Register FAQ / Rules Forum Spy Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Go Back   MacRumors Forums > Special Interests > Visual Media > Digital Photography

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old Nov 17, 2012, 11:33 PM   #1
ijohn.8.80
macrumors 65816
 
ijohn.8.80's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Adelaide, Oztwaylya.
Programs for photo-stitching / panoramas

Howdy All,

I'd like to explore the Brenizer method a little and am wondering if any of you can suggest what program (for mac obviously) to use for such complex photo-stitching?

I tried a few thirty five shot panoramas with photoshop and it just doesn't quite make it! There's always one or two errors with complex or regularly patterned background areas.

Is the secret to success keeping the background relatively simple, with no regular patterns as such?

Thanks for any suggestions.
John
__________________
YouTube is not the resurrection of Dada

Last edited by ijohn.8.80; Nov 18, 2012 at 10:45 PM.
ijohn.8.80 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Nov 19, 2012, 03:06 PM   #2
sflarc51
macrumors newbie
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Timing

Never heard of this method until I saw your post. Then I happen to visit a frequent site of mine, photographylife.com, and what do you know, they had an article on it sitting right in front of my face!
http://photographylife.com/advanced-...ethod-panorama
sflarc51 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Nov 19, 2012, 09:33 PM   #3
paolo-
macrumors 6502a
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
I found that sometimes it's only one or two image that Photoshop can't align and that throws the whole panorama out the window.

I find that if the initial panorama fails, try starting with the pictures around the in focus element. Then save that as a tiff file. Try building from there with a new panoramas and add some of the pictures around that initial part and saving. You'll probably find which image fails every thing. You can then manually place that image in and then add the rest with the panorama function. It's a bit of a pain when it doesn't work.

I also found that when you have too many pictures and you have a few that are superfluous, Photoshop throws a hissy fit. I also found that when the background isn't busy enough, Photoshop doesn't know where to put things.


For example, on this test I did, the two pictures that made up the part to the right of the shed wouldn't get into place with photomerge. There was some repetition in those two pictures and it's not like there's a whole lot going on in there.
paolo- is online now   1 Reply With Quote
Old Nov 20, 2012, 04:24 AM   #4
ijohn.8.80
Thread Starter
macrumors 65816
 
ijohn.8.80's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Adelaide, Oztwaylya.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sflarc51 View Post
Never heard of this method until I saw your post. Then I happen to visit a frequent site of mine, photographylife.com, and what do you know, they had an article on it sitting right in front of my face!
http://photographylife.com/advanced-...ethod-panorama
I had read that article over the weekend, they only suggest photoshop to stitch it together with, but thanks for the link, I'm sure it may well help others to investigate this technique.

Quote:
Originally Posted by paolo- View Post
I found that sometimes it's only one or two image that Photoshop can't align and that throws the whole panorama out the window.

I find that if the initial panorama fails, try starting with the pictures around the in focus element. Then save that as a tiff file. Try building from there with a new panoramas and add some of the pictures around that initial part and saving. You'll probably find which image fails every thing. You can then manually place that image in and then add the rest with the panorama function. It's a bit of a pain when it doesn't work.

I also found that when you have too many pictures and you have a few that are superfluous, Photoshop throws a hissy fit. I also found that when the background isn't busy enough, Photoshop doesn't know where to put things.


For example, on this test I did, the two pictures that made up the part to the right of the shed wouldn't get into place with photomerge. There was some repetition in those two pictures and it's not like there's a whole lot going on in there.
Thumb resize.
I like the shot of the football on the arm of the chair! It's with items of all manner and type that I'll be using the technique, not people.

I had arrived at almost this same method for construction that you suggested above through trial and error over the last couple of days! Build the object or item of focus first, then work other block shaped sections together, then stitch them all together at the end. That gives me the best results in photoshop CS6 thus far. Trying to put together rows or columns doesn't work very well in photoshop.

Has anyone tried PTGui Pro, Calico 2.1 or Hugin? These were the other programs I could find recommended elsewhere for this sort of panoramic photo-stitching.
__________________
YouTube is not the resurrection of Dada
ijohn.8.80 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Nov 20, 2012, 10:11 AM   #5
BillMidwest
macrumors newbie
 
Join Date: May 2011
I've used Hugin for several years with very good results. Calico is also an excellent program, however only the trial version is available. See his website for more info.*
Hugin does allow you to manually make numerous adjustments to a panorama if it's not acceptable, or if you wish to experiment, and the tutorials are very good. Give it a try.
BillMidwest is offline   1 Reply With Quote
Old Nov 20, 2012, 10:15 AM   #6
joelk2
macrumors regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillMidwest View Post
I've used Hugin for several years with very good results. Calico is also an excellent program, however only the trial version is available. See his website for more info.*
Hugin does allow you to manually make numerous adjustments to a panorama if it's not acceptable, or if you wish to experiment, and the tutorials are very good. Give it a try.
i would second the above for Hugin

http://hugin.sourceforge.net/

its great and free which is a bonus.

the brenizer method when done correctly can produce so amazingly shallow dof photos.
__________________
IMac 2011 21.5" - Ipad Mini 16gb - Iphone 4 x 2 - ATV2 - Ipad 2 32gb
joelk2 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Nov 23, 2012, 01:11 PM   #7
Richard Peters
macrumors regular
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: London, UK
I use AutoPano Pro.

Hands down the best solution I've used for image stitching
__________________
My photography portfolios | blog | 500px
Richard Peters is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Nov 23, 2012, 02:10 PM   #8
TonyK
macrumors 6502
 
Join Date: May 2009
Hugin at one time was just a front-end to PanoTools. I've used PanoTools with a different GUI and with Hugin and will say I like the way it works. These days PanoTools is compiled in to Hugin.

Looking at AutoPano Pro it looks like it would do a great job too.
TonyK is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Nov 23, 2012, 02:39 PM   #9
apple-ette
macrumors member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
I've used DoubleTake with success a few times.
apple-ette is offline   0 Reply With Quote

Reply
MacRumors Forums > Special Interests > Visual Media > Digital Photography

Tags
brenizer method, photo-stitching, stitching

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Similar Threads
thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Photo Booth , Finder and other programs not opening up jerseykid80 Mac Basics and Help 1 May 3, 2014 01:51 AM
Post Your Panoramas/Walls sawah iOS 7 8 Nov 10, 2013 04:00 PM
How About Some Panoramas? pmxperience Digital Photography 37 Jan 23, 2013 11:24 AM
Take panoramas from right to left! SheepNutz iOS 6 54 Oct 13, 2012 09:53 PM
Import Photo AND Video from SDCard - separate programs WambleJ Mac Basics and Help 3 Aug 26, 2012 11:02 PM

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:27 AM.

Mac Rumors | Mac | iPhone | iPhone Game Reviews | iPhone Apps

Mobile Version | Fixed | Fluid | Fluid HD
Copyright 2002-2013, MacRumors.com, LLC