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Old Mar 17, 2013, 11:37 AM   #1
scottw324
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iPhoto pic library location

Sorry I am a relatively new Mac mini owner and I am still trying to figure some of the differences out between the Mac system and Windows 7 system. In windows 7 when I download my pictures or import my pictures from my iPhone into the computer, it wuld ask me where I want them to be stored. It would save them to a folder on the HDD.

With iPhoto though I am not sure where it is saving the files to. I want to be able to copy the videos and pics to a cd or USB drive to send to my parents but not sure where to find them.

Any help would be helpful.

Thank you very much.
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Old Mar 17, 2013, 07:24 PM   #2
switon
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RE: iPhoto Masters...

Hi scottw324,

This link describes how to find the original images inside the iPhoto Library:
http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1554775

Regards,
Switon
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Old Mar 17, 2013, 08:28 PM   #3
talmy
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You really don't want to go into the iPhoto library. Instead just export from iPhoto. It's really easy that way and you get to resize the image while you are at it.
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Old Mar 17, 2013, 09:25 PM   #4
switon
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RE: those original images in iPhoto...

Hi,

Let me express an opinion, and a warning, and perhaps dispel unnecessary fears...

I've heard several individuals say that one "should not go inside the iPhoto Library ever". I'd like to qualify these statements.

First of all, the iPhoto Library is nothing more than a directory and its subdirectories. Yes, there is as a database and thumbnails in other subdirectories, but the original images themselves are just ordinary files stored in a subdirectory of the lead iPhoto Library directory. As such, these photos can be manipulated by any terminal command. What one does not want to do is to delete or rename or otherwise alter the original images, as then they will not be properly represented by thumbnails and in the database. But...one can most certainly copy the original images to another location using standard shell commands without causing any troubles whatsoever. For instance, you might wish to copy all of the images in your entire iPhoto Library to a networked Windows partition. In this case, I would use the "rsync" command to perform the copy of the images, preserving the date-based directory structure as well as ownerships, permissions, timestamps, etc.

So, if you are confident that you can view and perform actions on the directory of original images without changing that directory (and subdirectories, of course), then there is nothing wrong with "going inside" the iPhoto Library. If, however, you are not confident that you can view or copy the original image files without deleting or renaming them, then by all means do not "go inside" the iPhoto Library. Basically, what I'm trying to say is that the original images are stored as normal files (copies of the original) in normal directories, and, as such, can be viewed and copied by standard terminal commands. The iPhoto app has not altered these files in any way. For instance, if you download photos from a Canon camera into iPhoto, the original raw photos (IMG_xxxx.CR2) and original JPEG files (IMG_xxxx.JPG) are in the iPhoto Library and you could even transfer these images back to the camera if you wish. They are simply stored in subdirectories whose names are timestamps.

Secondly, if you only wish to copy a handful of original images, then certainly you could export these images from iPhoto to your desktop or another folder, and use them from there. But doing so of course makes a second local copy of these image files. If you need to do this to 20,000 photos, then exporting all 20,000 images will mean that you have two local copies of them, taking up twice the disk space not to mention the time to export all of those photos. If you simply wish to copy the originals to a Windows drive, then using rsync does not require the intermediate second exported copy of the images. In addition, using rsync does a differential copy, so if you have already made a copy of all of your iPhoto images before, then you can rsync them again and only the new images will be copied over to the Windows drive. If you do the copy instead by exporting the images, and you wish to update your export, then you will have to export just the new images and not the old images. Depending upon how you organize your photos, this may be easy or difficult.

So, in a nutshell, there is nothing "special" to get you into trouble inside the iPhoto Library's Masters directory, as long as you are comfortable with handling file using standard Terminal commands. What you don't want to do is to delete any of the originals...(and even if you did, not all is lost as you could always rsync from the copy back to the iPhoto Library to replace the accidentally deleted originals.

...just my opinion...and, to back it up, I often "enter" my iPhoto Libraries (I have over 50 of them) and view or copy the original images, and I've never experienced any problems from doing so --- iPhoto continues to work as expected...

Regards,
Switon
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Old Mar 17, 2013, 10:04 PM   #5
aristobrat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by talmy View Post
You really don't want to go into the iPhoto library. Instead just export from iPhoto. It's really easy that way and you get to resize the image while you are at it.
x2.

Personally, I would create an Album called "Parents MM/DD/YY", then drag a copy of all of the pictures and videos I wanted to export into it. When I got everything in it, I'd export the album.

I see no advantage into manually finding originals within the iPhoto Library. It's tedious to browse through the internal folders, as the names rarely correlate to what you're looking for. And while there's a good chance you won't dick anything up (if you know what you're doing), I've seen tons of threads here on MacRumors over the last eight years from users who have accidentally corrupted their libraries by simply trying to copy files out of them. I think that's precisely why since iPhoto '08, the iPhoto Library has been "hidden" as a package that simply opens iPhoto if you double-click on it. With all versions of iPhoto before that, you could simply browse into the iPhoto Library folders easily, which got some people in trouble.

scottw324, when I switched from Windows (where I had been manually organizing my photos by folders for years), I realllllly hated iPhoto. But after awhile of playing around with it (like rating my photos, assigning keywords, adding faces and places, etc), it became so flexible with organizing my photos that I could never go back to using folders again. So if it's frustrating you, hopefully you get a chance to really play around with it, and maybe it'll surprise you.
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Old Mar 18, 2013, 03:55 AM   #6
scottw324
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Thank you all for your input. I sounds like it isn't too difficult to manage my pictures, just a different method than I have been using over there years in windows. So I will have to adapt to it. There have been some good suggestions though in this thread and the other thread that was posted earlier and now that I have a slightly better understanding on how to use iPhoto I think I can accomplish what I wanted to do.

Yes the old Windows folder was a pain to find anything but it was a simple method. Same steps as saving a Word or Excel doc so fairly simple. I was just getting frustrated with iPhoto because it acted so different from my previous experience. I like it, just having a hard time with some of it's functions.

I might need to look into getting a Mac for Dummies book.
I have figured out how to use a lot of different things on it already, mostly for itunes content streaming to my TVs which is what it does mostly but slowly figureing everything else out as well.

Thank you all very much for your help. I really appreciate it.
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Old Mar 18, 2013, 09:13 AM   #7
talmy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by talmy View Post
You really don't want to go into the iPhoto library.
Quote:
Originally Posted by switon View Post
I've heard several individuals say that one "should not go inside the iPhoto Library ever". I'd like to qualify these statements.
In case you thought I was one of those individuals, I stand by what I said to a new Mac user. Learn to use the tools that are provided (in this case iPhoto and it's way of organizing photos, creating albums, and exporting) first. Going inside the iPhoto library just complicates matters and opens up the possibility for making irreversible mistakes that a new user is more likely to do.
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Old Mar 18, 2013, 07:02 PM   #8
switon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by talmy View Post
In case you thought I was one of those individuals, I stand by what I said to a new Mac user. Learn to use the tools that are provided (in this case iPhoto and it's way of organizing photos, creating albums, and exporting) first. Going inside the iPhoto library just complicates matters and opens up the possibility for making irreversible mistakes that a new user is more likely to do.
Hi talmy,

Yes, I both agree and disagree with your remarks...please let me explain.

Basically, I'm a little concerned with what I might wish to call "fear mongering" tactics that some (and I'm not referring to you, so please don't take me wrong) espouse to posters when they ask a question on how to do something. While it is true the OP said he was relatively new to the Mac, he also referred to Windows 7 implying that he was not new to computers. I just did not wish to make any assumptions about his experience with computers, so if he asks how to view/copy original images out of iPhoto, I supplied the answer for 2 reasons: (1) the iPhoto Library in conjunction with Finder attempts to "hide" its contents, but (2) in fact this is a collusion between Finder and iPhoto, the actual iPhoto Library is nothing more than a standard unix directory with subdirectories containing the original image files, just like the OP's folders of original images on his Windows 7 machine.. There is nothing special about the iPhoto Library, meaning that if you do any standard terminal commands, such as ls or cp or rsync, you will find just the standard unix directory structure and the commands work as expected. So, while the OP was new to Macs, he was potentially not new to computers and, as such, asked a question that suggested that he had done similar standard commands on directories containing image files under Windows 7 and just wanted to know how to perform the same feats under Mac OS.

This is just my thinking with regards to this OP's query.

Now, with respect to my other worry...I have seen several individuals (again, I'm not referring to you) strike what I consider to be unnecessary fear in new users, suggesting that the Mac OS is too complex for them and they will get into trouble if they use it beyond what the GUI provides. I know I'm old school, and I'm probably on a crusade to change the this type of thinking by suggesting that there is nothing to fear in using standard shell commands --- sorry for that, but this is my opinion. Sometimes, the shell really is the best way of getting certain things done. And if you are trying to administer any servers, then the shell is almost mandatory as the Server.app GUI does not provide an interface to all of the configuration commands that one needs to fully administer servers.

I apologize if you thought I was being disrespectful, I assure you that was not my purpose.

Respectfully,
Switon
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Old Mar 18, 2013, 09:35 PM   #9
Mike in Kansas
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I'd suggest you stay out of the iPhoto Library particularly if you actually EDIT your photos (crop, enhance, lighten, etc.). Once you edit a photo, a version with the edits is kept in a different place than the original. So unless you want to remember exactly what photos you edited, and know if you should copy them from the Original folders or the Modified folder, it's just easier (and less accident prone) to access the photos through the iPhoto interface as intended (and export them when needed) versus digging around the library.
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