edited by hmmfe; Dec 13, 2010 at 04:01 PM. Reason: typos and additional thoughts
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Old Dec 10, 2010, 08:40 PM   #9
mh530
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Nobody has said it yet-
They make cables that will sit on top of your 110 block and jump to a patch cable with a RJ45 on the other end...you could then plug these into your switch/router. Might be the easiest and least expensive way out.

This is the first item that came up in a search:
http://www.cablestogo.com/product_list.asp?cat_id=3509
You may be able to get them for less if you shop around.
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Old Dec 13, 2010, 05:59 AM   #10
belvdr
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Nobody has said it yet-
They make cables that will sit on top of your 110 block and jump to a patch cable with a RJ45 on the other end...you could then plug these into your switch/router. Might be the easiest and least expensive way out.

This is the first item that came up in a search:
http://www.cablestogo.com/product_list.asp?cat_id=3509
You may be able to get them for less if you shop around.
Sure you can do that, and you'll kick yourself in the rear end down the road. It makes for a nightmare when you are upgrading/moving equipment later on.
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Old Dec 13, 2010, 06:31 AM   #11
miles01110
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Originally Posted by hmmfe View Post
Since we're getting all technical... no, there are Cat5e and CAT6 rated 110 blocks that do support gigabit Ethernet.
"Support" in the loosest sense of the word; meaning they perform better than standard 10/100-rated blocks, but are still hateful for Gigabit. There are plenty of other places to bottleneck your throughput without using a 110/66 block to do it.
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Old Dec 13, 2010, 04:04 PM   #12
hmmfe
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Originally Posted by miles01110 View Post
"Support" in the loosest sense of the word; meaning they perform better than standard 10/100-rated blocks, but are still hateful for Gigabit. There are plenty of other places to bottleneck your throughput without using a 110/66 block to do it.
Sorry to be blunt and nothing personal and all that, but your above comment is simply incorrect.
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