Register FAQ / Rules Forum Spy Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Go Back   MacRumors Forums > Apple Systems and Services > Programming > Mac Programming

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old May 19, 2011, 05:07 PM   #1
larswik
macrumors 65816
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
My Last Pascal Class and Final Test

Monday I had my final test in my Pascal class and got an over all C grade in the class which I am happy with. I am very happy with the help I got here from you folks and that I took the class. I would have gotten a better grade but I lost my book 5 weeks ago and the replacement book was the wrong one so it took a few weeks to get it back. By that time I was kind of lost in the Multi Dimensional Arrays and Records (Data Structures). I still think I could have learned more from that class but I am happy.

I signed up for the Java class for the fall season to get an introduction to object oriented programming. But this summer I want to start with Objective-C and I was thinking one of these 2 books

1. Learn Objective-C on the Mac
or
2. Cocoa Programming for the Mac (Hillegass)

I read Learn C on the Mac end of last year so it is a natural step to the second book. But I also want to get some Cocoa under my belt.

Which is best do you think?

Thanks again for all your help!

-Lars
larswik is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old May 19, 2011, 06:47 PM   #2
chrono1081
macrumors 604
 
chrono1081's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Isla Nublar
Quote:
Originally Posted by larswik View Post
Monday I had my final test in my Pascal class and got an over all C grade in the class which I am happy with. I am very happy with the help I got here from you folks and that I took the class. I would have gotten a better grade but I lost my book 5 weeks ago and the replacement book was the wrong one so it took a few weeks to get it back. By that time I was kind of lost in the Multi Dimensional Arrays and Records (Data Structures). I still think I could have learned more from that class but I am happy.

I signed up for the Java class for the fall season to get an introduction to object oriented programming. But this summer I want to start with Objective-C and I was thinking one of these 2 books

1. Learn Objective-C on the Mac
or
2. Cocoa Programming for the Mac (Hillegass)

I read Learn C on the Mac end of last year so it is a natural step to the second book. But I also want to get some Cocoa under my belt.

Which is best do you think?

Thanks again for all your help!

-Lars
Start with Objective-C first. Learn Objective-C on the Mac is decent but I like Steve Kochans book better. Cocoa Programming is a hard book, as is any Big Nerd Ranch book (although excellent). You will want to get good at Objective-C before you touch Cocoa.
__________________
Mac Pro (2010): 3.33Ghz Intel Xeon (6 core) - 24 GB RAM - NVidia Quadro k5000
Macbook Air (2010): 2.13 Ghz Intel Core 2 Duo - 4GB RAM
chrono1081 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old May 19, 2011, 07:24 PM   #3
balamw
Moderator
 
balamw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: New England, USA
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrono1081 View Post
Start with Objective-C first. Learn Objective-C on the Mac is decent but I like Steve Kochans book better. Cocoa Programming is a hard book, as is any Big Nerd Ranch book (although excellent). You will want to get good at Objective-C before you touch Cocoa.
I agree with chrono1081, even though you tried Kochan before, it may make more sense to you now why he approaches things in the way he does.

I haven't been through the whole book, but from what I have seen "Learn Obective C 2.0 on the Mac" presents much less material in a more superficial way than Kochan. You could certainly try that and then come back to Kochan after "Learn Obj. C."

I would only recommend Hillegass once you can master the first part of Kochan.

B
__________________
MBA (13" 1.7 GHz 128GB), UMBP (15" SD 2.8 GHz), UMB (13" 2.4 GHz), iMac (17" Yonah), 32GB iPad 3 WiFi+LTE, 64 GB iPad WiFi, 32 GB iPhone 5, Airport Extreme
balamw is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old May 19, 2011, 07:31 PM   #4
smithrh
macrumors 68000
 
smithrh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
I am somewhat distressed to hear the Pascal is still taught, much less in existence.

Hopefully things are better now, but Pascal managed to give me something like 10,000 warnings/errors on a single typo in a 20-line program. A very harsh mistress indeed with few redeeming qualities.
smithrh is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old May 19, 2011, 10:55 PM   #5
larswik
Thread Starter
macrumors 65816
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
One of the things I liked about the Learn C on the Mac was it was straight forward and fun to read. I years ago I try to start with Kochan book and I found it long, wordy and really dry. When I got to Self and Pointer's I put the book down.

The Pascal class was great. Instead of learning at my own pace it gave me structure and pushed me every week. I am surprised that it is so obsolete and frowned upon. Turbo Pascal is an object oriented language and it seemed to very close to C with different syntax. I remember reading about Functions in C but Pascal had Functions and Procedures you could use. Data Structures, MD arrays. If someone could tell me the big difference from C to Pascal that would be great.

You guys talked me into it. I will start with the Learn Objective-C on Mac book. Like Balamw said, things might make more sence to me now after reading the C book and taking the Pascal class. Plus, if I get lost I got you guys!!!

-Lars
larswik is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old May 20, 2011, 03:01 AM   #6
jiminaus
macrumors 65816
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Sydney
There's also Learn Cocoa on the Mac (2nd ed) if you like this series. You might want to consider it before Hillegass and/or Kochan.

Note that Learn Objective-C on the Mac only covers Objective-C 1.0. You'll miss out on learning about garbage collection, properties and fast enumeration, which were all introduced in Objective-C 2.0 with Mac OS X 10.5. But you'll pick those up pretty quickly, I think.
jiminaus is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old May 20, 2011, 02:41 PM   #7
larswik
Thread Starter
macrumors 65816
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
I did not now that it only covered OB-C 1.0, thanks. I started the book last night but maybe I will look around. I know that I do not want the Kochan book.The beautiful thing about the Apress Learn C book was it was short and to the point. This made it easier to learn in less time since I also work a 9 to 5 job.

Thanks for the suggestion.

-Lars
larswik is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2011, 02:50 PM   #8
dasein
macrumors member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrono1081 View Post
Start with Objective-C first. Learn Objective-C on the Mac is decent but I like Steve Kochans book better. Cocoa Programming is a hard book, as is any Big Nerd Ranch book (although excellent). You will want to get good at Objective-C before you touch Cocoa.
Kochan's current edition is getting out of sync with upgrades in the SDK. He's got a newer third edition due out around June or July.. same name I think. It is a good text and he has a website/forum as well.
dasein is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2011, 03:16 PM   #9
balamw
Moderator
 
balamw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: New England, USA
Quote:
Originally Posted by dasein View Post
Kochan's current edition is getting out of sync with upgrades in the SDK. He's got a newer third edition due out around June or July.. same name I think. It is a good text and he has a website/forum as well.
End of June. He was just by recently visiting this other thread about the 3rd ed. http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1074453

B
__________________
MBA (13" 1.7 GHz 128GB), UMBP (15" SD 2.8 GHz), UMB (13" 2.4 GHz), iMac (17" Yonah), 32GB iPad 3 WiFi+LTE, 64 GB iPad WiFi, 32 GB iPhone 5, Airport Extreme
balamw is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2011, 07:13 PM   #10
certsoft
macrumors member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by smithrh View Post
Hopefully things are better now, but Pascal managed to give me something like 10,000 warnings/errors on a single typo in a 20-line program. A very harsh mistress indeed with few redeeming qualities.
That's a function of the compiler, not the language. Pascal and C provide the same utility, C is just Pascal's retarded cousin.
certsoft is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old May 21, 2011, 08:21 PM   #11
Sydde
macrumors 68000
 
Sydde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Quote:
Originally Posted by certsoft View Post
... C is just Pascal's retarded cousin.
I think you are confusing Developmental Disability with Asperger Syndrome. Autistic people may be a challenge to train, but once you do, they are usually far better at a specific task than normies.
__________________
You got to be a spirit. You can't be no ghost.
Sydde is offline   1 Reply With Quote

Reply
MacRumors Forums > Apple Systems and Services > Programming > Mac Programming

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Had my Pascal class today larswik Mac Programming 6 Apr 26, 2011 03:34 AM
My Pascal Lab class and now java? larswik Mac Programming 11 Feb 25, 2011 09:58 AM
I'm struggling Pascal class larswik Mac Programming 13 Feb 12, 2011 06:57 PM
My Pascal Class larswik Mac Programming 36 Jan 27, 2011 11:43 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:27 PM.

Mac Rumors | Mac | iPhone | iPhone Game Reviews | iPhone Apps

Mobile Version | Fixed | Fluid | Fluid HD
Copyright 2002-2013, MacRumors.com, LLC