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Old Oct 5, 2004, 01:32 PM   #1
ThatGirl
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VHS to DVD converters

I am hoping someone can give me a little guidance about this subject. I am using an iMac G4, on Jaguar. I have been looking at several models of VHS to DVD converters and would like to know if anyone knows the difference between them.

The cheapest I found was the DataVideo DAC-100(DAC100). When I decided to order it, the operator at the online store told me that people are not usually happy with those and end up returning them, to buy the Canopus brand.

I looked up the Canopus models. There is one just slightly more expensive that the Datavideo. Then there are three other models. The prices range from about $200 to about $450. I tried reading the details to understand the difference, but I just don't know enough about the process itself, to know how to judge the advantages of the highest priced model over the lower priced ones.

Also, do I need to buy a peripheral harddrive to store the data while it is being processed?

I would greatly appreciate any insight anyone has to share about this.

Thank you.
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Old Oct 5, 2004, 02:35 PM   #2
elskeptico
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I'm assuming you're talking about a video capture device that captures from a VHS source and automatically converts to MPEG-2 (the video standard utilized by the DVD format). You might be better off getting a cheap miniDV cam and using iMovie and iDVD. I don't know if iMovie will allow you to capture from VHS through the miniDV cam, but I do know that most miniDV cams now allow you to "pass through" a composite video signal (from a VHS) to your computer. I don't see why iMovie wouldn't allow you to do this. I do it often with Final Cut Pro. Then you just use iDVD to build your DVD.
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Old Oct 5, 2004, 02:36 PM   #3
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oh, and you don't need another hard drive unless you need the space. An hour of full-quality video (before MPEG-2 encoding) takes up almost 13 GB.
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Old Oct 5, 2004, 07:18 PM   #4
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which canpus models are you looking at and i will tell you the difference.
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Old Oct 5, 2004, 07:42 PM   #5
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Don't go cheap, you will get artifacts and other junk.

I offer this service locally, and call my company "Video 2 DVD." If you are interesting, PM me.

An FYI: Have a seperate partition for your video stuff (if you plan to do a lot of it). Makes it easy to wipe clean, allow stuff to run fast, etc.

Many mini-DV camcorders have this ability, but they require you to record onto an internal tape and then play it. That way, you don't need to drop $300+ for a DV-analog bridge. The downside is you need to play it once to get it onto the tape, and then once again onto the computer.
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Old Oct 5, 2004, 07:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatGirl
I am hoping someone can give me a little guidance about this subject. I am using an iMac G4, on Jaguar. I have been looking at several models of VHS to DVD converters and would like to know if anyone knows the difference between them.

The cheapest I found was the DataVideo DAC-100(DAC100). When I decided to order it, the operator at the online store told me that people are not usually happy with those and end up returning them, to buy the Canopus brand.

I looked up the Canopus models. There is one just slightly more expensive that the Datavideo. Then there are three other models. The prices range from about $200 to about $450. I tried reading the details to understand the difference, but I just don't know enough about the process itself, to know how to judge the advantages of the highest priced model over the lower priced ones.

Also, do I need to buy a peripheral harddrive to store the data while it is being processed?

I would greatly appreciate any insight anyone has to share about this.

Thank you.
I use my PowerBook 12" to make DVDs from movies on my computer and from other VHS. I know that there are many apps fro this and driver... I use a cheap my TV to go and it works fine.
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Old Oct 5, 2004, 11:25 PM   #7
ThatGirl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superbovine
which canpus models are you looking at and i will tell you the difference.
Thanks!
These are the models I have been reading about:
Canopus ADVC55 Advanced Digital Video Converter (770-10138-100)
Canopus ADVC-100 A/D Converter (77010072100)
Canopus ADVC-110 CONVERTER
Canopus ADVC-300 (77010133100)

I found that the information seemed identical for the two middle models. It's just really confusing. Thanks, again.


Thanks to everyone else for your replies, also.
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Old Oct 6, 2004, 12:15 AM   #8
live4ever
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I can highly recommend the ADVC55 it's compact, bus-powered and does great DV captures. The other models are all great too though.
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Old Oct 6, 2004, 06:21 PM   #9
ThatGirl
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Quote:
Originally Posted by live4ever
I can highly recommend the ADVC55 it's compact, bus-powered and does great DV captures. The other models are all great too though.
Thanks! I notice in the descriptions of these products, the ADVC55 does not say "Locked Audio" the way the others do. Is that very important? Is the audio quality good with the "55"?


Thank you.
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Old Oct 6, 2004, 06:54 PM   #10
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Go for the ADVC100 It will do audio sync if you are converting hrs of footage.
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Old Oct 6, 2004, 10:56 PM   #11
superbovine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThatGirl
Thanks!
These are the models I have been reading about:
Canopus ADVC55 Advanced Digital Video Converter (770-10138-100)
Canopus ADVC-100 A/D Converter (77010072100)
Canopus ADVC-110 CONVERTER
Canopus ADVC-300 (77010133100)

I found that the information seemed identical for the two middle models. It's just really confusing. Thanks, again.


Thanks to everyone else for your replies, also.
I look at the ones, you wanted. the 300 is for very high quality conversion. Most likely you will not benefit from vhs to digital conversion unless you are using S-VHS. Standard vhs tapes you probably would not see the quality difference between 300 and the 100/110. I would however not choose the 55, because you noticed that it goes not have "Locked Audio" . What that means is the device makes sure the audio and video are synced.

Different cameras sync up audio and video using the same technique, however, some of the hardware suffers from a rounding error do to how they do the calculations. what all the garbage means is the lips and their voice don't sync up. have you seen a back the scene thing where you see hear them say action and they make a snapping sound with a board. the snapping sound is what professional use to line the audio and video since they are on seperate tapes. well the "locked audio" does all that nice stuff for you since they are the same tape and prevents "fade". if the device does not have that then you will need professional video editing software with the proper tools to fix it. like the other poster said it will only affect with hours of footage.

anyways, your choice is between the 100/110 in my humble opinion. first off, the 110 specs says it works with ilife. 100 probably does too, it is just probably older. the other difference is between the firewire bandwith is double the rate. from the price difference on the canopus website the extra $20 is worth paying for the double the bandwidth to get the most millage and out of your device. also having it work out of the box with ilife would make me happy as well.
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Old Oct 6, 2004, 11:44 PM   #12
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Quote:
The downside is you need to play it once to get it onto the tape, and then once again onto the computer.
That depends upon the camera. My Canon ZR70 will convert in real-time without having to write to tape.
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Old Oct 7, 2004, 10:47 AM   #13
ThatGirl
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superbovine - Thank you , so much! I really appreciate your help. You explained it in a way that even I was able to understand. Are you a classroom teacher? You should be.

I think the 110 sounds like the best for my situation.

How much harddrive free space does one need to convert one tape successfully?

Thanks again.


bootedbear - I'll bet that is a great camera. Mine is pretty low end, so it probably does not do anything like that. It's a pretty old model. That's o.k. though. Looks like a solution is right in front of me.
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Old Oct 7, 2004, 11:14 AM   #14
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Upon reading reviews of the Canopus ADVC-300 it seems like this product has some video noise stabilization built in that the lower models don't have - can anyone confirm this? I would assume that if you're converting old decaying video tapes that you would probably want a built-in digital cleaning filter in your converter - yes? no? I to am on the fence on one of these Canopus products - not sure if I should get the 100, 110 or the 300.
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Old Oct 7, 2004, 12:15 PM   #15
ThatGirl
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I looked again at the descriptions. This was listed under the 110:

Quote:
Proven DV Codec Technology
At the heart of ADVC110 is Canopus's proprietary DV codec chip, providing the industry's best picture quality preservation during analog-to-DV and DV-to-analog conversion.
Does "best picture quality preservation" mean that it does any cleaning up at all, or just preserves it, as is? (I'm not even sure I need it to be "cleaned up", but some of the tapes are about 15 years old.)
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Old Oct 7, 2004, 12:21 PM   #16
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Yeah, most of the tapes I want to preserve are 10+ years old and are starting to show some degradation. That's why I was looking at the 300 - their website says:

"featuring high-quality image enhancement technology including digital noise reduction and image stabilization using Line Time Base Correction (LTBC), ADVC300 instantly cleans, stabilizes and preserves old VHS and Hi8 videos in clean DV format."

It's a couple hundred more than the 100 or 110 but it may be worth it - I need to poke around the web for some com prehensive reviews before deciding.
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Old Oct 7, 2004, 12:45 PM   #17
ThatGirl
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I'd be very interested to hear what you find out, and grateful if you would share the information.
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Old Oct 7, 2004, 12:52 PM   #18
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ThatGirl - I'll bookmark this forum and post what I find in the next few days.
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Old Oct 7, 2004, 12:55 PM   #19
ThatGirl
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Thank you, very much!

Edited to add
This one also looks interesting:
Canopus TwinPact100 Multifunctional Digital Video Converter* MacOS/ Windows.

Apparently it has on-screen graphics and video capture. I wonder if that means you can edit as it is converting the VHS data. The price is very close to the 300.

Last edited by ThatGirl; Oct 7, 2004 at 01:13 PM.
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Old Oct 10, 2004, 05:18 PM   #20
ThatGirl
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This is what I found on the Twin Pact 100:
http://www.academicsuperstore.com/ma...?PartNo=709532

I don't see anything about Locked Audio. Is it implied in some other part of the description that I am missing?

Thanks.
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