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Old May 3, 2010, 11:51 PM   #51
sammmu
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Good tips man.

How do I get to know if my Mc is 32 or 64?
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Old May 4, 2010, 02:39 AM   #52
msjones
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Originally Posted by sammmu View Post
Good tips man.

How do I get to know if my Mc is 32 or 64?
Run this command in terminal

Code:
oreg -l -p IODeviceTree | grep firmware-abi
It will return either EFI32 or EFI64.
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Old Jun 15, 2010, 02:06 PM   #53
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I want to install windows 7 on a vm (already have virtual box downloaded). From what I understand I should run the 64 bit version since I have a late 09, mb pro 13 with intel core duo (2.53ghz), and snow leapord 10.06..... Right? Not doing any gaming just need to run a trading program (metatrader) and maybe few other things like normal office suite etc
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Old Jun 15, 2010, 02:09 PM   #54
belvdr
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You can run either. For what you're doing, 32-bit should be fine.
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Old Jun 19, 2010, 09:02 AM   #55
elcee
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This FAQ is erroneous.

You can run 32 bit apps running the 64 bit kernel just fine. There are several other things wrong with this FAQ.
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Old Jun 20, 2010, 10:42 AM   #56
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What I've found out and what it means to us

64 bit is basically a way of saying faster, stronger computer to use more memory. It use to be we could only use up to 3 MB but now memory is getting more and more. So faster stronger computers to do your work.

I'm having issues with the cross over.

Older programs such as Maya Autodesk 8.5 do not work on mac. Than we use Rossetta which is suppose to help. But only if the company creates a patch to allow it. (Autodesk will not create a patch. Also, i see that they are excluding mac out of updates.) Of course, autodesk is just one programs. Painter is also having issues. IF they have made a patch. The website makes it impossible to find.

I've read that you can right click on the application and choose 32 bit or 64 bit. That the computer will adjust to it. ( I still haven't figured out how to do this. ANy suggestions on how to get it to work.)

I've also heard if you don't have rossetta installed you can get it from you DVD start up disk. That is if you install it correctly.

If you do have older programs that run on 32 bit than you may half to re purchase them. Such as Maya and painter. Though, there are rumors that they still have issues or don't run at all.

Most of the applications are transitioning nicely such as Adobe products.

If you are a student and are using programs that require 32 bit. Than don't purchase a new mac. You'll have issues with it. It's best to stay with something that works. Instead of halving to re-purchase everything again. Unless, you have lots of money.

IF rossetta is on the web to download. Than I also haven't been able to find it.

I'm struggling to figure out how to fix maya and painter and I wish I knew about this 64 business to save myself a headache.

Any advise on how to fix these things I would greatly appreciate.
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Old Jun 20, 2010, 10:45 AM   #57
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64 bit Information-by mac

64-bit computing used to be the province of scientists and engineers, but now this generational shift in computing gives all users the tools to apply the power of 64-bit to speed up everything from everyday applications to the most demanding scientific computations. Although Mac OS X is already 64-bit capable in many ways, Snow Leopard takes the next big step by rewriting nearly all system applications in 64-bit code¹ and by enabling the Mac to address massive amounts of memory. Now Mac OS X is faster, more secure, and completely ready for the future.

The 64-bit transition.

The entire computing industry is moving from 32-bit to 64-bit technology, and it’s easy to see why. Today’s Mac computers can hold up to 32GB of physical memory, but the 32-bit applications that run on them can address only 4GB of RAM at a time. 64-bit computing shatters that barrier by enabling applications to address a theoretical 16 billion gigabytes of memory, or 16 exabytes. It can also enable computers to crunch twice the data per clock cycle, which can dramatically speed up numeric calculations and other tasks. Earlier versions of Mac OS X have offered a range of 64-bit capabilities. Now Snow Leopard takes the next step in the transition from 32-bit to 64-bit.

Built-in applications are now 64-bit.

Nearly all system applications — including the Finder, Mail, Safari, iCal, and iChat — are now built with 64-bit code. So not only are they able to take full advantage of all the memory in your Mac, but the move to 64-bit applications also boosts overall performance. Together with other refinements and improvements in Snow Leopard, this means that just about everything you do — from launching applications like QuickTime to running JavaScript in Safari to opening image files — will feel faster and more responsive.

Ready for the future.

The 64-bit support in Snow Leopard makes Mac OS X completely ready for whatever computing enhancements might arrive in the future. For example, Snow Leopard is ready to support up to 16 terabytes of RAM — about 500 times more than today’s Mac computers can accommodate. That may sound like more RAM than you’ll ever need, but who can predict the requirements of high-performance computers in the future? Mac OS X Snow Leopard comes prepared for anything.
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Old Jun 20, 2010, 11:18 AM   #58
gnasher729
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Quote:
Originally Posted by julial View Post
64 bit is basically a way of saying faster, stronger computer to use more memory. It use to be we could only use up to 3 MB but now memory is getting more and more. So faster stronger computers to do your work.

I'm having issues with the cross over.

Older programs such as Maya Autodesk 8.5 do not work on mac. Than we use Rossetta which is suppose to help. But only if the company creates a patch to allow it. (Autodesk will not create a patch. Also, i see that they are excluding mac out of updates.) Of course, autodesk is just one programs. Painter is also having issues. IF they have made a patch. The website makes it impossible to find.

I've read that you can right click on the application and choose 32 bit or 64 bit. That the computer will adjust to it. ( I still haven't figured out how to do this. ANy suggestions on how to get it to work.)

I've also heard if you don't have rossetta installed you can get it from you DVD start up disk. That is if you install it correctly.

If you do have older programs that run on 32 bit than you may half to re purchase them. Such as Maya and painter. Though, there are rumors that they still have issues or don't run at all.

Most of the applications are transitioning nicely such as Adobe products.

If you are a student and are using programs that require 32 bit. Than don't purchase a new mac. You'll have issues with it. It's best to stay with something that works. Instead of halving to re-purchase everything again. Unless, you have lots of money.

IF rossetta is on the web to download. Than I also haven't been able to find it.

I'm struggling to figure out how to fix maya and painter and I wish I knew about this 64 business to save myself a headache.

Any advise on how to fix these things I would greatly appreciate.
I think you are confused between PowerPC vs. Intel and 32 bit vs. 64 bit.

Rosetta has nothing to do with 32 or 64 bit; Rosetta is there to run PowerPC applications on a Macintosh with an Intel processor. That would be applications likely written up to 2006. It has nothing at all to do with 32 or 64 bit. Rosetta will be downloaded automatically when you try to run a PowerPC application on a Macintosh with Intel processor if Rosetta is not yet installed.

32 bit applications for Intel processors work fine on a Macintosh with either a 32 or 64 bit processor. 64 bit applications for Intel processors require a 64 bit processor, which is any Macintosh built from 2007 onwards.
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Old Oct 1, 2010, 04:34 AM   #59
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Great thread, and answered a lot of questions I had before upgrading my Mac/OS. Thanks.
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Old Nov 10, 2010, 01:19 PM   #60
chris650
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i have 8gb memory on my brand new iMac27.

my bootcamp has windows 7 64bit installed. Also, use vmware to point to bootcamp. Does that mean i need osx to be in 64bit too,when i use vmware?
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Old Nov 10, 2010, 01:22 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by chris650 View Post
i have 8gb memory on my brand new iMac27.

my bootcamp has windows 7 64bit installed. Also, use vmware to point to bootcamp. Does that mean i need osx to be in 64bit too,when i use vmware?
Mac OS X 10.6 is already in 64-bit, just the kernel is booting in 32-bit, but you don't need to boot the kernel in 64-bit if you want to do what you want to do.
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Old Nov 10, 2010, 01:56 PM   #62
chris650
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Originally Posted by spinnerlys View Post
Mac OS X 10.6 is already in 64-bit, just the kernel is booting in 32-bit, but you don't need to boot the kernel in 64-bit if you want to do what you want to do.
but vmware is supporting a guest OS in 64bits.
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Old Nov 10, 2010, 02:06 PM   #63
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but vmware is supporting a guest OS in 64bits.
WHat does that have to do with the 32-bit Mac OS X 10.6 kernel? Snow Leopard is capable, according to this FAQ and other sources, to run 64-bit applications even when using the 32-bit kernel. I do it right now. And as VMWare Fusion seems to be in 64-bit, it can run 64-bit OSs. The Mac OS X kernel is not involved in this.

Or where you getting at something else I wrote? I'm not sure, as you haven't been that specific in your reply while quoting me.
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Old Jan 1, 2011, 05:41 AM   #64
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Thanks for the guide! Very useful.
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 01:42 AM   #65
gatortpk
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64-bit does boost performance when pushing it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by lukin View Post
Thanks for the info.

So booting 32 bit kernel still runs 64 bit apps.
Booting 64 bit kernel still runs 32 bit apps.

What's the benefit of booting into the 64 bit kernel, then? After reading this I now understand why people were talking about booting into 64, but also after reading this, all apps run in each mode so... what's the deal about wanting to boot into a 64 bit kernel?

Thanks
Well, not much really except there is an performance increase and it's real for those pushing 100% on all cores. About 10%-20%! I almost couldn't believe it either till I ran GeekBench for 32-bit and 64-bit kernels. Here are two screen shots of the Geekbench scores below. The first 32-bit test was just after a restart, the second test was after 100 CPU Hours and all Apps quit then also. I was shocked, my 2009 iMac broke 10,000! Only MacPros (and the newer iMac can do that.)
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 02:21 AM   #66
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Originally Posted by gatortpk View Post
Well, not much really except there is an performance increase and it's real for those pushing 100% on all cores. About 10%-20%! I almost couldn't believe it either till I ran GeekBench for 32-bit and 64-bit kernels. Here are two screen shots of the Geekbench scores below. The first 32-bit test was just after a restart, the second test was after 100 CPU Hours and all Apps quit then also. I was shocked, my 2009 iMac broke 10,000! Only MacPros (and the newer iMac can do that.)
Not again...

You are comparing a 32 bit application and a 64 bit application. That's what some people don't seem to understand; it is MacOS X and not Windows. You can run 32 bit and 64 bit applications on a 32 bit kernel, and you can run 32 and 64 bit applications on a 64 bit kernel. You have been comparing the applications, not the kernels.

Try running the 64 bit version of Geekbench on a 32 bit kernel, and the 32 bit version on a 64 bit kernel.
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Old Jan 21, 2011, 02:34 AM   #67
gatortpk
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Thanks, you're right!

Quote:
Originally Posted by gnasher729 View Post
Not again...

You are comparing a 32 bit application and a 64 bit application. That's what some people don't seem to understand; it is MacOS X and not Windows. You can run 32 bit and 64 bit applications on a 32 bit kernel, and you can run 32 and 64 bit applications on a 64 bit kernel. You have been comparing the applications, not the kernels.

Try running the 64 bit version of Geekbench on a 32 bit kernel, and the 32 bit version on a 64 bit kernel.
Thanks for the quick response, it took me about 25 seconds to understand what you were talking about, I know you can run 32-bit apps on 64-bit kernel and 64-bit apps on 32-bit kernels, that's awesome about Mac OS X. (Just some annoying kexts that aren't 64-bit yet)

I did your suggestion and while before I had a 16.6% improvement with 64-bit Geekbench, this time I had a 16.0% improvement with 64-bit Geekbench over 32-bit Geekbench, both tested back to back under the 64-bit kernel.

You are right. It's the App that runs faster. Thanks for the info. (I don't understand the Windows comment though, other than in Windows everything has to be either 32-bit or 64-bit, pathetic)
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Old Feb 22, 2011, 09:24 AM   #68
Jeriff
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64 bit requires more advanced hardware equipement than 32 bit,and many apps have only 32 bit version. So, I will not consider 64 bit now.Maybe later...
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Old Mar 8, 2011, 07:29 PM   #69
Modernape
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I did your suggestion and while before I had a 16.6% improvement with 64-bit Geekbench, this time I had a 16.0% improvement with 64-bit Geekbench over 32-bit Geekbench, both tested back to back under the 64-bit kernel.

You are right. It's the App that runs faster.
Yes, the 64-bit App runs 0.6% faster than the 32-bit App, but the 64-bit kernel runs 16% faster than the 32-bit one.

Check the difference on your own machine if you don't believe it - here's the Primatelabs Geekbench scores in 32-bit kernel and 64-bit kernel for most recent Macs.
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Old Mar 9, 2011, 06:34 PM   #70
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I've had issues for months now having to do with bootup(would need to boot 2, 3 or even 4 times before it would actual boot fully and usably) and sleep(would not wake from sleep induced by closing the lid, ever). I have been actively trying to figure this out and no one has ever had a solution for me. The issues started right around the time I installed 8GB RAM as well as an OWC Data Doubler. Looking back on it, I shouldn't have done both those upgrades at the same time, because I did not know which was to blame. I just came upon something saying that booting into 64-bit kernel might solve my problem even though SL 32-bit should be able to handle 8GB without issue. Well, it looks like this was my solution. I did it the first time by just pressing 6 and 4 at boot and it booted up the first time, no hiccups. After that I changed the default from 32-bit boot to 64-bit and after a restart, it again booted fine. This has not happened once since the issues started so i don't think its a fluke thing. I also closed the lid and let it sit for a few minutes, and when i re-opened it it woke up just fine. This looks like the end of my issues, I certainly hope it is at least. Hope this helps anyone else who might be experiencing the same issues.
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Old Mar 9, 2011, 07:40 PM   #71
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Looks like the sleep issue is not resolved...back to the drawing board
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Old Mar 29, 2011, 04:31 AM   #72
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Leopard 10.5.2 and SDK/Xcode

I have installed successfully Leopard 10.5.2 on my PC. I have tried to install Snow Leopard 10.6.3. It is installed successfully but hung during the loading process. So I can use only 10.5.2 version.
Which SDK and Xcode version I should install to the Leopard 10.5.2?

Please help me resolve this issue.

Thanks,
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Old Mar 29, 2011, 04:47 AM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hrach View Post
I have installed successfully Leopard 10.5.2 on my PC. I have tried to install Snow Leopard 10.6.3. It is installed successfully but hung during the loading process. So I can use only 10.5.2 version.
Which SDK and Xcode version I should install to the Leopard 10.5.2?
Your post has nothing to do with this thread.
And you cannot legally install Snow Leopard or Leopard on a PC, so why would anyone help you doing it?
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Old Jun 17, 2011, 09:24 AM   #74
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I just bought MBP, is this already running in 64 or I should manually turn it on somewhere?
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Old Jun 19, 2011, 09:56 AM   #75
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Open System Profiler (press option + the Apple symbol), then select from the left 'Software', you should see '64-bit Kernel and Extensions: Yes'
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