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Old Aug 26, 2014, 05:55 PM   #1
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Seagate Announces First 8 TB Hard Drive for Enterprise Customers




Seagate today announced the world's first eight terabyte hard drive, designed to provide high capacity storage for private and cloud-based data centers. The single 3.5-inch hard disk drive surpasses the storage capacity of previously available hard drives, including 6 TB HDDs from both Western Digital and Seagate itself.

Unlike similar high-capacity offerings from Western Digital, Seagate does not use helium in either its 6 TB HDD or its new 8 TB offering. While Seagate has not released the details behind the 8 TB drive, it's likely the HDD uses Seagate's shingled magnetic recording technology, which, according to the company, adds more than 25 percent capacity growth by maximizing the number of tracks per inch on a single disk.

Seagate says that its new 8 TB HDD also uses fewer components to make it more power efficient, which ultimately lowers power costs for enterprise customers.
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A cornerstone for growing capacities in multiple applications, the 8TB hard drive delivers bulk data storage solutions for online content storage providing customers with the highest capacity density needed to address an ever increasing amount of unstructured data in an industry-standard 3.5-inch HDD. Providing up to 8TB in a single drive slot, the drive delivers maximum rack density, within an existing footprint, for the most efficient data center floor space usage possible.

The 8TB hard disk drive increases system capacity using fewer components for increased system and staffing efficiencies while lowering power costs. With its low operating power consumption, the drive reliably conserves energy thereby reducing overall operating costs. Helping customers economically store data, it boasts the best Watts/GB for enterprise bulk data storage in the industry.
Seagate is currently shipping the drives to select numbers with wide scale availability coming next quarter. The company did not release pricing on the drives.

Article Link: Seagate Announces First 8 TB Hard Drive for Enterprise Customers
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 06:10 PM   #2
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But... It's Seagate.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 06:12 PM   #3
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I'll get my 8TB HD when they're $20 on amazon in 5 years.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 06:13 PM   #4
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I'll get my 8TB HD when they're $20 on amazon in 5 years.
Delivered by a drone too!
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 06:14 PM   #5
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The Backblaze study really hurt poor Seagate's reputation. People forget that the drives they used (and studied) were the highest capacity-to-price ratio drives that the manufacturers offered.

It certainly made me think twice about replacing my faulty stock MBP Seagate with another Seagate. I didn't. But I really hope that Seagate can build its reputation back up. It's clearly a great innovator in the HD industry.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 06:14 PM   #6
Bensalama21
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Delivered by a drone too!
And the drone comes free with the hard drive.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 06:14 PM   #7
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Back in my day... we were downloading Mandrake Linux in 5-7 days on Dial-up!
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 06:21 PM   #8
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Seagate Announces First 8 TB Hard Drive for Enterprise Customers

It's kind of crazy when you think about it. When I first got my computer back in 1995, it had Windows 95 on it, and had a 4GB hard drive. The salesman at Sears told me "4GB is all you will EVER need!"



Now, we're at 8TB hard drives. I know they aren't producing them for consumers yet, but still. Wow.

Last edited by markyr17; Aug 26, 2014 at 07:28 PM. Reason: mistake
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 06:26 PM   #9
Applefan 2013
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8TB‽ I thought that 6TB drives just recently came out (although I don't really follow hard drive news)!
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 06:35 PM   #10
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This is cool, no doubt, but as far as storage-density-that-scares-the-willies-out-of-me-in-a-sort-of-existential-way goes, the 128 gig micro sd cards still win.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 06:49 PM   #11
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Finally. I can now store my entire porn library with fewer than 10 drives.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 07:19 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by markyr17 View Post
It's kind of crazy when you think about it. When I first got my computer back in 1995, it had Windows 95 on it, and had a 4GB hard drive. The salesman at Sears told me "4GB is all you will EVER need!"

Now, we're at 8GB hard drives. I know they aren't producing them for consumers yet, but still. Wow.
What was really amusing was when I had a Mac LC II. It had an 80MB hard drive, and I later purchased a ZIP drive to accompany it. So, I had a 80MB hard drive, and 100MB floppies.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 07:30 PM   #13
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Each one of these drives can hold all the data that Facebook stores on 33K of it's typical users. So they'll need 45 thousand of these hard drives right now, for their 1.5B users.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 07:32 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by markyr17 View Post
It's kind of crazy when you think about it. When I first got my computer back in 1995, it had Windows 95 on it, and had a 4GB hard drive. The salesman at Sears told me "4GB is all you will EVER need!"
If he was good at predicting the future he probably wouldn't have been working at Sears.

----------

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Finally. I can now store my entire porn library with fewer than 10 drives.
Sure... but who wants to convert it to standard def?
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 07:40 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by AnsonX10 View Post
The Backblaze study really hurt poor Seagate's reputation. People forget that the drives they used (and studied) were the highest capacity-to-price ratio drives that the manufacturers offered.

It certainly made me think twice about replacing my faulty stock MBP Seagate with another Seagate. I didn't. But I really hope that Seagate can build its reputation back up. It's clearly a great innovator in the HD industry.
Backblaze used Seagate consumer grade external backup drives for their data centers and pulled them out of the external case. These drives are not designed for data center applications. They used enterprise grade drives from hitachi and WD. It was a really unfair study. All the Seagate drives where also over a year out of their documented life span of 6 years.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 07:50 PM   #16
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Apple ][ with tape, then with a Disk ][. Then a 5MB Trustor hard disk. (not to mention the TRS-80s with tape at school).

"8TB should be enough for anyone" - says the guy working at Sears in August 2014. lol

The correct answer is, that you need just about twice as much storage as the largest current drive available.



Quote:
Originally Posted by markyr17 View Post
It's kind of crazy when you think about it. When I first got my computer back in 1995, it had Windows 95 on it, and had a 4GB hard drive. The salesman at Sears told me "4GB is all you will EVER need!"



Now, we're at 8TB hard drives. I know they aren't producing them for consumers yet, but still. Wow.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 08:07 PM   #17
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Dazzling. I recall scraping up about $700 to buy a 64MB SCSI drive for an Amiga and thinking at the time that I would never fill it up. It's just amazing that one could store so much in such a little space and that 4-bay boxes could soon hold 32TB of storage. Wow!
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 08:19 PM   #18
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Now the NAS manufacturers need to remove the artificial volume size limit they place on arrays. Currently, you can't have a single volume larger than 16TB on any of the name brand NAS's (Synology, QNAP, Drobo, etc.), even though any modern OS supports volumes in the exabyte range.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 08:21 PM   #19
HobeSoundDarryl
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Ummmm I have a Synology NAS with a single 28TB volume right now… and have for about a year+.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 08:42 PM   #20
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No thanks:

http://www.pcworld.com/article/20894...ve-makers.html
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 08:51 PM   #21
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Ummmm I have a Synology NAS with a single 28TB volume right now… and have for about a year+.
Really? Every Synology NAS I've looked at—including their newest DS415play—lists 16TB as the max volume size in the technical documentation. If this isn't the case, then I'll have to take another look at them.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 09:03 PM   #22
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Really? Every Synology NAS I've looked at—including their newest DS415play—lists 16TB as the max volume size in the technical documentation. If this isn't the case, then I'll have to take another look at them.
Not sure where you're getting that. Just randomly poking around some of the higher end models shows 108TB limit. Not sure even that number is accurate on the highest end models (e.g. the ds3612xs - I have two of those, both with volumes bigger than 16TB).
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 09:07 PM   #23
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The correct answer is, that you need just about twice as much storage as the largest current drive available.
That's pretty close to right. For me it's twice as much as the last generation disk.

My pattern has been that when my working drive fills up, I buy two of the latest gen drives and make them my Time Machine drive. I then take the Time Machine pair and promote it to be my new working drive. It's worked about right for a few generations now.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 09:16 PM   #24
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If he was good at predicting the future he probably wouldn't have been working at Sears.
No; but he might have been working at "Seer's" instead.
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Old Aug 26, 2014, 09:20 PM   #25
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Really? Every Synology NAS I've looked at—including their newest DS415play—lists 16TB as the max volume size in the technical documentation. If this isn't the case, then I'll have to take another look at them.
Yes, if you go to a site like Amazon, search for 8 or 12-bay (or more) RAID, then sort by price high to low, you can find pre-populated RAIDs at 72GB (12 times 6TB), maybe more. They should show up as one big volume.
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