Go Back   MacRumors Forums > Apple Systems and Services > OS X > Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old Sep 5, 2013, 01:18 PM   #1
ThePiratkapten
macrumors newbie
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Home-mail with OS X server, email address?

Hi!

I am new to hosting email servers, which is what I want to do with Mac OS X server. I have some questions first.

What will my email address be?
If I use a DDNS with an address like "somethingichoose.provider.com", will my email address be "myname@somethingichoose.provider.com"?
If I don't use an DDNS provider, will the address then be "myname@ipadress"?

I'm sorry if it sounds incomplete or if I miss something, but I think you understand anyway. I very tired. Thanks on fore hand!
ThePiratkapten is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 5, 2013, 01:29 PM   #2
blueroom
macrumors 603
 
blueroom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Toronto, Canada
If you don't already own the Mac server, you may want to consider a Synology NAS as it can do those things. They even offer their own free (but basic) Dynamic DNS service for their NAS's.
__________________
My iOS devices are not jailbroken.
Bill
My Blog
blueroom is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 5, 2013, 05:23 PM   #3
1911
macrumors member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Home-mail

First, to do email "right," I would suggest you register a domain name. With that in hand, then you can proceed to install OS X server and configure DNS. You will need to configure your router/firewall to allow the necessary ports for incoming and outgoing email. This info can be found in the OS X install document which can be found here:
Server Docs
Another link of well know ports can be found here: Common Port Numbers
You will need to setup a DDNS account for your domain name and hope you do not violate the "Terms of Service" agreement with your ISP. If you have a business account this is a non-issue.
One thing I would suggest is to use Snow Leopard Server, things pretty much went south with Lion Server and Mountain Lion Server. 10.6.8 seems to be the most stable of the OS X servers, but that is only my opinion, I am sure others would argue this point.
On another note, Blueroom has a valid point, a Synology NAS device will do exactly what you want and much more, so much more.

Re:I am new to hosting email servers, which is what I want to do with Mac OS X server. I have some questions first.
What will my email address be?
If I use a DDNS with an address like "somethingichoose.provider.com", will my email address be "myname@somethingichoose.provider.com"?
If I don't use an DDNS provider, will the address then be "myname@ipadress"?
I'm sorry if it sounds incomplete or if I miss something, but I think you understand anyway. I very tired. Thanks on fore hand!
1911 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 17, 2013, 07:45 PM   #4
mire3212
macrumors newbie
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Austin, TX
Since no one on here can seem to provide a simple answer to your question, here you go:

The email address is something you can decide. If you own the domain: somethingichoose.provider.com, then you can simply use provider.com.

If you are using something like DynDNS for hostname services, then you're more than likely going to use somethingichoose.provider.com for your domain name.

An example of the latter would be username@domain.dyndns.info.

An example of a domain you own would be username@mydomain.com.

Hope this helps.

P.S. Mail is one of the most complicated systems to get up and running correctly and efficiently. If you're new to hosting online services I highly recommend using an existing email provider or hosting service to avoid breaking the T&Cs from your ISP and dealing with Spam/Blacklisting. It is doable; it is doable right; you just have to know how to do it.
__________________
-Mire
mire3212 is offline   2 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 24, 2013, 07:12 PM   #5
talmy
macrumors 68040
 
talmy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Oregon
I've been running a Mac server at home for nearly 4 years (the first three with SLS, now with ML + Server). About the only service I don't run is Mail. What is the appeal of running a home mail server?
__________________
27" i7 iMac, 15" MacBook Pro, Mac mini with Mavericks Server, 5 other Macs and an unused Apple TV.
talmy is offline   1 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 26, 2013, 05:54 AM   #6
edjs
macrumors newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by talmy View Post
I've been running a Mac server at home for nearly 4 years (the first three with SLS, now with ML + Server). About the only service I don't run is Mail. What is the appeal of running a home mail server?

- To learn how to setup and administer a mail server.
- You don't want your email sitting on some remote company's servers, subject to their monitoring, analysis, subpoenas or (lack of) security.
- Because you can.

But if you are on a residential connection there may be problems if you want to exchange email with the outside world:
- Your ISP may block outbound connections on port 25.
- Remote mail servers may do a reverse lookup on your IP address and refuse the connection if it appears to be from a residential connection.
- Remote mail servers may do a reverse lookup on your IP, and if that hostname does not match your mail server hostname, refuse the connection.
edjs is offline   2 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 26, 2013, 10:25 AM   #7
talmy
macrumors 68040
 
talmy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Oregon
Quote:
Originally Posted by edjs View Post
- You don't want your email sitting on some remote company's servers, subject to their monitoring, analysis, subpoenas or (lack of) security.
It's pretty well understood that email is not secure. To put it another way, it offers the security of a postcard. I know that I'm not allowed to transmit grades to students via email even both I and the student are using the school's Outlook server. Mail sent between systems is always plaintext as far as I know and easily subject to snooping or man-in-the-middle attacks.
__________________
27" i7 iMac, 15" MacBook Pro, Mac mini with Mavericks Server, 5 other Macs and an unused Apple TV.
talmy is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 27, 2013, 04:22 PM   #8
alexrmc92
macrumors regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by talmy View Post
It's pretty well understood that email is not secure. To put it another way, it offers the security of a postcard. I know that I'm not allowed to transmit grades to students via email even both I and the student are using the school's Outlook server. Mail sent between systems is always plaintext as far as I know and easily subject to snooping or man-in-the-middle attacks.
Yep, although there are encrypted mail protocols available. As fair as i know OS X Server doesn't support any.
alexrmc92 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 28, 2013, 06:05 PM   #9
theluggage
macrumors 65816
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThePiratkapten View Post
What will my email address be?
If I use a DDNS with an address like "somethingichoose.provider.com", will my email address be "myname@somethingichoose.provider.com"?
If I don't use an DDNS provider, will the address then be "myname@ipadress"?
Does your internet provider give you a static IP address, or do you get a new one assigned every time you connect?

If you don't have a static IP then you have not choice but to subscribe to a Dynamic DNS service. I've never used one but I'd guess that they have options for setting up the MX entry (the address of the mail server to which all mail for your domain/subdomain gets sent). Lots of people will just want the DDNS for their website and not want to worry about mail.

If you do have a static IP then you don't need a dynamic DNS server - just buy a domain name from a registry service that runs its own DNS servers and lets you manage your domains online. Then just point the 'MX' entry for your domain to your IP address.

However, there's another way of doing it that usually makes more sense if you're using a domestic internet connection: get an email account with a service provider that lets you have multiple mailboxes, with POP/IMAP access and that provides a relay address for outgoing mail. You can probably get one with a personalised domain.

Then setup fetchmail (Google it) to regularly fetch & delete the contents of your online mailboxes and pass the messages to your local mail server. You then configure the local mail server in "smarthost" mode to send outgoing mail to the service provider's relay.

You still get much of the "running your own mailserver" experience, can use spam assassin etc. to delete spam before it gets to your users, can run a webmail service etc. on your local server. Meanwhile, you won't lose mail if your internet connection or mail server goes down, and there's less scope for inadvertently turning your machine into an open relay for spammers.

One of the major failings in OS X server, IMHO, is that it doesn't come with a click&drool setup wizard for this mode of use.
theluggage is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Sep 29, 2013, 11:02 AM   #10
alain651
macrumors newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Halifax, Canada
I have been running a MacMini server since SL 10.6, Lion 10.7, ML 10.8 for my Home Media Server, share music/video, hosting my personal websites, file sharing, VPN, and email with family.

I recommend www.lynda.com, they have excellent tutorial on setup Apple Server, you need to learn about IP address static /dynamic, DNS, Port Forward, etc..

1. Need to buy a Domain name.
2. Your ISP use Dynamic IP address, so you need a program to update your server to point to the right IP address.

i used - zoneedit.com
- DNSUpdate 2.8
- https://www.macupdate.com/app/mac/6999/dnsupdate
- this program update service from DynDns.org, easydns.com, or zoneEdit.com

3. Check your ISP modern Router IP address. Example they may have 10.0.1.1, 192.168.x.x

4. Change your server network IP address "Using DHCP with Manual address" like 10.0.1.2

5. Set up the Server Apps, using your new domain name.com and your server IP address

6. You need to have access to your ISP admin account and change your PORT FORWARD to have access to the services..

http://support.apple.com/kb/TS1629?v...S&locale=en_US

7. Some ISP, you will need to Relay your outgoing mail throughout their ISP, so have email access...

As all other commends, hosting your own Email service is more trouble and easier to use Gmail or others services... but it always fun to learn and have your own email....

GoodLuck!
alain651 is offline   0 Reply With Quote

Reply
MacRumors Forums > Apple Systems and Services > OS X > Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Similar Threads
thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
how to make Mail show email address (not just name) in the “To” column? LizKat Mac Applications and Mac App Store 3 May 17, 2014 07:34 PM
Why can't you add an email address to your account's address book in the mail app? TH55 iPhone 30 Jan 15, 2014 12:10 PM
Mac Mail 7: Does it work on Mavericks server w/Home folders on server? kk05629 Mac Applications and Mac App Store 2 Dec 10, 2013 03:24 PM
Icloud email with @mac address not connecting to server jasperk99 iOS 6 0 Feb 12, 2013 06:31 PM

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:08 AM.

Mac Rumors | Mac | iPhone | iPhone Game Reviews | iPhone Apps

Mobile Version | Fixed | Fluid | Fluid HD
Copyright 2002-2013, MacRumors.com, LLC