20" iMac G5, 250 GB or 500 GB hard drive?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by waltchan, Mar 11, 2006.

  1. waltchan macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2005
    #1
    Which one makes more sense, a 250 GB hard drive or a 500 GB hard drive? If I select the 500 GB hard drive, will it slow down the computer's performance a little?
     
  2. Atlasland macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2005
    Location:
    London, UK
    #2
    No.

    The only question is do you need the extra storage. Don't worry about relative speeds.
     
  3. iPhil macrumors 68040

    iPhil

    #3

    I second that.. only question for the OP is: do you want external drives cluttering up desk space/floor space or no ?
     
  4. puckhead193 macrumors G3

    puckhead193

    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    #4
    Can a user upgrade the hard easily on the iMac?


    if so and your not that computer literate and don't want to open the computer up and install a new hard drive when that fills ups get the 500 GB
     
  5. waltchan thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2005
    #5
    Let's say I bought a 500 GB iMac. If there is 400 GB on storage right, how is the perfomance in terms of speed when comparing to a 250 GB with 150 GB in it? Isn't it much slower because there is too much stuff added into the computer. I know when I add more things into my PC computer, the speed slows down.
     
  6. iPhil macrumors 68040

    iPhil

    #6

    The old G5 iMacs yes.. but the intel iMacs are a pain to open and upgrade .. "I think apple says if consumer opens intel iMac it voids the warranty" . <<IIRC

    :eek: :confused: :eek:
     
  7. amholl macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2004
    Location:
    Boston
    #7
    On the G5 ones it was easy. but not anymore on the mactels methinks.
     
  8. MacMyFast macrumors newbie

    MacMyFast

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2006
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #8
    Hard Drive Question

    I would recommend getting the 250 in the iMac and purchasing an external network drive when you run out of space. For the same amount of space, this is a cheaper option and it allows take your drive outside the home if need be.

    Here's a good one: http://www.lacie.com/products/product.htm?pid=10057 . If you wait to purchase this drive for maybe 6 months, you'll likely be able to get 500 gb for $300.
     
  9. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #9
    NO no no no

    No no no no...A computer's performance has NOTHING to do with the amount of data on its hard drive (unless the hard drive is, say, 99% full, leaving no room for virtual memory or swap files).
    The PC slow down you experience is most likely a fragmented disk, and has NOTHING to do with the amount of files you have saved.
     
  10. TMA macrumors 6502a

    TMA

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    Location:
    England
    #10
    I thought latency/seek times can be slightly higher on bigger drives but the difference wouldn't be noticeable. Correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  11. Kingsly macrumors 68040

    Kingsly

    #11
    I would get the 500 Gbyte, but remember: thats 500 Gbytes that can potentially fail. Backup often!
     
  12. homerjward macrumors 68030

    homerjward

    Joined:
    May 11, 2004
    Location:
    fig tree
    #12
    i know read/write speed is generally higher due to increased data density/more platters, but i've never heard that.
     
  13. waltchan thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2005
    #13
    So a 500 GB hard drive is more likely to fail or crash than a 250 GB hard drive? Is the lifespan shorter?
     
  14. Kingsly macrumors 68040

    Kingsly

    #14
    No. Its just that much more data that can be lost.
     
  15. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2004
    Location:
    Georgia
    #15
    Homerjward is correct about larger drives generally being faster from the increased data density. Testing on Tomshardware.com has shown the transfer rates to be higher especially with large files. These larger drives usually have 16mb cache while the 250 and below usually have 8mb cache helping the larger drives even more performance wise. Look at the Seagate 7200.7 160gb versus a Seagate 7200.8 400GB in this test, it's about 30-40% faster in some areas. http://www.tomshardware.com/2005/10...00_gb_gets_ready_to_face_the_world/page4.html
     
  16. MRU macrumors demi-god

    MRU

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Ireland
    #16
    Personally I went with 250 as it was a €330 BTO difference.

    An external 500gb can be bought for around that price giving a total of 750gb (well 700 after the space you lose once formated :( ) which represents better value for money.
     
  17. homerjward macrumors 68030

    homerjward

    Joined:
    May 11, 2004
    Location:
    fig tree
    #17
    no, he's just stating that, in the event of a disk failure, you lose more data from the 500gb drive than the 250gb one.
     
  18. iPhil macrumors 68040

    iPhil

    #18
    The size of Hard drive you lose from formatting is between 5% to 10% of box packaging.. example: i got a 160 GB rated from Manufacturer and now it's 154GB in size after formatting to HFS+

    So 6 GB lost on average per 160 GB in size, So on a 750GB Hdd you'd lose about 30GB after formatting that drive so you'd end up @ 720GB drive ..
     
  19. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #19
    It's not to do with the formatting at all...
    <Start Maths lesson>
    Basically Hard drive manufacturers say that 1kilo byte is 1000 bytes, however the operating system says that 1kilo byte is 2^10 or 1024 bytes, this scales up for Megabytes and Gigabytes respectively. So basically a 160GB hard drive has 160 000 000 000 bytes on it, but when converted into operating system Gigabytes this is only 149GB, often the hard drive manufacturers are a little generous so you get a disk that is slightly bigger than this figure, but still less than 160GB.

    See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigabyte for more information.
    <end Maths lesson>
     
  20. iPhil macrumors 68040

    iPhil

    #20

    What I was saying in my post #18 is You should always expect to lose between 5% and 10% of hard-drive space after formatting because some ppl believe that its the amount on the box is after formatting ..

    i was trying to keep the terminology simple for n00bs etc .. :p :p
     
  21. Uma888 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Location:
    Birmingham, United Kingdom
    #21
    I have an iMac G5 /500GB

    I have 171.85GB free.

    Im glad i got it.

    I have 2 320gbs for archiving/backing up

    Im glad i have them
     
  22. Stridder44 macrumors 68040

    Stridder44

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2003
    Location:
    California
    #22
    What?? Speed doesn't correspond to how big your HardDrive is?



    I always turn down the brightness on my monitor to save on system RAM. Sometimes I unplug the mouse and keyboard whenever running processor-intensive applications.
     
  23. mcmillan macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    #23
    As some people said already, many users assume that adding more files will slow down your computer, however, that happens only if you leave no room for virtual memory, so theoretically, it will take more time to slow down your computer performance (because you need to have more than 495Gb to leave no room for virtual memory). So buy the space that you need.
     
  24. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #24
    True, good point, it just really annoys me for some totally irrational reason ;)
     
  25. killmoms macrumors 68040

    killmoms

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2003
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    #25
    I hope this is a joke. :eek:
     

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