17" PowerBook insurance

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by Pablo, Apr 21, 2003.

  1. Pablo macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2003
    Location:
    Texas
    #1
    I've never been thrilled that Apple doesn't provide the same 'Complete Care' that Dell provided with my Inspiron (basically any damage that was not intentionally caused is covered). I've had the 17" for just over two weeks; and last week's threads on the cracked LCD sort of got me in a panic. So I called my insurance agent.

    She was out on vacation, but came back today. I added the Powerbook (value of $3300) to my homeowner's policy as an exhibit. Basically the same coverage that Dell provides (goes above and beyond the 'normal' coverages of property in the homeowner's policy).

    $48/year with a $100 deductible.

    Hopefully I'll never need it, but (aside from the deductible) it's cheaper than the Dell plan, and not that much in the grand scheme of things - especially in comparison to the replacement cost of the LCD or any other major component of the Powerbook.

    I also purchased the PB on my AMEX card, which doubles Apple's 1-year warranty (in effect a 2-year limited warranty without the phone support) - pretty much making Apple Care not nearly as attractive (or necessary).
     
  2. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #2
    Careful, you might loose your homeowners insurance if you put a claim down. Insurers are getting increasingly unscrupulous as to their liabilities. If your furnishings are part of a different policy or have their own special rider then that would be different. You also might be able to find a special policy for your equipment only, thus if you make a claim it won't affect your homeowners policy. Just be careful. Even asking what a claim does to your rates could have your homeowners insurance canceled. If you paied for it on your credit card, you might already be insured. Credit card companies never make it easy to file a claim, but from what I have heard, if you qualify, restitution is quick and painless.

    Look at the policy as something what you want for the big emergencies. A 3000-dollar repair on your house might be something that you could afford, but a 30k-dollar claim is something that you couldn't easily afford, thus claim worthy.
     
  3. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #3
    M$N had an article on this, and I can't find it.

    Try This

    Or this which tells about makeing a claim.

    and one more for good measure

    None are specific about how a claim can make it hard for you to keep your insurance or how it can make it impossible to sell your house.

    Neither one is as good as the I found previously, but I'll keep looking.
     
  4. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #4
    M$N had an article on this, and I can't find it.

    Try This

    Or this which tells about makeing a claim.

    Neither one is as good as the I found previously, but I'll keep looking.
     
  5. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #5
    There is a national database (can't remember where) which tracks the claims on a property, sort of like your driving record for a car affecting insurance.

    Too many claims may keep a home from being insured or renewed.

    Another thing to check when buying a home, check with you insurance agent to find out if the previous owner had a lot of claims on it and will mean the new owner will be SOL, or get nailed with a sky-high policy.

    --- OK it's in one of Eniregnat's links or www.choicetrust.com for a CLUE home claims report. ;)
     
  6. jaybeekay macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2003
    #6
    I go through safeware.com I have my powerbook 15" 550 on there and i dropped it and they replaced it a with a 800 mhz powerbook. With the powerbook and a few other things i have about 3500 worth of insurance 100 bucks yearly and a $50 deductable.
     

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