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Old Jan 15, 2014, 10:18 AM   #1
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Chrome for iOS Adds Data Compression and Translation Tools [Updated]




Google today announced an update to its Chrome web browser for iOS, bringing data compression functionality that can reduce data usage by up to 50%.
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To start saving data and turn on an even more secure browsing experience, visit "Settings" > "Bandwidth management" > "Reduce data usage." Then simply turn the toggle to "On." From this menu, you'll also be able to track how much bandwidth you save each month as you browse on Chrome.
The update will also see the addition of a translation bar that automatically offers to translate web pages into the user's language. The translation bar will be familiar to users of the desktop version of Chrome, as a similar feature is already available on that platform.

Google says that the update will be rolling out "over the next few days". Chrome is a free download from the App Store. [Direct Link]

Update January 27: The update is now available.

Article Link: Chrome for iOS Adds Data Compression and Translation Tools [Updated]
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 10:22 AM   #2
Skika
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Data compression option is something i wish for in Safari.
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 10:23 AM   #3
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But is it snappier?
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 10:25 AM   #4
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The words "even more secure browsing experience" are not words I ever expected to hear when referring to anything Google but then again that is what Google PR department is pushing out. In fact, I suspect that this routes every one of your page views through Google's computers for a thorough data mining operation.
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 10:28 AM   #5
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data compression was announced months ago. this update just rolls it out to everyone..
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 10:31 AM   #6
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The words "even more secure browsing experience" are not words I ever expected to hear when referring to anything Google but then again that is what Google PR department is pushing out. In fact, I suspect that this routes every one of your page views through Google's computers for a thorough data mining operation.
What does their data mining have to do with security in a browser?
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 10:33 AM   #7
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The words "even more secure browsing experience" are not words I ever expected to hear when referring to anything Google but then again that is what Google PR department is pushing out. In fact, I suspect that this routes every one of your page views through Google's computers for a thorough data mining operation.
It says so right there in the screenshot. "Chrome is using Google servers to compress pages you visit before downloading them."
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 10:41 AM   #8
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How is this different from regular HTTP Compression?
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 11:04 AM   #9
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The words "even more secure browsing experience" are not words I ever expected to hear when referring to anything Google but then again that is what Google PR department is pushing out. In fact, I suspect that this routes every one of your page views through Google's computers for a thorough data mining operation.

This! Exactly why I refuse to put anything from Google on my phone if I can.
Has anyone seen their share of the money when Google was fined by exploiting Safari?
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 11:05 AM   #10
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How is this different from regular HTTP Compression?
HTTP compression works directly between the client and server, and does not involve routing the client's requests through an intermediary proxy like Google's method. Also, HTTP compression is lossless and transparent, whereas Google transcodes images to WebP.
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 11:06 AM   #11
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HTTP compression works directly between the client and server, and does not involve routing the client's requests through an intermediary proxy like Google's method. Also, HTTP compression is lossless and transparent, whereas Google transcodes images to WebP.
I don't know much about WebP, could you tell me more about the effect it would have on browsing (speed and image quality).
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 11:48 AM   #12
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What does their data mining have to do with security in a browser?
How is it secure if they snoop ALL YOUR DATA before passing it on to you?
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 11:52 AM   #13
Michael Goff
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How is it secure if they snoop ALL YOUR DATA before passing it on to you?
As secure as their servers are, which is actually quite secure.

Or we could run around paranoid...
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 12:31 PM   #14
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As secure as their servers are, which is actually quite secure.

Or we could run around paranoid...
So let me get the straight. You are afraid of the off-chance that someone may be intercepting your non-https web browsing but are ok with passing your non-https data through a company whose business model is data mining? Wow.

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Old Jan 15, 2014, 12:46 PM   #15
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So let me get the straight. You are afraid of off-chance that someone may be intercepting your non-https web browsing but are ok with passing your data through a company whose business model is data mining? Wow.
Probably because those aren't the same things at all.
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 01:28 PM   #16
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I don't know much about WebP, could you tell me more about the effect it would have on browsing (speed and image quality).
WebP is Google's own image format that results in even smaller image files, thereby speeding up the transfer and display of those images. That's not a concern, but what is a concern is that Google is acting as a proxy for *all* of your web traffic. That's scary because they have a responsibility to be running a profitable business, so why would they be giving away this high-tech service for free? There must be something they are gaining from it, and I suspect that data mining, even just knowing which websites your visiting, is giving them ammunition for more effective targeted advertising.
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 01:31 PM   #17
Michael Goff
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So let me get the straight. You are afraid of the off-chance that someone may be intercepting your non-https web browsing but are ok with passing your non-https data through a company whose business model is data mining? Wow.
For one, I'm not.

For two, I trust Google more than random strangers.

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WebP is Google's own image format that results in even smaller image files, thereby speeding up the transfer and display of those images. That's not a concern, but what is a concern is that Google is acting as a proxy for *all* of your web traffic. That's scary because they have a responsibility to be running a profitable business, so why would they be giving away this high-tech service for free? There must be something they are gaining from it, and I suspect that data mining, even just knowing which websites your visiting, is giving them ammunition for more effective targeted advertising.
They're gaining our data, yes.

To be honest, that isn't the problem I have with Google these days. They can have my data, the worst that happens is that I get targeted ads.

Oh, also, WebP sounds amazing.
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 01:50 PM   #18
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I don't know much about WebP, could you tell me more about the effect it would have on browsing (speed and image quality).
Google claims that WebP compression results in about 25% smaller file sizes compared to existing schemes like JPEG and PNG, so speed should be somewhat better on graphics-heavy web pages.

When using WebP in lossy mode, the transcoding results in a loss of image quality. It depends on the settings how significant this is. Considering the small screen size on a phone, it's probably not very relevant if you are just viewing the images. However, perhaps a bigger concern is that you lose access to the original source image. Sometimes I store images I find on the web for later use or email forwarding, and for that I'd rather have the original JPEG or PNG.
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 03:52 PM   #19
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How is it secure if they snoop ALL YOUR DATA before passing it on to you?
So lemme get this right. You are worried they could snoop your data before passing it on to you. Question: If you're using Chrome wouldn't Google already have the data you're so worried about? Following the "Evil Google" theme, if you're on Chrome they are going to use this to re-mine the data they already have? Got it.

Look healthy skepticism is a good thing. Paranoia is something else altogether. If you don't use Chrome you can sleep safer at night.
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 06:30 PM   #20
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Google is trying to outdo the NSA on privacy invasion. The NSA put back doors into Linux that have never been code reviewed - I bet Google did the same with WebKit. Apple probably kept removing them, thus prompting Google to branch away.

Also, don't kid yourself about the security of Google's servers. Nothing is impenetrable/unhackable. Even if Google has the most secure servers in the world, your best bet for retaining your privacy is to not trust all your data with a single company. Just like you shouldn't use the same password everywhere (if a single company leaks it, they may as well all have) - you shouldn't trust a single company with your everything. If Google leaks, everything you've ever done on the web is out.

Personally, I'd rather simply not be tracked, thus my switching to DuckDuckGo. Not only do they not track me, I actually rather like their "bangs" (shortcuts.)
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 06:37 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by ArtOfWarfare View Post
Google is trying to outdo the NSA on privacy invasion. The NSA put back doors into Linux that have never been code reviewed - I bet Google did the same with WebKit. Apple probably kept removing them, thus prompting Google to branch away.

Also, don't kid yourself about the security of Google's servers. Nothing is impenetrable/unhackable. Even if Google has the most secure servers in the world, your best bet for retaining your privacy is to not trust all your data with a single company. Just like you shouldn't use the same password everywhere (if a single company leaks it, they may as well all have) - you shouldn't trust a single company with your everything. If Google leaks, everything you've ever done on the web is out.

Personally, I'd rather simply not be tracked, thus my switching to DuckDuckGo. Not only do they not track me, I actually rather like their "bangs" (shortcuts.)
And thus they made Blink, an Open Source project. Must be a bunch of people just twiddling their thumbs. I'm told that Open Source prevents these backdoors. Or are people, the community that is looking over the code and so forth, just being nice to Google and giving them a pass?

Edit: And for the record, no computer is immune from hacking, but Google's servers are quite secure. The only time I can remember them being hacked was using a flaw found in IE 6. So, really, stop neigh paranoid.
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 06:39 PM   #22
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But is it snappier?
snappier? are you from the 90s?
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 06:41 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by ArtOfWarfare View Post
Google is trying to outdo the NSA on privacy invasion. The NSA put back doors into Linux that have never been code reviewed - I bet Google did the same with WebKit. Apple probably kept removing them, thus prompting Google to branch away.

Also, don't kid yourself about the security of Google's servers. Nothing is impenetrable/unhackable. Even if Google has the most secure servers in the world, your best bet for retaining your privacy is to not trust all your data with a single company. Just like you shouldn't use the same password everywhere (if a single company leaks it, they may as well all have) - you shouldn't trust a single company with your everything. If Google leaks, everything you've ever done on the web is out.

Personally, I'd rather simply not be tracked, thus my switching to DuckDuckGo. Not only do they not track me, I actually rather like their "bangs" (shortcuts.)
And similarly DuckDuckGo is a conspiracy to get more people to go to them so that they can gather more data (and become more popular).
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 06:43 PM   #24
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To be honest, that isn't the problem I have with Google these days. They can have my data, the worst that happens is that I get targeted ads.
Yeah, the worst part about Google these days is getting bugged to sign into Google + every time you want to watch a video on YouTube. Iíll take heavily targeted ads over that any day.
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Old Jan 15, 2014, 06:49 PM   #25
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Yeah, the worst part about Google these days is getting bugged to sign into Google + every time you want to watch a video on YouTube. Iíll take heavily targeted ads over that any day.
That's not so bad.
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