Register FAQ / Rules Forum Spy Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Go Back   MacRumors Forums > Apple Systems and Services > OS X

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old Feb 27, 2008, 12:54 PM   #1
fab5freddy
macrumors 65816
 
fab5freddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Heaven or Hell
Mac OS X Extended Journaled or Not ?

Hi there, i have been told by a mac expert that
when formating a Drive for Mac, and you don't need
Journaled, you get a faster drive, when you format a drive
without being Journaled ??

Is This True ?

by the way, what does Journaled Do ? Vs. Not Journaled....?
fab5freddy is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Feb 27, 2008, 12:58 PM   #2
TEG
macrumors 604
 
TEG's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Langley, Washington
Send a message via ICQ to TEG Send a message via AIM to TEG Send a message via MSN to TEG Send a message via Yahoo to TEG Send a message via Skype™ to TEG
Journaling is the active defrag that Apple does to increase speed (and prevent data corruption). The most often accessed files are moved to the fastest parts of the drive on the fly.

TEG
__________________
Apple and Dell are the only ones in this industry making money. They make it by being Wal-Mart. We make it by innovation, - Steve Jobs
The Tegian Zone-Glass Onion Radio
TEG is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Feb 27, 2008, 12:59 PM   #3
mrwizardno2
macrumors 6502a
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEG View Post
Journaling is the active defrag that Apple does to increase speed (and prevent data corruption). The most often accessed files are moved to the fastest parts of the drive on the fly.

TEG
Not quite.

Check out Apple's Documentation http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107249

Journaling actually can slow down a disk, as the OP was correctly told. Because each transaction must be recorded to the journal, there is a performance penalty when writing to the disk. Reading from the disk carries no such penalty.

Try a quick google search using "disk journaling" and "disk journaling performance". You'll find a few useful articles.
__________________
2.4GHz SR MacBook Pro / Matte / 4 GB ram
mrwizardno2 is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Feb 27, 2008, 01:01 PM   #4
saltyzoo
macrumors 65816
 
saltyzoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEG View Post
Journaling is the active defrag that Apple does to increase speed (and prevent data corruption). The most often accessed files are moved to the fastest parts of the drive on the fly.

TEG
Not so much.

Journaling is used to prevent data corruption in case of sudden power outage, etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Journaling_file_system
saltyzoo is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Feb 27, 2008, 01:04 PM   #5
gr8tfly
macrumors 603
 
gr8tfly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: ~119W 34N
The benefits outweigh any performance hits. Very few instances would see any difference.

Here's a KB article from Apple: http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107249
__________________
Macs from 1984 to 15" Retina MBP 768GB SSD 16GB RAM, from Newton to iPhone 5 S⃣ , iPods, and tv (3). 128GB Wifi iPad Air
gr8tfly is offline   0 Reply With Quote
Old Feb 27, 2008, 01:25 PM   #6
Amdahl
macrumors 65816
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Quote:
Originally Posted by TEG View Post
Journaling is the active defrag that Apple does to increase speed (and prevent data corruption). The most often accessed files are moved to the fastest parts of the drive on the fly.

TEG
That isn't journaling. That is the auto-defrag & the hot file feature.

Journaling can slow down or speed up disk writes depending on the particulars. Unless you know exactly why you want it off, it is better to be left on.

Manually defragging your Safari cache is often a big speed win on 10.5. In Terminal, with Safari closed, run the following lines. If you have other user accounts, log out and back in as each account and repeat:

PLEASE NOTE :::: THE SINGLE QUOTES on THECACHE line are from the quote on the tilde(~) key to the left of the number 1 key. You must use the correct quote! The double quotes around Cache.db are the usual double quote from pressing Shift with the key to the immediate left of your Return/Enter key. Or, just cut & paste!

cd ~/Library/Caches/com.apple.Safari
dd if=Cache.db of=Cache.db2 bs=16384k
chown `ls -l Cache.db| cut -f4 -d' '` Cache.db2
mv Cache.db2 Cache.db
sqlite3 Cache.db VACUUM
cd /private/var/folders
THESAFE=`find . -iname "SafeBrowsing.db" | grep Safari|head -n1`
dd if=$THESAFE of=~/SafeBrowsing.db2 bs=16384k
chown `ls -l $THESAFE| cut -f4 -d' '` ~/SafeBrowsing.db2
mv ~/SafeBrowsing.db2 $THESAFE
sqlite3 $THESAFE VACUUM

You'll get some permission denied from find. Don't mind them.
ONLY FOR 10.5! Safari on 10.4 has a different cache structure.

Last edited by Amdahl; May 13, 2009 at 11:42 PM.
Amdahl is offline   0 Reply With Quote

Reply
MacRumors Forums > Apple Systems and Services > OS X

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Similar Threads
thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Inquiry regarding Mac OS Extended (Journaled, Encrypted) MacBookWhooo Mac Basics and Help 5 Apr 19, 2014 11:09 AM
Can't move big files even to Mac OS Extended Journaled drives! loudfeline OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion 4 Jul 17, 2013 07:20 AM
Time Capsule/Time Machine OS Extended (journaled) error tburk32 Mac Peripherals 2 Mar 12, 2013 09:56 PM
Is Mac OS extended (journaled) necessary? 2012Tony2012 iMac 20 Dec 3, 2012 09:46 AM
Formating Time Capsule to Mac OS Extended Journaled? Daemon.CRO Mac Basics and Help 0 Oct 21, 2012 12:57 PM

Forum Jump

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:21 AM.

Mac Rumors | Mac | iPhone | iPhone Game Reviews | iPhone Apps

Mobile Version | Fixed | Fluid | Fluid HD
Copyright 2002-2013, MacRumors.com, LLC