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Old Jun 22, 2013, 12:14 PM   #1
chrono1081
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Paula Deen Fired - I guess its not always better with butter...

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The 66-year-old Savannah kitchen celebrity has been swamped in controversy since court documents filed this week revealed Deen told an attorney questioning her under oath last month that she has used the N-word. "Yes, of course," Deen said, though she added, "It's been a very long time."

The Food Network, which made Deen a star with "Paula's Home Cooking" in 2002 and later "Paula's Home Cooking" in 2008, weighed in with a terse statement Friday afternoon.

"Food Network will not renew Paula Deen's contract when it expires at the end of this month," the statement said. Network representatives declined further comment. A representative for Deen did not immediately return phone and email messages seeking comment on the decision.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/0...n_3480517.html

Although I see where Food Network is coming from, I think she should have been given a second chance. Sometimes people need something like this to happen for them to change their stance on something they do.
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Old Jun 22, 2013, 12:25 PM   #2
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I think after the diabetes debacle she's already had her second chance. And this isn't about giving her a chance or not. It's about whether having her on is good for Food Network's brand or isn't.
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Old Jun 22, 2013, 03:44 PM   #3
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The Southern thing just got old, two Y'alls in every sentence. Her early recipes were cringeworthy, but at least they were fun and regional.
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Old Jun 22, 2013, 04:29 PM   #4
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Shes a multimillionaire, she should just shut up, and go quietly into that good night
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Old Jun 22, 2013, 07:24 PM   #5
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Her shtick was getting old and the Food Network got lucky that she shot herself in the foot.
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Old Jun 22, 2013, 09:50 PM   #6
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I'd like to know how long ago she used it.
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Old Jun 23, 2013, 01:23 AM   #7
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I'd like to know how long ago she used it.
Reading a few articles on it, it sounds like it was roughly 30 years ago in a private conversation. But it was in talking to somebody about it in 2007 that prompted this lawsuit. It was the deposition in that lawsuit that caught Food Network's attention. But some questions remain:

Why rehash something that happened 30 years ago?

Why wait 6 years before filing a suit regarding it?

The statement, as I read it, concerned wedding planning and having a "southern plantation style" wedding, fitting with that time (you can figure out the rest from there). Also, my understanding is that this has to do with racial discrimination. What and where is the relation between her comments and the suit?

If this happened 30 years ago, and Deen has indeed apologized and atoned for her words, why bring it up now to the point that her contract doesn't get renewed? (She didn't get fired; Food Network opted to not renew her contract at the end of this month.)

So many missing pieces here that some of this makes absolutely no sense. Food Network is obviously being PC about it, but let's face it: Would someone like Sherman Helmsley get treated the same way (sacked from a network) from all the remarks he said on The Jeffersons? What about Carroll O'Connor? Would Archie Bunker be too much for a network to get past, or would everything he did on In the Heat of the Night make up for it?

As for the "y'all" thing.. You should have seen Down Home with the Neely's. They used it just as much as Deen.

Speaking of Deen, this makes you wonder about Bobby Deen's contract, since Food Network owns the Cooking Channel, where Bobby stars in Not my Momma's Meals.

Finally, look at where she was born and raised, as well as the time she was raised. Then ask the common sense question: Did you really not expect this? Really? If I got called that by kids in southern Oklahoma in 1983 when I was 9, what makes you think that that isn't going to be in someone's head let alone used during the time she was growing up? Believe it or not, but there is still a lot of pent up anger about everything from Reconstruction to the Civil Rights era down there that hasn't been dealt with. People say that they are over it, but here again, some of it shows its ugly head.

I digressed; back to Deen. A hell of a lot worse has happened to other people on broadcast TV, and have gotten away with it. To bring up something like this and make a lawsuit out of it is really petty. And again, this brings up the double standard with the N-Word that needs to be addressed in US society.

Full Disclosure: I'm a Black guy, and have been on the receiving end of that word many a day, and still hear my relatives use it, much to my dismay. Luckily, I've taken the high road and avoided all conversation about it outside of telling them that it's wrong and not to use it in front of my wife or children (wife is White; children are mixed). I can't control my relatives, but I can control what goes into my children's ears and vocabulary, and that word (among others) will never be one of them that slips through.

BL.

Last edited by bradl; Jun 23, 2013 at 01:50 AM. Reason: Disclaimer =/= Disclosure.
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Old Jun 23, 2013, 07:52 AM   #8
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bradl, I think yours is an extremely reasonable position -- although I cringe at the idea that you still hear that word in this day and age.

What Paula Deen said, she said years and years ago. People change. I accept her explanation at face value; therefore it seems stupid to fire her for an ignorant racial epithet she herself no longer uses or defends.

Now, if you told me that she still uses that word, or worse, doesn't like having black people on her staff or show, that'd be a whole other ballgame. But as far as I can tell, she's not that person.

And I'm really not a big defender of her. That "y'all" stuff gets really old, you know?
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Old Jun 23, 2013, 01:51 PM   #9
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If it was 30 years ago, then this is ridiculous.
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Old Jun 23, 2013, 05:20 PM   #10
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If it was 30 years ago, then this is ridiculous.
It was, and it is. Think about it: Martha Stewart got sacked from 2 networks and put in jail for a White Collar crime (justifiably so). After she got out, she got hired back by two other networks, and is nearly as big now as she was before she went to jail.

Getting sacked by a network for a crime vs. something that happened 30 years ago. That's rather tacky and pathetic on the part of Food Network.

BL.
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Old Jun 23, 2013, 07:33 PM   #11
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It almost seems like they were looking for any excuse to get rid of her.
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Old Jun 23, 2013, 08:43 PM   #12
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It almost seems like they were looking for any excuse to get rid of her.
I see what you mean, but I'm not so sure.

If I remember right, she has 2, possibly 3 sons. One of them was already given a contract for the Cooking Channel, and has his own show. The other two just had their own show start up on Food Network. So if they were looking for a reason to get rid of her, having all of her children in tow on their own shows on Food Network, or another channel that they own, doesn't help things on the network's end..

BL.
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Old Jun 24, 2013, 10:44 AM   #13
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Wasn't there also something about her wanting to open a restaurant with slaves and servants?
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Old Jun 24, 2013, 11:20 AM   #14
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The first Deen show I saw was "The All-American Lunch", fries, a chocolate milk shake and a burger. Her use of ingredients was so far over the top...extra eggs and cream and sugar and...everything. It must have had 10,000 calories.

The Neelys weren't quite as bad, maybe lack of portion control was the worst they did, but they also used "Y'all" in a scripted way.

Both Deen and Mrs. Neely were horn dogs.
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Old Jun 24, 2013, 12:04 PM   #15
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Nobody cares what words she said 30 years ago. Anyone whining about this needs to get off their high horse and get a life.

They're just words... Some people's priorities are totally ****ed. These people must have absolutely hated the movie Django...
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Old Jun 24, 2013, 02:35 PM   #16
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I've never watched her shows and only have seen her briefly when she appeared as a guest on other shows. I don't care for her style or her menu.

As to the current brouhaha, what she said 30 years ago (presuming her claim is true) is irrelevant. What is relevant is the fact that she was dishonest when she continued to push her very unhealthy recipes and never admitted she had contracted type 2 diabetes until that cat got out of the bag.

The discrimination charges will be decided in the court.

Whatever, Food Network - like any other private enterprise - has no obligation to renew anyone's contract.
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Old Jun 24, 2013, 02:40 PM   #17
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As to the current brouhaha, what she said 30 years ago (presuming her claim is true) is irrelevant. What is relevant is the fact that she was dishonest when she continued to push her very unhealthy recipes and never admitted she had contracted type 2 diabetes until that cat got out of the bag.
If people in this country actually cared about that, we wouldn't have McDonalds, KFC, Dominos, etc on every street corner.
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Old Jun 24, 2013, 03:19 PM   #18
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If people in this country actually cared about that, we wouldn't have McDonalds, KFC, Dominos, etc on every street corner.
Some people do actually care about that and never visit fast food joints. Probably in the minority, but they still exist.

Edited to add that Smithfield just severed ties to Ms. Deen.
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Old Jun 24, 2013, 03:43 PM   #19
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I've never watched her shows and only have seen her briefly when she appeared as a guest on other shows. I don't care for her style or her menu.
This definitely shows, especially with regarding Bobby Deen. See below.

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As to the current brouhaha, what she said 30 years ago (presuming her claim is true) is irrelevant. What is relevant is the fact that she was dishonest when she continued to push her very unhealthy recipes and never admitted she had contracted type 2 diabetes until that cat got out of the bag.
Which has absolutely nothing to do with her ousting from Food Network, nor the discrimination charges.

In fact, I would say that the dishonesty you are referring to has been answered by Bobby Deen's show. I'd say that he is balancing it out with the premise of his show, which is to recreate the same recipes that she makes, but either with healthier ingredients or an entirely healthy variant of the recipe. Paula even visits the show to taste the finished dish to compare how it is to the original one.

I agree that what she said 30 years ago is irrelevant. She's made up for and atoned for it. Judge her as she is now, not as what she was back then. She was wrong and she knew it and made amends. There is absolutely no need for this other person with the lawsuit to keep holding that stigma over her head and ruin the progress that she made.

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The discrimination charges will be decided in the court.
Agreed. But the question people would like an answer to is why wait 6 years to bring this suit forward? This was 2007 that this deposition was made. The lawsuit is now. Why wait? Statute of Limitations? What could possibly require 6 years before action is taken?

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Whatever, Food Network - like any other private enterprise - has no obligation to renew anyone's contract.
No, they don't. But the problem here is that they stuck their nose in it and got their entire head muddy. They either have the choice of staying PC and keeping her out, which is really tacky for something that happened 30 years ago, or taking her back and risk a race relations fiasco because of the suit.

Then again compare that to the double standard in the media. CBS gets a pass from the 70s and 80s when people talk about its past..

Apparently, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine does as well, especially with Jake Sisko uses the same word when talking about equality. So would this be a double standard within a double standard?

Or is it that we have become too PC to not hurt someone's feelings? or is it bloody well time that we get off our arses and deal with it instead of sweeping it under the rug?

Again, firing someone for what they said 30 years ago is very sad and pathetic.

BL.
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Old Jun 24, 2013, 04:06 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by bradl View Post
Reading a few articles on it, it sounds like it was roughly 30 years ago in a private conversation. But it was in talking to somebody about it in 2007 that prompted this lawsuit. It was the deposition in that lawsuit that caught Food Network's attention. But some questions remain:

Why rehash something that happened 30 years ago?
It goes to character. She also has publicly tried to, in a strange way, non-apology apologize for her actions.

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Why wait 6 years before filing a suit regarding it?
Because usually there is a long wait for the case to trip through the machinations of the system. Some cases take months, and even years, to get their cases figured out, filed, docketed, hearings held, etc...

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Originally Posted by bradl View Post
The statement, as I read it, concerned wedding planning and having a "southern plantation style" wedding, fitting with that time (you can figure out the rest from there). Also, my understanding is that this has to do with racial discrimination. What and where is the relation between her comments and the suit?
It's the whole butt-backwards idea that even in the 1980's that someone would 'hire blacks to pose as slaves' for a wedding, and think it was OK. And using the 'n'-word like it was saying 'the' in a sentence. It shows her racial insensitivity, and her lack of character. Oh, not to mention that it just leaves such a warm fuzzy feeling in people's minds when they think of someone behaving like that.
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If this happened 30 years ago, and Deen has indeed apologized and atoned for her words, why bring it up now to the point that her contract doesn't get renewed? (She didn't get fired; Food Network opted to not renew her contract at the end of this month.)
So why prosecute an old Nazi living in (where was it, Chicago, Minneapolis)? I mean, the Nazi's terrorized Jews, Blacks, Gays, and just about everyone they didn't like, how many years ago? Because it was a heinous act. 'Just following orders' doesn't cut it, and 'gosh, everyone else did it, and I didn't mean anything by it' doesn't cut it either. Well, there were a lot of 'white folk' stringing up blacks just for being black. That didn't make it anywhere close to being right.

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Originally Posted by bradl View Post
So many missing pieces here that some of this makes absolutely no sense. Food Network is obviously being PC about it, but let's face it: Would someone like Sherman Helmsley get treated the same way (sacked from a network) from all the remarks he said on The Jeffersons? What about Carroll O'Connor? Would Archie Bunker be too much for a network to get past, or would everything he did on In the Heat of the Night make up for it?
Both examples were actors playing parts in situation comedies on TeeVee. Deen is a public figure spouting horrible racist attacks on a group of people guilty of one thing they can't change: skin color. Many people pushed that bigotry to the level of denying blacks the right to marry, to assemble in groups, to vote, to walk on streets, to be educated, to shop in stores, to talk, to exist as a human being... I'm disgusted at the level of hostility that white people have shown to not only blacks but the native americans that were here long before whites even arrived.

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Originally Posted by bradl View Post
As for the "y'all" thing.. You should have seen Down Home with the Neely's. They used it just as much as Deen.

Speaking of Deen, this makes you wonder about Bobby Deen's contract, since Food Network owns the Cooking Channel, where Bobby stars in Not my Momma's Meals.
Is he defending his mother? If so, then maybe he needs to be called in and given a sanity check. His mother *might* be able to sneak the 'I'm an old racist white bitch' defense, but her spawn have no right to even think that as a defense. They live in a society that (should have) recognized the heinous and ridiculousness of the racist trash that tormented, tortured, and killed a class of people for the color of their skin. As such, if he is defending his mother, he should go to. Immediately.

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Originally Posted by bradl View Post
Finally, look at where she was born and raised, as well as the time she was raised. Then ask the common sense question: Did you really not expect this? Really? If I got called that by kids in southern Oklahoma in 1983 when I was 9, what makes you think that that isn't going to be in someone's head let alone used during the time she was growing up? Believe it or not, but there is still a lot of pent up anger about everything from Reconstruction to the Civil Rights era down there that hasn't been dealt with. People say that they are over it, but here again, some of it shows its ugly head.
So again, anyone born in pre/post Nazi Germany is automatically excluded from punishment for heating Jews, gays, and black people? I think not...

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Originally Posted by bradl View Post
I digressed; back to Deen. A hell of a lot worse has happened to other people on broadcast TV, and have gotten away with it. To bring up something like this and make a lawsuit out of it is really petty. And again, this brings up the double standard with the N-Word that needs to be addressed in US society.
And politicians too. David Vitter for one. It doesn't make it right... If it was a 'perfect world', everyone would live by the words they use to describe themselves. Then politics AND religion would have nothing to worry about for all the false prophets that flood those two professions.

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Full Disclosure: I'm a Black guy, and have been on the receiving end of that word many a day, and still hear my relatives use it, much to my dismay. Luckily, I've taken the high road and avoided all conversation about it outside of telling them that it's wrong and not to use it in front of my wife or children (wife is White; children are mixed). I can't control my relatives, but I can control what goes into my children's ears and vocabulary, and that word (among others) will never be one of them that slips through.

BL.
My first exposure to racism was in North Carolina. My dad and I were out fishing the swamps and creeks of Fayetteville and happened on a small store out on a single track in the swamps. This was back probably around '67 or
68. They had the single bottle Coke machine that you opened a tall door to and pulled the bottle through. I remember because it was hot and steamy that day and I cooled off by sticking my hands in the machine and rubbing my face... BUT... There was a sign on the edge of the roof that said 'BLACKS ONLY' and pointed down to a filthy drinking fountain that didn't even have a drain hooked to it. The other fountain was inside and very clean. I imagined how much hatred there must be for the black race that even the water that rolled of their faces wasn't somehow worth saving by having a drain tube. THAT sight changed me for ever. I was dumbfounded, and deeply humiliated of the white race after that. It was beyond disgusting... You may accept that, and even forgive it but I find that level of hatred and stupidity beyond forgiveness. Especially when it's exhibited today. For Christ sakes, people really should know better. For Paula Deen, there is no excuse.

I also believe that she is accused of discrimination as recent as a few years ago. It appears to be a 'habit' with her. She really should have known better...
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Old Jun 24, 2013, 04:13 PM   #21
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Wasn't there also something about her wanting to open a restaurant with slaves and servants?
You might be thinking of the part where she was planning a wedding and wanted all the waiters to be black and dressed in pre-civil war clothing.

I had a laugh when I saw on the internet her before and after company photo. She used to have a picture of herself and about two dozen white workers from her company. It was replaced with a picture of her and a dozen workers, now including ONE BLACK DUDE.

pic on this page:
http://www.uproxx.com/tv/2013/06/her...o/#more-270712

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Old Jun 24, 2013, 04:14 PM   #22
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From another website I frequent:

"I need to say something about Paula Deen and this is it.

Screw you, Paula.

Okay, here’s how Paula Deen hurt me personally. All week long I have been hearing commentators on teevee say that using the N word should be expected from “Southern white women of a certain age.” I even heard one say it was “understandable.”

Hell, no. I don’t know where these commentators got that but they need to put it down right now and never touch it again.

I am Paula Deen’s age and I live in the South. I have not used the N word since I was 6 years old (I heard it at school) and my Irish grandma swatted my bottom for saying it. I was told that words like that do not come out of a lady’s mouth and that Jesus loves all the little children — red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in his sight. I was told to say “colored.”

I never said it again. I was 17 years old when Dr. Martin Luther King won the Nobel Peace Prize. So was Paula Deen. So, if she used that word after 1964, shame on her. She knew full well that she should not be saying that.

But now, when people look at me, they think I talk like Paula Deen, but should be forgiven for it based on my age and my birthplace. No.

Paula Deen knew for a damn fact that those words were hurtful and not acceptable. My grandmother, rest her precious soul, would have stomped her and said indignantly, “And she calls herself a lady?”

My friend Laura sent me this to read. You will feel far less sympathy for Deen after reading this.

So, Paula, screw you. Not all Southern women of a certain age are a bunch of classless witches.

That’s what I have to say about Paula Deen."

And in case the link stops working, of people don't want to click the link, here is the article. Her racial problems go deeper than 'skin deep'...

"By Dan Bernstein-
CBSChicago.com Senior Columnist

(CBS) Until yesterday, nothing associated with Paula Deen could ever be considered delicious.

No amount of fat, salt or sugar could properly disguise the lowbrow, redneck garbage she slung from her homespun TV kitchen – either the insulting recipes or the endless, syrupy patter about her rustic Georgia upbringing. A drawling comfort-mama for diabetic simpletons, she greased and gravied herself into a cultural sweet spot.

Now she’s toast. Buttered.

The civil complaint that would ultimately lead to her firing from the Food Network first made news when it was filed in March of 2011. It’s worth a full read again, now, to note the sheer amount of racist, sexist, anti-Semitic and downright inhuman behavior alleged as normal activity within her business operation.

Transcripts of sworn depositions are turning accusations into truths. Despite her pathetic public pleas for forgiveness, nobody’s buying. She tried to fall on her sword, but she broke it.

This comes as no real surprise to those of us long mindful of the unsettling subtext to her show and entire persona. Anything that calculatedly southern, that proudly deep-Southern, carries with it the weight of history, for better or worse. She was Ole Miss football for daytime television, a stars-and-bars-festooned pickup truck idling on the talk-show couch, a cast-iron-baked Lynyrd Skynyrd anthem of cornmeal and molasses.

Hungry for her “Confederate Bean Soup?” How about a “Sambo Burger?”

She hasn’t seen anything wrong whatsoever with labels like that, just as she thought it would be so adorable to dress black people up as slaves for a wedding dinner, because that was just so nice way back when.

And despite headlines and carefully-crafted statements from lawyers and publicists, it’s not really about her admitted use of the n-word. It’s the fact that Paula Deen just flatly, clearly, undeniably views blacks as lesser people, if entirely human at all.

Watch her in this videotaped interview she gave the New York Times in the fall of 2012. Far from some latest victim of political-correctness speech police run amok, she then articulated a defense of slavery amid her wistful fondness for the ways of the antebellum South. She tried to inoculate against any hint of racism by waving around the name of an employee of hers whom she insists is “as black as this board,” referring to the backdrop behind her.

Any apology made on her behalf seems to be an attempt to paint her as a mere product of another place and another age, when it was okay to think and say such things. The point this misses is that it not only is unacceptable now, but there should be nothing but deep shame felt for any environment in which it was allowed, ever.

Besides, it’s not like Deen is 170, having grown up in Albany, Georgia during what she feels is slavery’s glorious heyday. She was born in 1947. She was seven when Brown v. Board of Education was decided, 17 when Martin Luther King won the Nobel Peace Prize, and still just 30 when the miniseries “Roots” won nine Emmys, a Golden Globe, and a Peabody Award.

Until yesterday, she had the system wired to play up all the folksy charm of her heritage while smoothing away any rough edges of its horrific historical dark side. She even accomplished one of the most shockingly brazen endorsement deals in the history of modern media – finally getting around to admitting her own diabetes, only to begin shilling for a drug purported to fight the disease. She was stuffing her drooling viewers’ bodies full of excess glucose, only to grab at their money once they talked to their alarmed doctors.

A charade that never really should have been allowed to happen in the first place is finally over. An uneducated, unattractive woman who can’t cook somehow stumbled up to a prime position in American media by pandering successfully to similarly stupid, unhealthy people, aided by TV executives happy to keep cashing their checks.

Paula Deen’s career deserves this kind of embarrassing final chapter, as it was ugly on all levels: the woman, the food, and all the southern imagery evocative of still-discriminatory places and terrible times.

Out of the frying pan, into the fired."

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Old Jun 24, 2013, 04:17 PM   #23
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Can someone shed some light on the context of this situation? From what I've gathered someone is suing Paula Deen for discrimination. As a part of the lawsuit they are pointing to a deposition in which she admitted to using a racial slur 30 years ago. What was the context of using the racial slur? Was it in private, was it on the air, was it said as a joke, was it said to be intentionally offensive etc. etc..

I ask because I'm not connecting the dots here regarding how all of this fits together. It seems that none of us would stand up to a scrutiny test that spanned the last 30 years. I certainly know I've made choices that weren't the best over the past three decades, many that I wish I could go back and do differently.

As far as people criticizing her food and the diabetes thing. Seriously people, really?!? I do watch cooking shows and Food Network and I've never heard anyone, especially Paula Deen, ever attempt to advertise her food or cooking style as healthy. When she got diabetes how is that anyone else's business? It's her private health information. Being a celebrity or in the public eye doesn't mean your private health information must now be shared with everyone else.

If you don't know that consistently eating sugary, high calorie, high fat, or fried foods (i.e. Southern Cookin') will have a negative impact on your health then you've been living under a rock somewhere. Additionally, if you are getting your health and food information strictly from cooking shows on television then you are definitely in trouble.
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Old Jun 24, 2013, 04:53 PM   #24
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Can someone shed some light on the context of this situation? From what I've gathered someone is suing Paula Deen for discrimination. As a part of the lawsuit they are pointing to a deposition in which she admitted to using a racial slur 30 years ago. What was the context of using the racial slur? Was it in private, was it on the air, was it said as a joke, was it said to be intentionally offensive etc. etc..

I ask because I'm not connecting the dots here regarding how all of this fits together. It seems that none of us would stand up to a scrutiny test that spanned the last 30 years. I certainly know I've made choices that weren't the best over the past three decades, many that I wish I could go back and do differently.

As far as people criticizing her food and the diabetes thing. Seriously people, really?!? I do watch cooking shows and Food Network and I've never heard anyone, especially Paula Deen, ever attempt to advertise her food or cooking style as healthy. When she got diabetes how is that anyone else's business? It's her private health information. Being a celebrity or in the public eye doesn't mean your private health information must now be shared with everyone else.

If you don't know that consistently eating sugary, high calorie, high fat, or fried foods (i.e. Southern Cookin') will have a negative impact on your health then you've been living under a rock somewhere. Additionally, if you are getting your health and food information strictly from cooking shows on television then you are definitely in trouble.
When she was asked if she ever used the n-word, she said "Of course." When asked if she could remember one of those times, she said, when I worked at the bank and one of them held a gun to my head. Little by little, more tidbits came out, like the video just shown on MSNBC when she was being interviewed, she called for an assistant or coworker off camera and said something like: we cant see you, your standing against the backdrop (which was black).
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Old Jun 24, 2013, 04:55 PM   #25
Aspasia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mscriv View Post
Can someone shed some light on the context of this situation? From what I've gathered someone is suing Paula Deen for discrimination. As a part of the lawsuit they are pointing to a deposition in which she admitted to using a racial slur 30 years ago. What was the context of using the racial slur? Was it in private, was it on the air, was it said as a joke, was it said to be intentionally offensive etc. etc..

I ask because I'm not connecting the dots here regarding how all of this fits together. It seems that none of us would stand up to a scrutiny test that spanned the last 30 years. I certainly know I've made choices that weren't the best over the past three decades, many that I wish I could go back and do differently.

As far as people criticizing her food and the diabetes thing. Seriously people, really?!? I do watch cooking shows and Food Network and I've never heard anyone, especially Paula Deen, ever attempt to advertise her food or cooking style as healthy. When she got diabetes how is that anyone else's business? It's her private health information. Being a celebrity or in the public eye doesn't mean your private health information must now be shared with everyone else.

If you don't know that consistently eating sugary, high calorie, high fat, or fried foods (i.e. Southern Cookin') will have a negative impact on your health then you've been living under a rock somewhere. Additionally, if you are getting your health and food information strictly from cooking shows on television then you are definitely in trouble.
What struck me was her response, when asked during her deposition if she had ever used the N word: Yes, of course. I wonder why she added the "of course," rather than something like "regrettably" or some other apologetic term.

As to the privacy of diabetes, true, until you negotiate with a drugmaker (Novo Nordisk) to endorse their diabetes drug - for a large fee, of course.
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